Best Science Fiction books (add your suggestions)

Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#61
Intentionally forced Darwinism.
Reminds me of the Sardaukar in "Dune". Fortunately for Paul, the Fremen were were up to the task, shaped as they were by their equally harsh environment on Arrakis. Dune. Desert Planet.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#62
Reminds me of the Sardaukar in "Dune". Fortunately for Paul, the Fremen were were up to the task, shaped as they were by their equally harsh environment on Dune. Arrakis. Desert Planet.
The author, Stephen Bennett, is an old retired fart who had a story he wanted to tell and no skills, just gave it a whirl. Even after four books it comes off as amateurish, pretty much the opposite of the literature than Banks wrote, but I just love his story. Surprisingly it's almost completely bereft of typos, misspellings, etc. It's so original, and uplifting and possibilities for it to continue to expand just abound. But anyone who goes ahead and tries it, be forewarned, it's not literature. There was a thread on the Amazon fantasy forum last year asking if you had a guilty pleasure book that you would be embarrassed to admit to. This is mine.
 

Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#63
There was a thread on the Amazon fantasy forum last year asking if you had a guilty pleasure book that you would be embarrassed to admit to. This is mine.
Good idea for a thread. Start one for the SF subforum. I'll have to think about what my guilty pleasure in SF reading is.
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#64
Along comes an interstellar cruise ship that they capture and take the humans to their training planet, which is very harsh and has some real vicious predators, to play with. Even the Krall don't populate this planet, it and the native creatures are more than a match even for the Krall.
Funny, that reminds me of Harry Harrison's classic "Deathworld".
A nice and fun read, maybe does not really fill the "Guilty pleasures" requirements.

Best regards,
Andy
 

Bill Door

Killed a Balrog
#65
My favorite Sci Fi novel is Vernor Vinge - A Deepness in the Sky
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#66
Funny, that reminds me of Harry Harrison's classic "Deathworld".
A nice and fun read, maybe does not really fill the "Guilty pleasures" requirements.

Best regards,
Andy
Andy, he has dealt with numerous plagiarism accusations and assures everyone that he's never heard of much less read that book.
 

Eric W Deakin

Killed in the battle against the Mad King
#67
Just read, Columbas Day by Craig Alanson reminds me a lot of Starship Troopers (Robert Heinlein) I can recommend it.
Eric W Deakin
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#68

Eric W Deakin

Killed in the battle against the Mad King
#69
Now read the sequel to Columbus day not quite as good but readable. needs editing in the eBook format.
Eric W Deakin.
amazon.com/author/ericwdeakin
 

jo zebedee

Journeyed there and back again
#70
In no particular order:

The Eden books by Chris Beckett, especially Dark Eden
Vorkosigan by Bujold, especially Memory
Dune and Dune Messiah, the rest I can take or leave
Maps in a Mirror by Card (don't like him, love the writing...)

I'm sure a few more will come to me in time.
 

Theophania

Journeyed there and back again
#71
Vorkosigan by Bujold, especially Memory
Me too... Although I love A Civil Campaign - the dinner party scene is priceless... :)

I'm more of a fantasy person, but...
The middle books in David Weber's Honor Harrington series - where it's starting to really hit its stride with scope, but before it lost steam.
John G. Hemry's JAG in Space series - it's not great literature, but it's an interesting concept and done well.

I've got more books that I'm fond of, in a nostalgic sort of way, or that were interesting. My husband introduced me to Arthur C. Clarke; not really my sort of thing, but it's eye-opening how the man could write stories that weren't necessarily complex, and in some cases are very dated, but are still compelling. A Fall of Moondust is one I particularly remember: very dated, the way the men solve the problem and the women make tea, and the story has a distinct lack of space battles etc... but he writes characters that live (and make tea), and he nails the suspense.
 

jo zebedee

Journeyed there and back again
#72
A Civil Campaign is brillliant. Very funny (bug butter...)

On AC Clarke, I love Rendezvous with Rama. I go back to it from time to time. Also, surprised no one has mentioned Flowers for Algernon. So sad.