Have You Read This Book?

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
I think I need to start reading the rest of these.
Yes, yes, yes :D
I suggest a re-read of The Last Wish. Those stories hold up well to re-reading. On the first read I didn't even notice they are re-telling of classic fairy tales (Beauty and the Beast, Snow White, Cinderella and others) set in Geralt's world and from his perspective. I just took them as Geralt's stories.
 

moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
@moonspawn
There was a question there? I didn't feel like I had something to respond to. :D
But if you insist...
I don't read authors from other places for diversity sake. I read because I want to see other perspectives, experience other cultures, get to know other tropes and mythologies. I find that fascinating. I am not interested in Australians for Australia sake, I am interested in everyone that is non-American, non-English. Gender comes second to that.
There's a great big world out there, and the same applies to fantasy literature. I like English and American writers just like you, but I am aware that's not the only worldview and only culture out there.

Btw, a Polish fantasy series is shaping out to be my favorite series ever. I'm talking about Witcher series of course. Now, I would never found it/read it if I wasn't paying attention to other fantasy books outside of Anglo-Saxon culture, would I? I might have played the game and call it quits on that ;)
Well.... Australia is an English speaking westernized country and is a melting pot like Britain and America so I don't think you're going to get anything that's fundamentally different like you would reading authors from Russia or Japan. Also just so you know 60 percent of fantasy authors from Australia are female. :p
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
Well.... Australia is an English speaking westernized country and is a melting pot like Britain and America so I don't think you're going to get anything that's fundamentally different like you would reading authors from Russia or Japan.
I'm actually going to have to agree, I've read a lot of Australian authors (mostly women), and the shared, English-speaking cultural heritage thing is pretty strong. A lot of them, if I hadn't known going in specifically that they were Australian, I would've just assumed British/Canadian/etc.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
Well.... Australia is an English speaking westernized country and is a melting pot like Britain and America so I don't think you're going to get anything that's fundamentally different like you would reading authors from Russia or Japan. Also just so you know 60 percent of fantasy authors from Australia are female. :p
I was counting on reading books that draw more from Aboriginal Australian's myths, than that whole English thing.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
I was counting on reading books that draw more from Aboriginal Australian's myths, than that whole English thing.
I think that'll be hard to find. 100% of the Australian fantasy I've read has been Western/English-tradition/whwatever you want to call it.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
I think that'll be hard to find. 100% of the Australian fantasy I've read has been Western/English-tradition/whwatever you want to call it.
Time to lump Australia with England and USA/Canada as anglo-saxon line?
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
I was counting on reading books that draw more from Aboriginal Australian's myths, than that whole English thing.
I have a soft spot for myths regardless of wherever they are (Aborigin, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Aztec, Norse, etc), but the only fantasy book I've read which incorporated Aussie Aborigin mythology into the story was Otherland by Tad Williams (ok, put that as fantasy/sci-fi), and he's American.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
Anyone read the Dragon Brigade series by Margaret Weis and Robert Krammes? Tor sent me volume 3 so I am weighing buying used copies of volumes 1 and 2 to read first.

I have not ever read anything by Margaret Weis. All I know about her is that she had something to do with Dragonlance RPGs (not something I was ever into) and that she was born in the same town I was (she's a little older than my dad, I wonder if he ever knew her -- I'll have to ask).

Anyway, flipping it open to random pages, there's nothing obviously objectionable. But I don't really want to start with book 3.
 

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
Anyone read the Dragon Brigade series by Margaret Weis and Robert Krammes? Tor sent me volume 3 so I am weighing buying used copies of volumes 1 and 2 to read first.

I have not ever read anything by Margaret Weis. All I know about her is that she had something to do with Dragonlance RPGs (not something I was ever into) and that she was born in the same town I was (she's a little older than my dad, I wonder if he ever knew her -- I'll have to ask).

Anyway, flipping it open to random pages, there's nothing obviously objectionable. But I don't really want to start with book 3.
I have read the first Dragonships book by Weiss and Hickman and it was decent and it is apparently the weakest of the 3 released according to Amazon and Goodreads. It was good enough that I bought the second book and will get around to it and if the second is as good as the first I will pick up the third when I catch it cheap. But as long as it entertains me I tend to like a book.
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
I have a soft spot for myths regardless of wherever they are (Aborigin, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Aztec, Norse, etc), but the only fantasy book I've read which incorporated Aussie Aborigin mythology into the story was Otherland by Tad Williams (ok, put that as fantasy/sci-fi), and he's American.
Cloud Atlas had some storylines that were playing in that area.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/49628.Cloud_Atlas?from_search=true

IMO a good book, however - and that is IMO seldom the case - the movie actually managed to close the "loose ends" of the story better.

Best regards,
Andy
 

Khartun

Journeyed there and back again
I was looking at Alucard's post in the Firesale thread and wondering if anyone has read Cryptonomicon. It sounds interesting.
 

atheling

A Poet of the Khaiem
I was looking at Alucard's post in the Firesale thread and wondering if anyone has read Cryptonomicon. It sounds interesting.
I have, a while ago so I don't remember it perfectly. I basically liked it. The style was somewhat rambling at times, tending to get lost on little rabbit trails, but I remember him basically keeping it moving and slowly, slowly connecting the various plot lines (slowly, though, as I recall, requiring a bit of patience from the reader), which take place decades apart (contemporary and World War 2).

Unless, of course, it turns out I have halucinated all of that and the book was actually nothing like that at all :)
 

bobo

Knows how to pronounce Kvothe
Has anyone read the Laundry Files series by Charles Stross? Heard its supposed to be urban fantasy in the vein of the Dresden Files.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
Has anyone read the Laundry Files series by Charles Stross? Heard its supposed to be urban fantasy in the vein of the Dresden Files.
Never heard of it, truthfully. Might have to check it out once I get done with Garrett, PI, though. Am partway through the Merchant Princes series by Stross, although that is fantasy with a dose of economics. Stross seems to have some range, so maybe I would like it (I've also read a sci fi short story by him, which was totally different from the Merchant Princes books).
 

Khartun

Journeyed there and back again
I have, a while ago so I don't remember it perfectly. I basically liked it. The style was somewhat rambling at times, tending to get lost on little rabbit trails, but I remember him basically keeping it moving and slowly, slowly connecting the various plot lines (slowly, though, as I recall, requiring a bit of patience from the reader), which take place decades apart (contemporary and World War 2).

Unless, of course, it turns out I have halucinated all of that and the book was actually nothing like that at all :)
Thanks for the input.
 

wakarimasen

Journeyed there and back again
I read Cryptonomicon some time ago. Old Stephenson is my second favourite sci-fi author, very polite man as well (at least at book signings!)
Cryptonomicon marks an evolution in Neal's writing I'd say. It's when he starts to move away from the more cyberpunk settings of Snow Crash and Diamond Age and really begins to stretch his legs as a writer. In his own words he's not sure why people call it sci-fi other than it is fiction with science in it. It is a split-time story and a pretty good page turning adventure, but he does like to take you down interesting anecdotal sidetracks, to do with painting the history of the moment and the character's personalities. You'll learn quite a lot about the development of the computer for instance (bear in mind Mr. S is a proper nerd, a physicist who writes his first draft by hand in fountain pen and has an opinion on BeOS). The same characters' families then turn up in his rather epic System of The World Series. Which I highly recommend.
 

atheling

A Poet of the Khaiem
I read Cryptonomicon some time ago. Old Stephenson is my second favourite sci-fi author, very polite man as well (at least at book signings!)
Cryptonomicon marks an evolution in Neal's writing I'd say. It's when he starts to move away from the more cyberpunk settings of Snow Crash and Diamond Age and really begins to stretch his legs as a writer. In his own words he's not sure why people call it sci-fi other than it is fiction with science in it. It is a split-time story and a pretty good page turning adventure, but he does like to take you down interesting anecdotal sidetracks, to do with painting the history of the moment and the character's personalities. You'll learn quite a lot about the development of the computer for instance (bear in mind Mr. S is a proper nerd, a physicist who writes his first draft by hand in fountain pen and has an opinion on BeOS). The same characters' families then turn up in his rather epic System of The World Series. Which I highly recommend.
Yes. What he said :)
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
Thanks for the Cryptonomicon suggestion. Have added it to my TBR list.