2018's What fiction or nonfiction book are you reading?

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#41
@Darth Tater
gethsmane...guessname?

Is the awkward pronounciation intentional? maybe not that specific pronounciation, but any of a number one could devise that might or might not deal with plot.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#42
@Darth Tater
gethsmane...guessname?



Is the awkward pronounciation intentional? maybe not that specific pronounciation, but any of a number one could devise that might or might not deal with plot.
Unsure. The author and protagonist are African-American but I do not think she is pushing any kind of social agenda.

I just looked it up and it’s a biblical name. So Ruth, Mary, or Bathsheeba? There were some crazy Irish names in there too. It just detracts from the flow. Other than that it was a wonderful debut IMO, and I will take crappy names over a crappy story any day.

I really feel for TALENTED new writers. They just need a damned break. Put them on a Daily Kindle Deal and their careers would skyrocket. I saw this book listed on somebody’s blog, liked the sound of it, checked out a couple pages and looked at the review numbers. Checked out a few reviewers to confirm legitamacy and I’m now a big fan.
 
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Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#43
I’m 100 pages into the book Airport which was released exactly 50 years ago. It was a bestseller and very popular movie back in the day. It was a Kindle Deal so I grabbed it. Arthur Hailey wrote books in which he takes you behind the scenes in various industries (Wheels, Hotel, Airport, Detective, Strong Medicine, etc.) The books are very well researched.

Airport grabbed me from page one. I thought it might be outdated but it isn’t as far as writing style. It was updated in 2,000 and in the foreward he tells you how procedures have tightened up considerably since 1968 (ironically he wrote this a year BEFORE 911 happened). He also made it more PC (50 years ago the word “negro” was used instead of “African American”. so he changed it in the new edition.

I had no idea how many things happened and how many people it takes to run an airport smoothly. I knew the job of air traffic controler ws like the most stressful job in the world but didn’t imagine HOW stressful it was. I think the job has an extremely high suicide rate? Anyhow, I’m loving it. Tough to put down.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#44
Completed Airport by Arthur Hailey. While Airport is a good airplane book (pin intended) it goes beyond that. Seems like a whole lot of thrillers focus on the action and even though they are fun and exciting there isn’t a lot of substance to them. Cardboard cutout characters more often than not. The bad ass protagonist, smart pretty girl he meets, Snidely Whiplash baddie. Some take these and go deeper but Hailey has a large (but not too large and they are slowly introduced) cast and the characters are diverse, interesting, and very human with real problems. Exciting from beginning to end without starting with someone running for their life on page one.

Really, he researches all books really well and there are interesting things you learn about ticket takers, maintenance crews, pilots, management, security, flight insurance sales people and machines, just about everything. It may sound boring but it isn’t. Picked it up for $1.99 last month and will buy the one this month for the same price on the pharmaceutical industry.

If you need a breather from fantasy consider Arthur (not to be confused with Alex-the author of Roots) Hailey.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#45
Dante’s Inferno. I guess my version is in poem form But it is quite good, and I am so glad I am reading it finally. Thanks to @Bierschneeman for motivating me. The churches loved this because it scared the *hell* out of people. Which drove people to church. Dante’s hell is how the masses view it. Quite creepy and I’m only at the first level! Definitely a horror book. Was it the first horror book ever, I wonder?
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#46
Dante’s Inferno. I guess my version is in poem form But it is quite good, and I am so glad I am reading it finally. Thanks to @Bierschneeman for motivating me. The churches loved this because it scared the *hell* out of people. Which drove people to church. Dante’s hell is how the masses view it. Quite creepy and I’m only at the first level! Definitely a horror book. Was it the first horror book ever, I wonder?
Are you reading the Divine Comedy in full, or just Inferno?
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#47
Dante’s Inferno. I guess my version is in poem form But it is quite good, and I am so glad I am reading it finally. Thanks to @Bierschneeman for motivating me. The churches loved this because it scared the *hell* out of people. Which drove people to church. Dante’s hell is how the masses view it. Quite creepy and I’m only at the first level! Definitely a horror book. Was it the first horror book ever, I wonder?
Are you reading the Divine Comedy in full, or just Inferno?
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#48
post # 1001

this week i reread
Naked Lunch~ William S Burroughs
Junky~ WilliamS Burroughs
Queer~ WilliamS Burroughs

I typically reread my favorite book (naked lunch) once every 2-5 years whenever I see a new version. I found an audiobook with the best speaker I have ever heard for any book. he channels the spirit of Burroughs very well, his narration voice is reminiscent of Burroughs ' voice. each character in the novel has a unique voice which seemingly matches what I would expect Burroughs to imagine as the best depiction. from whiny needly addicts to gruff hard boiled detective with a slight perversity in undertones, even dr. Benway was perfect.

I just had to relax, " exterminae
all rational thought" and succumb deeply to this "viscious word virus" on "addicts of drugs not yet synthesized"

after that youtube queued Junky, as narrated by Burroughs himself, an autobiography on his descent into usage and the difficulties he went through to quit.

then I had to read Queer to complete the trio. a sequel to Junky discarded and finally published 30 years later (on the insisting of Jack kerouac) this picks up right after the end of junky (skipping over a very important moment, the catalyst for the events of queer) . with a heartbreaking introduction that describes how appalled he was at realizing the whole reason for him to pick up writing was his accidental killing of his wife in between junky and queer. this propels him to fall in love with a man and shadow after him through central and South America.

I do not recommend these books to anyone on this forum, Burroughs is the most vulgar writer I've ever read. his descent in all his books is indescribly vivid as it hits you with exceeding depression of trying to experience his troubles with drug use descent into umderbelly crime, fear, withdraw, sexual frustration, and suicidal thoughts that lace every chapter.

I will say the introductions and afterwards are required reading for his books.
Are you reading the Divine Comedy in full, or just Inferno?
Just where I'm headed. I didn’t see any reason to bother with the others. Adding envy to my list of sins only takes me down one level lower.
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#51
The Republic ~ Plato
Nicomachaen Ethics~ Aristotle
Analects ~ Confucious
Art of War ~ Sun Tzu
Tao Te Ching ~ Lao Zhu
The Prince ~Machiavelli
Common Sense ~ Thomas Paine
Wages and Prices ~ Karl Marx
Communist Manefesto ~Friederich Engels and Marx
Beyond Good and Evil ~ Friederich Neitzche
You read all of these in one week??? WOW! :eek:
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#52
You read all of these in one week??? WOW! :eek:
they are mostly tiny pamphlets of around 100 or less pages.
they are also mostly rereads so it didn't require intensive quadruple rereads.


although I did read nearly every word twice, because of the philosophical nature. one small section once. pause to ponder and read it again (this time with along with an audiobook.)
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#53
finished East of Eden a while ago, forgot to write a review.

one of Stenbecks later novels, it is the most unlike his other works. it's written like a Faulkner plot through and through. although without the incoherent time jumps.

everyone is evil, everyone suspects everyone else, and the entwined lives of love lust and murder lasts decades.
whats more to say. if you like Faulkner this is a rip off.

7/10
 

Anti_Quated

Journeyed there and back again
#54
Just where I'm headed. I didn’t see any reason to bother with the others. Adding envy to my list of sins only takes me down one level lower.
The delicious sadism of Contrapasso doesn't end in Cocytus. You owe it to yourself to take the long, gruelling ascent through Purgatorio and on to redemption in Paradiso. Dante's personal eschatology, while far from epigrammatic and possibly too righteous in the end for some, is still a beautiful and masterfully composed meditation that should be treasured. Epic, in the proper sense. While Inferno is easily my favourite, I rather enjoyed Puragtory and Paradise nonetheless. Something of a completionist's foible, perhaps.
 

Andrew.J

Journeyed there and back again
#55
I'm currently reading Brothers Karamazov as an attempt to familiarise and get into Russian literature. The book is surprisingly immersive and easy to read. I usually don't expect that from older works, but that may be form my lack of experience in these genres.

It's too early to make any conclusions yet, but the characters are fascinating and paragraphs of their intense monologues and dialogues are very amusing.

Edit: I also thought I'd mention that I'm reading a Lithuanian translation. I figured it was closer to the original version at least in some aspects (cases, diminutive created by adding suffixes, etc.). I'm not sure how well Russian translates to English.
 
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Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#56
Finished Sunlight at Midnight~ W. Bruce Lincoln
and Yage Letters ~ William S Burroughs.

been reading Sunloight at midnight since January, It reads like a Biography of a city, going through the players, the builders the artists architects and the political influences that made the city what it is. Every architect that stylized the various buildings, even ones whose buildings were destroyed.

Specifically it deals with the writers, as the center of Russia from its creation until 1917, it also serves as the cultural center with every major writer living there at any sort of time. even a micro-Russian-bohemia during the decades immediately before the revolution. Funny thing is that the majority of the writers, painters, poets, and artists that populated the low rent (relatively low) areas of st. Petersburgs and encouraged revolution, demanding change from the tsarist oppression. THESE same artists abandoned the country after the revolution because they saw the new government as just as oppressive or more. The artists were each followed by the book, exiled, killed by Bolsheviks, imprisoned by the same people they helped bring into power, a lot of them commited suicide leaving it known that they felt responsible.

Yage letters is a reread, I was planning to get rid of it, BUT, I found so many passages I must always be able to reference... oh well.

Bruce Lincoln is one of the best writers you can read about Russia, in America.

7/10
and 7/10
 

fbones24

Journeyed there and back again
#57
I have taken a little break from Fantasy. It's a short one. Currently reading "Killing Rommel" by Steven Pressfield. Historical fiction about Long Range Desert Group's operations in the North African campaign in WWII.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#58
April to present. In between fantasy books:

Allan (Quatrmain) And The Holy Flower, and The Ivory Child both by Henry Haggard. The leader (Sean Connery) in the The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen. He’s basically the original Indiana Jones. Wild African adventures Many free on Kindle.

The Ape Who Guards The Balance by Elizabeth Perers. Her historical mysteries are about Amelia Peabody and her cast of family and friends. She and her husband are Egyptologists. Amelia is the narrator. The language used to describe her perceptions are so funny. The setting is early 1900’s Egypt. Amelia is strong willed and suffragette is her middle name. When she is right she knows she’s right and when wrong she still knows she’s riight!

Death in D Minor by Alexia Gordon. Oodles of Ghost and Mrs.Muir-ish fun. I had hoped she patched the holes from the first book but alas. We’re constantly reminded that she comes from a family of highly successful African Americans. She herself is a brilliant and talented conductor. But seriously, turn down an offer of a lifetime to lead the Boston Symphony to teach high school music? And why does this brilliant woman willingly walk into life threatening traps? Major clues pretty much fall out of the sky. Despite all of this the books are fun and charming.

Death at La Fenice,Death in a strange Country and Dressed for Death by Donna Leon. My newest go-to mystery series. Many twists and surprise endings. Underrated.

Strong Medicine. Arthur Hailey. Previously read his Airport. Sure learned a lot of things about the Pharmaceutical industry. The books are slightly outdated as the industries have changed over the last 40-50 years but the fictional stories are well told.

A Midsummer Nights Dream. Shakespeare. Hard to believe these wonderful plays were written several centuries ago. The iambic pentameter is awesome. I hadn’t read any of his books in over 30 years and this one was even funnier the 2nd time around. It’s funny the way they buried “dirty” jokes in between the lines. Kind of like 60’s and 70’s music. Some things never change

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Robert Louis Stevenson. A statement on the duality of man. Dr. Jekyll knowingly and willingly became Hyde. Basically, he was bored with Jekyll and liked becoming Hyde. Didn’t see the screen versions but the book is said to be quite different and better. While it didn’t have quite as much under the hood as Frankenstein I thought the actual writing was much better and the story more “believable”.