Ever tell someone you like fantasy and...

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#41
ahh that explains everything.... I didn't have to do standardized testing, the grade below me were the first to be required it, we took them.... but they weren't required we didn't study for them, they didn't interrupt our schooling, except one hour periods ...I think 4 one hour periods every two years. so they were just there and no effect on our schooling.

I am a big hater of Standardized testing, and I think a lot of our more modern problems stem from them.
 

Danica

Queen of the boards!
Staff member
#42
it is really interesting to hear people's opinions on their own education as an educator. I feel very disappointed that teacher's weren't able to accommodate your needs Arya. I am really interested in the different subject structures. In aus we are moving towards (only a few years away) a national curriculum, every school (primary and secondary) will be teaching the same content and the same set of skills. this is pretty cool for me and students as no matter what school they attend they should know what is going on and have had similar sets of learning experiences (dependant on their teachers that is)/

I'll just say that in a country where illegal immigration is the norm and politician's aren't doing anything to help solve the problem, you're going to have a much more diverse culture.
Not sure what country you are talking about. Aus politicians at the moment are facing to be the biggest 'hard arse' on immigration in preparation for the upcoming election. A fact, which makes me sick, I wish the people of our country would be at least a little more compassionate.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#43
ahh that explains everything.... I didn't have to do standardized testing, the grade below me were the first to be required it, we took them.... but they weren't required we didn't study for them, they didn't interrupt our schooling, except one hour periods ...I think 4 one hour periods every two years. so they were just there and no effect on our schooling.

I am a big hater of Standardized testing, and I think a lot of our more modern problems stem from them.
I'm (gulp) more than a decade older than Arya Stark, so well before No Child Left Behind. My experience was probably totally different than what kids are doing in school these days. My mom was teaching 3rd grade right around the time the standardized tests rolled in and she hated teaching to the test. It's one reason she retired when she did (despite being quite a bit below the normal retirement age). We did do science, starting in 2nd or 3rd grade. And music and art and field trips and all kinds of other things that are probably getting cut these days.

I think my standardized testing was more like Bierschneeman's, every once in awhile but no studying and I don't remember any consequences (or lack thereof) relating to performance. I think I would hate having to STUDY for standardized tests. I always did very well at them without studying (ACT, SAT, GRE, etc.). So I would've been bored senseless if that's all my classes focused on.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#44
Sneaky Burrito
I think You and I are around the same age.... we were the guinea pigs for the standardized testing they have now, so maybe you and I doing so well on the tests might be why the bar is set it where it is...lol.
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#45
It was horrific. Even art classes were required to do fcat testing prep. And SATs? Ha! You don't get any kind of prep or information about the test unless you buy materials from your guidance counselor. To put things in perspective... there are kids in the local colleges that can't form correct sentences. Granted they don't make it far but they were actually granted entrance into college. I'm still baffled at how my basic classes had so many.
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#46
Danica, I was in ALPHA which was the best they offered. It was one class period where you learned whatever subject it was that year. It was very unorganized. Once you got to high school they gave you nothing. You had to take honors and Ap classes. Unfortunately those were the classes I experienced the worst teachers and removed myself from those classes. Once we had to write 3 10 page essays each on one chapter of A Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. They were due the next day. I wrote those papers. About 3 weeks layer we had not got them back so we asked... the teacher said she threw them all in the trash. I was outraged. I'd rather take the A in basic classes than deal with doing extra work to have it thrown in the trash.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#47
It was horrific. Even art classes were required to do fcat testing prep. And SATs? Ha! You don't get any kind of prep or information about the test unless you buy materials from your guidance counselor. To put things in perspective... there are kids in the local colleges that can't form correct sentences. Granted they don't make it far but they were actually granted entrance into college. I'm still baffled at how my basic classes had so many.
Oh, I know. I went back to get a second bachelor's degree (that was the one with the biology and chemistry double major) and the second school didn't want to count some of my general education classes from the first school (different names, but I would argue that "Expository Writing" is exactly the same damned thing as English I), so I had to take English I and II with kids from the Kansas City public school system. You know, they might've been bright, and I heard a lot of interesting ideas from them, but they were really lacking in basic skills that they should have picked up before coming to college. Peer review of their essays was excruciating. (I call them "kids" because they were, for the most part, a good 6-7 years younger than I was.)
 

Arya Stark

Philosophizes with Kellhus
#48
Oh how I loathe peer editing. Usually their papers are beyond help. Then they edit my paper to hell and I'm just like "lol wut" luckily alk I have now is calculus classes and Chem/bio classes. I'm taking world mythology and literature stats and pre cal now. After this semester I won't be dealing with it anymore!
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#49
Oh how I loathe peer editing. Usually their papers are beyond help. Then they edit my paper to hell and I'm just like "lol wut" luckily alk I have now is calculus classes and Chem/bio classes. I'm taking world mythology and literature stats and pre cal now. After this semester I won't be dealing with it anymore!
I never actually got any substantial editing in return (thankfully?). Once I did get a comment saying I'd formatted something incorrectly in a bibliography. (I hadn't.) Luckily the professor figured the situation out pretty quickly and I had a pretty easy time of it as a result.

It's interesting hearing about your experiences but I am glad to be done with school. 14.5 years of education post-high school is more than enough for anyone. Oops, meeting at work. Gotta go.
 

moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
#50
Not sure what country you are talking about. Aus politicians at the moment are facing to be the biggest 'hard arse' on immigration in preparation for the upcoming election. A fact, which makes me sick, I wish the people of our country would be at least a little more compassionate.
http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/...homeless-in-cities-all-over-the-united-states Read this article if you want a good example of heartlessness. The sad and brutal truth.


it is really interesting to hear people's opinions on their own education as an educator. I feel very disappointed that teacher's weren't able to accommodate your needs Arya. I am really interested in the different subject structures. In aus we are moving towards (only a few years away) a national curriculum, every school (primary and secondary) will be teaching the same content and the same set of skills. this is pretty cool for me and students as no matter what school they attend they should know what is going on and have had similar sets of learning experiences (dependant on their teachers that is)/
Personally I think the U.S. public school system is pretty ineffective. I would prefer a system that focuses on what a student is good at rather than just making them learn a bunch of stuff that they're never going to use and are going to forget right away anyway. In History and in English they think we need to teach all the kids this stuff this year and this year and this year. Chances are they're going to forget it all anyway, but they still need to learn it for their education because this is all important stuff. This is important and this is important and wait this is important too..... yes..... WA HA WA HA WA HA! Were going to overwhelm those kid's brains with information.... make them take a test every week. No, even better, every other day. We're going to make sure we teach them so much that they'll forget even the golden nuggets of information that they do need to learn and a lot of these supposed golden nuggets will be hidden by a bunch of lies - a wall of deceit if you will - because we don't want them to know the truth about history. Because if they knew the truth then they might start to question some of the agenda's our government and politicians have. We can't tell them the real reason the U.S. got out of the great depression because FDR is like the best president ever and we can't tell them that Communism has killed over a 100 million people (I think that's the number).

In one history class I took we really were taking a test every other day at one point. I did well, but it was awful having to study that much. No wonder the majority of public school students hate history. The way it's being taught is seriously flawed. I've heard that in some public schools, especially intercity ones they idolize such characters as Karl Marx and act like guns are bad (an example of an issue which should be a non-issue). I'm not sure how true this is though.

English class isn't really that much better in my opinion. I can understand why they would teach classics in schools, but I don't think analyzing literature and writing essays about it is giving our kids high hopes about reading. The majority of young people in this country don't like to read anymore; it really is quite sad. Chances are Hemmingway and The Brave New World is going to seriously bore your average high schooler. I have an aversion to classics now because of books like these. Instead of focusing so much on literature I think public school English should focus more on research based essays because knowing how to write well written, well thought out, and well researched essays in College is vital to surviving. In high school they barely taught us how to do good research.

My experiences with College English have been much more positive. This is because it was all focused on research based writing. You don't need to know or understand the deeper meaning of Cathcher and the Rye in College. This is a brutal truth that a lot of educators would disagree with me on, but it's true. I don't even remember doing very many research papers in High School. If they really wanted to prepare kids for College then having them do lots of research and essay writing would be far higher on the priority list then giving them some stupid multiple choice test about Lord of the Flies. You learn and work your brain a lot more by the very act of just planning an essay then you do filling out a bubble or answering questions.

This brings me to my last and most deriding criticism of public schools - testing. Kids do not to be tested about every little thing. Yes, I can understand this in math but in English and History it doesn't make since. I think they'll learn more and understand the content of the information a lot better if they have to write a few essay per semester about what they learned versus taking a test every week. For the most part Public School really didn't do much for me. All of this ranting kind of summarizes why.
 

Amaryllis

Journeyed there and back again
#51
I think if you're not willing to teach both religion and science in schools, any point you have regarding potential curriculum is moot due to crushing bias. I'm not particularly religious (I don't consider myself an atheist, much less an 'anti-theist' but I am definitely a front row member of the Church of Nothing in Particular), but it's going to pop up in kids' lives regardless of how much you might wish it otherwise, and why not have a presumably competent take on it, rather than someone's only exposure to religion being indignant articles on Huffington Post and snide Ricky Gervais tweets? That doesn't create free-thinkers. It just creates annoying people.

Not that I'm entirely sure how we got onto that, as it has dick all to do with why the U.S. has such a pathetic system of education. But anyway.
 

Danica

Queen of the boards!
Staff member
#52
The Aus national curriculum for history focuses on a few key content descriptors like 'who migrated to Australia and why' and the rest of the stuff we need to teach are skills like 'can create a time line' or 'can find information from a range of sources'.

Hopefully this will mean students aren't going through school needing to remember facts but are learning about information that matters and skills they need to succeed in life.
 

l3gacy

Dr. Awesomesauce
Staff member
#53
The Aus national curriculum for history focuses on a few key content descriptors like 'who migrated to Australia and why'
Criminals, that's why they are all half retarded.

Because iocane comes from Australia, as everyone knows, and Australia is entirely peopled with criminals, and criminals are used to having people not trust them, as you are not trusted by me, so I can clearly not choose the wine in front of you.
 

moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
#55
I think if you're not willing to teach both religion and science in schools, any point you have regarding potential curriculum is moot due to crushing bias. I'm not particularly religious (I don't consider myself an atheist, much less an 'anti-theist' but I am definitely a front row member of the Church of Nothing in Particular), but it's going to pop up in kids' lives regardless of how much you might wish it otherwise, and why not have a presumably competent take on it, rather than someone's only exposure to religion being indignant articles on Huffington Post and snide Ricky Gervais tweets? That doesn't create free-thinkers. It just creates annoying people.

Not that I'm entirely sure how we got onto that, as it has dick all to do with why the U.S. has such a pathetic system of education. But anyway.

I'm definitely not an advocator for turning public schools into Sunday school class (which I don't think your post is implying) but I will say that there is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching any religion in schools as long as they're not saying you should become a part of this religion or that Islam is so great, etc. In my senior year of high school in Contemporary World we learned about the world's major religions. It was mostly just an overview though.