An Inconstant Vision

wakarimasen

Journeyed there and back again
#21
@ralfy all good. all good... well all pretty terrible really... but my question still stands.
What do you think is going to happen? This is a thread for visualising our possible future world and the shapes of society in it.
Hit us with both barrels of your doom gun and describe what you think the world will be like in say 50 / 100 and 500 years...?

Go all Psychohistory on us.
 

João Ribeiro

Journeyed there and back again
#24
I'm on the pessimist camp. Personally I think there will be a crash and those with lands for planting and pasture won't go hungry. One thing that worries me is the possibility of Darwinism kicking in and only the fittest will survive.
So yes, I think an economic, ecologic and technological crash will happen sooner or later, our generation probably won't be around to take the hit but our kids will.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#25

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#28
I stand corrected. I really had no idea, thanks @Sneaky Burrito
History of science of that era (what influenced Darwin, etc.) is something I'm really interested in. Took a whole class in college about it. Would read more about it except I don't seem to have a high tolerance for nonfiction these days. I'm not getting enough sleep and nonfiction puts me out better than sleeping pills ever would.
 

ralfy

Got in a fistfight with Dresden
#29
The difference is that during the early 1900s the global population was much smaller, environmental damage not that severe, the effects of global warming not yet pronounced, governments (together with police and military organizations, as well as prison and surveillance systems) not as dominant, and most people still not heavily dependent on industrialization and middle class conveniences.

In addition, life expectancy rates were much lower and infant mortality rates higher.
 

Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#30
The competition for scarce resources/struggle for existence thing is actually from Malthus (an influence on Darwin, to be sure).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Robert_Malthus
I stand corrected. I really had no idea, thanks @Sneaky Burrito
I remember having to study Malthus' population models in a math class on dynamical systems. While the survival of the fittest theory and the Malthusian principle on population are related, they look at separate issues. One deals with adaptability on a generation-wise basis, the other on the equilibrium of population systems (specifically, on closed systems with finite resources, most often illustrated by the predator-prey relationship). I can certainly imagine that Malthus' work influenced Darwin.