A complicated person to recommend a book to... Please Help!!!

mfb90

Will likely be killed by a Lannister soon
#1
Ok, first I'm from Argentina and my main language is Spanish, so sorry for any grammatical or misspelling mistake.

Second and most important, I’m looking for my next reading material and every time i check reviews to choose the next book I'll read, I end up frustrated because no one, it seems, pays attention to the same aspects as I do in books, so they may feel a story is the best in the history of writing while I think it's utter crap (or vice versa).

I look for two main things in a book, well psychologically developed characters with great depth and cohesion on them self (that are shown with subtlety and cunningness to the reader) and a self-respecting plot (with this I mean without plot holes) that is not good against evil as usual but rather "real people" with flaws (neither good or bad) going about their business and solving what comes at them as it comes.

It should be important to note that my favorite novel is The Black Company by Glen Cook, in my opinion a master piece, never have I read someone else that understand and portraits human nature so crudely and expertly as he does. Also Black Fantasy or Grim Dark Fantasy are my favorite sub genders, but at this point any fantasy or even good science fiction are welcome

Some extra information, I prefer that the story is not Fate related, (like Harry Potter or The King killer Chronicle). Also I tend to guess the ending of most stories, and being right in that guess ruins the end for me, so books with "unguessable" endings are a plus. I’m 27 if that is useful for someone.

Thanks to anyone that takes the time to answer. Mariano
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#2
You might like the First Law series by Joe Abercrombie. It is one of the best Grimdark trilogies out there in my opinion. The ending might not be too surprising, but the cool characters more than make up for it.
 

Maark Abbott

Journeyed there and back again
#3
If you like The Black Company, I would be remiss if I didn't recommend Malazan to you.
 

jo zebedee

Journeyed there and back again
#4
I think if you're looking for great characterisation some of the female writers are worth looking at - Robin Hobb springs to mind, although I'm not sure how dark she is, her characterisation is what she's known for.

I'll also mention Mark Lawrence for the shades of grey characters.
 

mfb90

Will likely be killed by a Lannister soon
#5
Thanks to all of you for your time and responses, I'll probably give Malazan a try as I have already read R. Hoob and Joe Abercrombie, and feel no particular attraction to M. Lawrence genre.

Once again Thank You and any other suggestion is more than welcome.
 

jo zebedee

Journeyed there and back again
#6
Thanks to all of you for your time and responses, I'll probably give Malazan a try as I have already read R. Hoob and Joe Abercrombie, and feel no particular attraction to M. Lawrence genre.

Once again Thank You and any other suggestion is more than welcome.
Ah, I only mentioned Lawrence because you said grim dark was one of your favourite subgenres. :)

on another note, have you read any magical realism? Being a Spanish speaker someone like Carlos Ruiz Zafon does great characters - and you could read the full untranslated beauty of his writing. :)
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#8

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#9
Maybe try Guy Gavriel Kay's Tigana. I think it fits what you're looking for in terms of deep characters and people vs people and I can't say I guessed all of the ending either.

If you like Cook, trying Paul Kearney's Monarchies of God series could be a good shout. Very similar vein and thanks to Elvira in the "Have you read X..." thread for reminding me of him!
 
#10
Based on your guidelines, I'd suggest almost anything written by H.G. Wells, especially The Island of Dr. Moreau. Wells, a classic 19th century author, was rather philosophical and could portray the human condition better than any other author I've read. Most of his books aren't a battle between good or evil but rather an exploration of humanity through engaging stories. I think The Island of Dr. Moreau has great characterization and the "antagonist" not only isn't necessarily evil but changes throughout the book. The Time Machine and The Invisible Man also portray great insight into the protagonists' psyche through subtle characterization and play with traditional ideas of good and evil.
 

Darwin

Journeyed there and back again
#12
@afa you've gotta read it! There's three sequels as well, but it's written (in my opinion) as a standalone followed up by a coherent trilogy. The main character, Hari aka "Caine", is an "actor" who people live through in VR immersion chairs. Earth has become a resource-scarce, dystopian planet with a caste-based society. Actors are transported to a sort of resonant parallel universe onto a planet filled with magic and adventure, and experiencing these adventures is the primary source of entertainment for the business and leisure classes.

I'm sort of shocked that you haven't read it. I know our tastes in this genre align pretty well, and this is easily one of my favorite stories.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#13
@afa you've gotta read it! There's three sequels as well, but it's written (in my opinion) as a standalone followed up by a coherent trilogy. The main character, Hari aka "Caine", is an "actor" who people live through in VR immersion chairs. Earth has become a resource-scarce, dystopian planet with a caste-based society. Actors are transported to a sort of resonant parallel universe onto a planet filled with magic and adventure, and experiencing these adventures is the primary source of entertainment for the business and leisure classes.

I'm sort of shocked that you haven't read it. I know our tastes in this genre align pretty well, and this is easily one of my favorite stories.
Darwin, I was thinking as I read it that your explanation of Heroes was the best I've ever read. So I decided to make it official and post it. afa, you won't believe it. btkong couldn't stop praising it when I joined here and man was he right. Best rec I've ever gotten.
 

Maark Abbott

Journeyed there and back again
#14

afa

Journeyed there and back again
#15
I'm sort of shocked that you haven't read it. I know our tastes in this genre align pretty well, and this is easily one of my favorite stories.
afa, you won't believe it. btkong couldn't stop praising it when I joined here and man was he right. Best rec I've ever gotten.
Wow. Those are some hearty recommendations. So much so that now even I'm surprised I haven't read it. I also never realized that it had some SF elements to it; I thought it was straight up Fantasy.

Thanks for the heads up, guys, I'm definitely adding this to my TBR list.