Nov

27

Review: Bound, an Alex Caine novel by Alan Baxter

Posted by: danica in

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Bound  is the first book in a series by Alan Baxter. The book  detailing the adventures of a professional Australian fighter who can see the aura of people’s intentions, super duper handy for him, he is pretty much undefeated. His world is completely turned upside down when a mysterious man appears and tells him he knows his secret and can give him a greater taste of a world he never new existed.

This book has some great things going for it. It is really fast paced, goes from one point of action to the next quickly. It covers a lot of ground and there is never a dull moment. It is the first book in a series and I can definitely see where it is heading, Baxter could really be on to something if he improves on a few key components of his work. I love how realistic Baxter tries to get elements of the plot and solve them with his new rules. Alex Caine isn’t rich and it takes a bit of money to trip around the world, I laughed  (in a good way) when I saw his dilemma and his solution for it. The secondary characters were hilarious and actually pretty well developed, I loved the little interludes telling the story from their point of view.

Unfortunately the fast pace means the characterisation is a bit lacking. That’s not to say it isn’t there but it is superficial, even in the case of the main character, this really needs to be improved on in the next books. The dialogue was off too, not anything too extreme but at times I think he could have gone for ‘less is more’.

While I have more good to say than bad, the characterisation is a huge problem for me personally. I accept that it probably will get better and might ask for the next book to review too later down the track. If you like fast pace action and want something that doesn’t take itself too seriously give it a go. If you are Australian, definitely give it a go (you’ll appreciate it even more). If you really care about characterisation, maybe wait till I have news on the second, if it is better I’ll just give you a quick summary and then you can enjoy the second one too!

2.5 great balls of power

* I received this book for free and that in no way influences my opinions. I can’t believe you would doubt me!



Nov

24

Free Book: Skin Deep by Brandon Sanderson

Posted by: Jon Snow in

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Have you read Legion; a novella by Brandon Sanderson about a man with multiple personalities?

The sequel called Skin Deep is out.  Leeds (the main character) is hired to recover a corpse, stolen from a morgue. Except this body belongs to a pioneer in biotechnology, concerned with using the body as a massive storage device, embedding memory into cells. Is there anything potentially in his dead body that someone wants?

Here is a sound clip of the audiobook. If you think you like it, you can download the entire book for free at Audible.

Let us know if you are from outside the US, if you can download it. I’m from New Zealand and it is unavailable!



Nov

8

Review: Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss

Posted by: Jon Snow in

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The Slow Regard of Silent Things is a beautifully presented novella by Patrick Rothfuss that while set in the same world as Kvothe’s Kingkiller Chronicles, bears so little resemblance to the main novels that one can almost be forgiven for forgetting that they existed within the same world. Certainly, the novella is nowhere near central to the main story arc and as Rothfuss himself asserts “I think its only fair to warn you that this is a bit of a strange book…. And if you’re looking for a continuation of Kvothe’s storyline, you’re not going to find it here”. 

The story instead gives a wonderfully poetic insight into one of Rothfuss’s tragically broken secondary characters, Auri over the space of seven days as she makes her life under the University in the patchwork of tunnels and rooms she calls the Underthing. As one would expect from previous encounters with Auri, the life she leads is otherwordly and Rothfuss’s choice to write here story from a third person perspective, provides a vivid constrast with his main novels.

Whilst not providing anything by way of what might be described as a “normal” story, most demonstrably evidenced by a full eight pages describing Auri making soap, the story is however, a wonderful example of a storyteller not afraid of leaning heavily on the textured and atmospheric setting as the story’s main drawcard. In doing so, Rothfuss manages to pull of with ease writing the entire novella with no dialogue and containing the solitary character, Auri. She is, however, interwoven with a range of inanimate objects, who are so lifelike that they seem like supporting characters and which provide the necessary interaction to enable the story to work.

In my opinion, this one is most definitely for the more literary-minded readers out there who enjoy descriptive writing capable of effortlessly creating the dreamlike imagery that is Auri’s world. Surprisingly, given my overwhelming desire for a strong plot underpinning any book, I really enjoyed the story. I’d probably put this down to the length of the story which is easily read in a couple of hours and hence managed to retain my interest throughout. By achieving a better understanding of Auri and to a much lesser degree the world of Temerant, I’m happy I’ve read The Slow Regard of Silent Things but would reservedly recommend it to fans of Rothfuss who have completed the first two novels of the Kingkiller Chronicles. Do not expect anything like his previous incarnations, this one really is different.

 

By Antoxx