2017's What fiction or non-fiction book are you reading?

Discussion in 'Fiction (General)' started by Silvion Night, Feb 4, 2017.

  1. Silvion Night

    Silvion Night Sir Readalot Staff Member

    I just started on the 1Q84 trilogy by Murakami. It's a collection band with all three books combined. As such it is one of the biggest books I've ever read (1400 pages) rivalling The Stand and LOTR.

    I'm about 100 pages in and I still don't really know what this book is about, although there are some interesting things happening. The setting, 80's Japan, is also very interesting. I don't know a lot about modern-day Japanese culture and as such this book is intriguing to me even because of the setting alone.
     
  2. Darth Tater

    Darth Tater Journeyed there and back again

    Today I plan to begin The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk. All I know about the book is that there is a mutiny, Misterr Chrisssstian, a trial, and Captain Blye. So it will be exciting to read going in blind (that's a contradiction in terms, isn't it? :D

    Anyhow, I read The Glory by him a couple years ago. The Hope covers the Israeli six day war and the Glory is the aftermath. I thought the Glory was very well written, informative, and touching. He also wrote The Winds Of War and War And Remembrance. "I knew The Caine Mutiny came out in the fifties (1951) so I wondered when he died. After all, that was 66 years ago. Well, guess what? He is still alive and kicking!! He was born in 1915 and that makes him 102 years old. So I hope to finish it before he moves on. :oldman:
     
  3. Darth Tater

    Darth Tater Journeyed there and back again

    Oh sheesh. I got Mutiny On The Bounty and The Caine Mutiny mixed up. Forget Cap'n Blye and that stuff. :bag: :dead:
     
  4. Darth Tater

    Darth Tater Journeyed there and back again

    The Caine Mutiny. I don't need to tell anyone that Herman Wouk can write. He states things simply and matter of factly without wasting words. He somehow draws you in and makes you care about these realistic characters.

    The first half of the book was kind of slow but not boring. I think a lot of novels from "the old days" were like that. Nobody and nothing is purely good or bad.

    The story is mostly from the POV of one character and is divided into around four parts. His life and romance just before enlisting in the Navy during WWII. Then his experiences. Next the mutiny. Lastly the trial and aftermath.

    Checked out some of the movie clips afterwards. The acting was great and the essences of the characters were splendidly captured.

    Has anyone read anything by Wouk? Interested to know your thoughts. If you havent read anything by humin I think it is worth considering.
     
  5. Darth Tater

    Darth Tater Journeyed there and back again

    A couple mysteries. Will run out of Louise Penny books soon enogh.

    My first (and final) Ellery Queen's The Greek Casket.. A lot of reviewers found it to be convoluted. I agree. Some said it was an aberration. IMO are better mysteries out there that are modern. Others loved it. These cozy mysteries (like Agatha Christie's) are a nice soothing break for me. They are not the foo foo apple pie ones. But Ellery Queen was so so. The solution took so long that it was boring with bland characters. I dislike male mystery writers.

    Tried a Patricia Wentworth. First half was mundane but the next half was almost an exciting thriller. The detective is like a middle aged more business type Miss Marple. She dumps a lot of characters on youwith so many aliases and lord knows where or how she gets her amazing info??? Very confusing
    Regardless , I will read another at some point.

    Now on to fantasy!! :cool:
     
  6. CelestialAeon

    CelestialAeon A farm boy with a sword

    Finished Daniel Suarez Daemon a while ago, it was enjoyable while a tad bit silly. Currently reading the third book of Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron, it has been really good read so far. Nice combination of detailed medieval warfare and interesting fantasy elements.
     
  7. Bierschneeman

    Bierschneeman Journeyed there and back again

    Starting war and peace, restarting unbearable lightness of being, abandoning gone with the wind until I find a complete copy.
     
  8. Darth Tater

    Darth Tater Journeyed there and back again

    *crickets*

    Louise Penny Inspector Gamache mystery series. A Trick Of the Light. IMO, best one yet She makes you feel like you're really in this Canadian village. Complex characters that grow (series should be read in order). Interesting plot. If you want a great get away from it all modern day Agatha Christie type book (no excessive on scene violence and no swearing) I highly recommend these. Best read in order for full experience). I've read books 3-7 and love it!! 5/5
     
  9. Darth Tater

    Darth Tater Journeyed there and back again

    Dorothy Sayers. Gaudy Night. Lord Wimfrey book 12. The mystery was enjoyable but the lady was born in 1893 so too much latin, too many poems, and too many tangents where I couldn't even understand what she was even talking about or how it related to the story. Still, I enjoyed it despite these things. But I doubt I will read any more of her books. One of the rare mysteries I've read where
    there isn't a murder.
    The story takes place in a womens college where the pranks are far from funny. 4/5 ​
     
  10. Silvion Night

    Silvion Night Sir Readalot Staff Member

    Some time ago I finished 1Q84 by Murakami. It is a huge tome (1400 pages) in the Magical Realism genre. A lot of people seem to like this book. I am not one of them. Nothing much happens at all. The story is ridiculously slow. I also get the feeling a lot gets lost in translation from Japanese to English. I don't want to go into too much detail, but I would recommend against picking this one up. 4/10.
     
  11. kenubrion

    kenubrion Journeyed there and back again

    I'm reading a western, Jubal Sackett, by Louis L'Amour. I originally read it so long ago that everything is new again. L'Amour wrote 17 books centered on the Sackett family and their generation by generation progress from the eastern US to the west and the Pacific ocean.
     

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