Ever tell someone you like fantasy and...

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#21
Motherfucker if I wanted to talk to strangers about electronics on the bus I wouldn't be sitting in the back reading my kindle, go away.
But what if a really hot ___ (name a gender that attracts you) wants to talk to you? :joyful:

And that's the best thing anybody can do.
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#22
I love being in the south (weather reasons) but I live in a county where we have high drop out rates. I live in a very uneducated world.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#23
Never had that Happen, Arya Stark but what state in the South? I Lived mostly in VA and TX
But I do have a tendancy to reduce whatever my wife reads to being Romance Novel (mostly as a tease, but she does read a lot of Traditional Fantasy Setting based Romance Novels)

the closest I have to that, is in some of my many many many Re-reads of William S Burroughs Masterpiece "Naked Lunch". I can never read the whole book without at least 3 interruptions of people who start asking questions about it (it is a curious title, but no nothing to do with naked people, at least not in that sense), The worst one was in the lobby waiting for people to get ready for my cousins wedding, wilst reading a copy that was Bright yellow with bold letters that took up the whole cover "NAKED LUNCH", and older couple who were also on the Brides side of the family (though unrelated to me oddly) approached me and after a very long conversation on books the previous day, the began piling on the questions, and after my most delicate and passionate description, the wife looks to the husband (both retirement aged) and said, "oo ooo ooo write that down, we have to check this book out." I tried slapping in a disclaimer as I found myself in a nervous stammer and full blush... Eh...
either they read it or didn't. either they understood it or didn't. If they did understand it, thats true beatnik of them and they definitely liked it. it doesn't much mattter. But I will ever remember myself essentially suggesting one of the most banned books of eclectic,and disturbingly vivd style (referred to as Pornographic by detractors, and visionary by fans) to a pair of sweet Octegenarians.
 

Antoxx

Journeyed there and back again
#24
I also work in construction, but have no problem telling coworkers I read fantasy, play World of warcraft, ride bicycles, enjoy time with my family, and all sorts of " unmanly" stuff.LoL. I even admit to things like being pro gun control. Just last week I was told to " go smoke some patchouli you fucking hippie". I have no problem being different than all the rednecks and religious zealots I work with.
I work in the Finance industry where just about everyone has a propellor on their head, so it's almost expected that we read geeky things like fantasy if we read anything other than financial derivatives books.
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#25
I live in Florida. And Florida has an entirely screwed up education system thanks to the FCAT. And Jeb Bush and Rick Scott. Some areas in Florida are better than others but at 22 my median salary is twice that of half the population of where I live. So I suppose to the people who assume this are just highly uneducated. It throws me of every time someone asks. I guess I just need to move!
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#26
Oh I forgot to mention another way reading comes up with people is during conversations about tv shows/ commercials. I proceed to immediately tell people "I don't have cable. I haven't had cable in over 7 years. I don't want cable." They then go "well what do you do for fun? ???" And I tell them I read. Then comes the barrage of questions. Every so often though, I get one person that says to me "Oh well that's lame" and I just shrug my shoulders and end the conversation.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#27
I live in Florida. And Florida has an entirely screwed up education system thanks to the FCAT. And Jeb Bush and Rick Scott. Some areas in Florida are better than others but at 22 my median salary is twice that of half the population of where I live. So I suppose to the people who assume this are just highly uneducated. It throws me of every time someone asks. I guess I just need to move!
I live in Georgia, myself. I came here for graduate school (GA Tech), ended up with an underwater mortgage and huge student loan debt (everything I own broke during grad school and I took out student loans to pay for car repairs, new appliances, etc., plus I had massive vet bills last year), and kind of got stuck here. Well, at least I found a good job that's close to my condo. Never could've gotten a puppy, otherwise. Though when I watch or read news, it's national news (I stay away from the local stuff, too slanted in one direction).

I live in the county where they put stickers on textbooks saying something like "evolution is just a theory," then had to pay people $10 an hour to scrape them off when they were challenged in court and lost. My tax dollars at work!

People don't usually ask me what I'm reading. Maybe I just give off a vibe of "leave me the hell alone." I'm fine with that, honestly.
 

Danica

Queen of the boards!
Staff member
#28
I live in the county where they put stickers on textbooks saying something like "evolution is just a theory
this is pretty mind blowing for me as an educator. America sounds like a very interesting place. Maybe its just a matter of you guys having more people as you seem to have a pretty diversified bunch of people over there and stuff happening that would never fly here in the land of Oz
 

Laurentius

Super Moderator
Staff member
#29
In Dawkins newest book about evolution, the Greatest Show on Earth, he writes about a gallup poll a year prior to his publishing the book. I recall the majority of americans reject evolution and embrace the young earth theory the bible teaches ( 4-6k years old). Only in America tm
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#30
wow, I must be lucky, I never had anything like that happen to me.... any of it.
I brew beer for a living and out of 45 people, I'd say more than half don't have TV. what do we do with are time, theres a lot of fishers, hunter, one Rock Climber, bikers (cycle that is), and various other outdoor activites (plus the fact that its a brewery, so a lot of us always work overtime) , In addition the half that don't have TVs read a lot and have at least two separate book clubs, even most of the TV owners read a lot... maybe its my industry.... or maybe I am just lucky

I'd like to say that most of the school system stupidity with "evolution is just a theory" stickers is strictly on a state level, as I heard of these things at school where my teachers used it as political satire poignant to the lesson plans and my state growing up didn't have these issues. but my state was one of the first to institute the SOLs (Standards Of Learning, standardized testing required to pass a grade) which encourages the memorization of facts rather than productive long term learning, and critical thinking skills... whereas useful parts of the curriculum are often cut because its not on the test , and the SOLs are large and unwieldy wasting weeks worth of precious class time every year on a system that really just, "tests" to see if the teachers are being productive enough thereby inhibiting a students development.

yeah Id like to say school system stupidity like paying people $10 an hour to remove stickers that didn't need to be there in the first place is strictly on the state level, but its obvious each state in America has their own problems with Stupidity in the school system.
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#31
Yeah... the county I live is almost as bad. Teachers can't even say evolution! We have a "creation debate" for one class period and move on. Also, I attend the local state college and find math and science to be my favorite classes because in no way shape or form does Christianity take precedence over the curriculum. I'd have to say we are an honorary part of the bible belt.

You can ignore the fact I'm a bio major and an anti-theist. ;)
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#32
yeah Id like to say school system stupidity like paying people $10 an hour to remove stickers that didn't need to be there in the first place is strictly on the state level, but its obvious each state in America has their own problems with Stupidity in the school system.
It's county-level, in this case. Though sometimes this stupidity reaches the state level:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansas_evolution_hearings

It did not happen in my school, for which I am eternally grateful. The biology teacher said something like: "Many of you probably go to church, and you may hear different things about how life began there. But this is a science class and we are going to learn about science. End of discussion."

I hated that teacher for many reasons, but I really respect how he handled that issue.

For what it's worth, Georgia is now one of the best places in the country to study the origin of life and chemical evolution in graduate school (thanks in no small part to my PhD advisor and another member of my PhD committee getting massive grants from the National Science Foundation and NASA for this very reason). We always found that to be rather amusing.

Anyway, didn't mean to completely derail this discussion.
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#33
Its not derailed...I believe the lack of intellect in my area is the reason for this strange confusion I often encounter. Perhaps in the future I should just say "I like to read lotr" even though I've never read it and I don't care much for the black and white basic character type books.
 

moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
#34
this is pretty mind blowing for me as an educator. America sounds like a very interesting place. Maybe its just a matter of you guys having more people as you seem to have a pretty diversified bunch of people over there and stuff happening that would never fly here in the land of Oz

I could go on a rant right now, but it's probably best I don't. I'll just say that in a country where illegal immigration is the norm and politician's aren't doing anything to help solve the problem, you're going to have a much more diverse culture. American culture is constantly changing and evolving. Right now our culture is pretty messed up.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#35
I am from Europe, so I don't know all the details about the american school system, but this whole debate between science and creation theory baffles me to no end.

My first question is in regard to science. Why do you refer it in a singular form like this?

The reason I'm asking is because in my part of the Europe, we have no such subject.
What we have though are mandatory classes of biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics (natural sciences) and geography and history (social sciences) from the age of 10 to age of 18, that is from grade 6 to grade 9 in primary school , and all 4 years of high school. These are not optional.

We also have a religious education. Here, the situation is mixed. In some parts of the country it's mandatory and in some parts selective subject.

But that aside, what is important, is that matter of religions is thought in one subject, and science in others. These two don't clash as they do in USA. I wonder why.
I think it can be thought in separate way. Although I think kids would welcome one subject less if you know what I mean.

Now, I am really secular, so I personally think religious education has no business in public schools.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#36
I am from Europe, so I don't know all the details about the american school system, but this whole debate between science and creation theory baffles me to no end.

My first question is in regard to science. Why do you refer it in a singular form like this?

The reason I'm asking is because in my part of the Europe, we have no such subject.
What we have though are mandatory classes of biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics (natural sciences) and geography and history (social sciences) from the age of 10 to age of 18, that is from grade 6 to grade 9 in primary school , and all 4 years of high school. These are not optional.

We also have a religious education. Here, the situation is mixed. In some parts of the country it's mandatory and in some parts selective subject.

But that aside, what is important, is that matter of religions is thought in one subject, and science in others. These two don't clash as they do in USA. I wonder why.
I think it can be thought in separate way. Although I think kids would welcome one subject less if you know what I mean.

Now, I am really secular, so I personally think religious education has no business in public schools.
In part, it's a matter of semantics. "Science" in the US can refer to a class that encompasses multiple subjects (e.g. "earth science" might have some geology, some astronomy, some atmospheric sciences, etc., although in my experience, that's usually limited to lower grades -- say 7-9) and it also refers to individual classes like biology, chemistry, physics, or sometimes specialized classes like anatomy, animal behavior (that was really a class that was offered at my school), etc. (this is usually how it's done in high school, say grades 9-12, with some overlap).

In my own school, math was its own area; we stopped taking generic math classes in grade 7 or 8 and then you got into algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, etc., in separate classes. Geography, government, history, etc. were called "social studies" but were usually separate courses.

What you will find is that school systems vary widely throughout the country. What I have just said above might have been true for Independence, MO, in the 1990s, but I can't speak for anywhere else! More specialized classes may be open in larger schools (where they can afford to hire more faculty). Like we had the option of Spanish, French, or German, but other schools have Mandarin and so forth. You could also meet the requirements for graduation in multiple ways, so I ended up with 3 semesters of calculus but other people didn't get past Algebra I and/or geometry. It's really hard to generalize.

At any rate, we don't have religion classes in public schools. That is a pretty big no-no. But the US has a long and complicated history when it comes to religion and is much less homogeneous when it comes to religion than some other countries, and that may be part of it.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#37
Thanks for that detailed explanation Sneaky, I appreciate it.
At any rate, we don't have religion classes in public schools. That is a pretty big no-no.
That's what's contributing to the problem though, imo.
If you had a class where you could teach religion separately, that would free biology teachers to teach pure biology including evolution. One wouldnt clash with the other, and ultimately kids would come to their own conclusions.
It's really contradictory for me to say it, because I am not for teaching religion in schools (I am atheist), but I think you should always provide people, especially kids with as big amount of information as you can, so they can make up their own mind.
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#38
Yeah like Sneaky said "science" here is a multi class. In fact, until middle school there is no science class. Once you get to high school classes are generally more specific. When you get to college professors often tell you to forget everything you learned before college. As for religion classes...I think they don't do that because no one would take them seriously. That and the majority of Christian parents in America don't want their children learning about the other major religions. Especially in the south.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#39
Thanks for that detailed explanation Sneaky, I appreciate it.

That's what's contributing to the problem though, imo.
If you had a class where you could teach religion separately, that would free biology teachers to teach pure biology including evolution. One wouldnt clash with the other, and ultimately kids would come to their own conclusions.
It's really contradictory for me to say it, because I am not for teaching religion in schools (I am atheist), but I think you should always provide people, especially kids with as big amount of information as you can, so they can make up their own mind.
the Public School system is a government oraganized institute , and since it is public and the mandatory default for kids to be required to go to if their parents don't want to pay for private schooling, it has to abide by the rules for our government, ie. you cannot mix church and state. although this is set up to avoid the problems England had in the past where they had state enforced religions, too avoid this people have sought out to remove any mention of religion in classrooms...

HOWEVER, in my schooling in Social Studies class we went over religion for 3 weeks, if your parent didn't want you in the classroom during this time, you were excused. they had a sheet of disclaimer they had to read before the first class , and then they went over religion. because there are so many, the teacher asked (you didn't have to answer) what religion or sect you belonged too or what religions you were curious about, and those are the only ones we did. the Idea being that we learn about the diversity inside the class and then branch out to a brief overview of other religions.. It was very well done, only one student was not present and I never saw THAT many students in one class so eager to learn particularly when we got to religious orders unfamiliar to them....I wish it was longer, but that may have interfered with other studies.

Ohh and just a representation of what is different between GA and VA, We had one to two teachers from Kindergarten to 5th grade teaching the whole set of subjects. in 6th I was supposed to start Algebra, a language, Social Studies, and Earth Science.. but I moved from a suburban sprawl, to a more rural area (still suburbs there just more rural areas than suburbs) so Earth Sciences language and Algebra had to wait...
so by high school I had Algebra and Geometry, moved on to advanced algebra (our schools systems version of Trig) and one math class I don't remember, Than moved on to Calculus and could have taken Statistics, or Problem Solving?? I ended up with 6 years of Language(mostly French) and from Earth Sciences you could take more indepth versions, or Geology, Meterolgy, Chemistry, Chem 2, Biology, Bio 2, Physics, Physics 2, Statistics(yeah it could count as a math or a Science) and an elective that didn't count as a science. Astronomy. From Social Studies, I took....Social Studies, with Electives for the more specific subjects (like psychology, humanities, Criminal Justice, Etc.) but we did do two years mandatory Histroy and one Mandatory Geography
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#40
Damn... you went to a better school than me. We began standardized testing when I was in 3rd grade. After that it was basically all we studied. I had teachers that couldn't control their classrooms, were not qualified to teach their subject (pe coach teaching algebra), and substitutes for 2-3 months at a time. School is also designed to help the dumbest student graduate...it does not allow for highly intelligent children to be challenged. At least within the last 10 years in Florida. As for the separation of church and state....Well we all know they pick and choose those boundaries as they see fit.