Have You Read This Book?

Cyphon

Journeyed there and back again
Has anyone read Shadows of the Apt by Adrian Tchaikovsky? I don't know a lot about the series but some of it sounded interesting but I wanted to get some input before diving into a 10 book adventure.
 

ReguIa

Journeyed there and back again
Just read that Tad Williams has plans to return to his world from Memory, Sorrow and Thorn and it got me thinking. As I'm planning to get into 3 other unfinished series after I'm done with Words of Radiance, I'd like to squeeze in a finished series at one point. So, is it a good choice to pick up The Dragonbone Chair?
 

TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
Just read that Tad Williams has plans to return to his world from Memory, Sorrow and Thorn and it got me thinking. As I'm planning to get into 3 other unfinished series after I'm done with Words of Radiance, I'd like to squeeze in a finished series at one point. So, is it a good choice to pick up The Dragonbone Chair?
I've been about 200 pages into book 2 of this series for about 3 months now. It's not that I'm not enjoying it, I'm just struggling to find the motivation to carry on reading it. I always seem to start something new which takes priority over cracking on with Memory Sorrow Thorn.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
Just read that Tad Williams has plans to return to his world from Memory, Sorrow and Thorn and it got me thinking. As I'm planning to get into 3 other unfinished series after I'm done with Words of Radiance, I'd like to squeeze in a finished series at one point. So, is it a good choice to pick up The Dragonbone Chair?
Regula, you asked "So, is it a good choice to pick up The Dragonbone Chair?" and since no one has answered that directly yet, I can say that yes it is, as it's a complete story. The ending has been good enough for lots of people for many years, including Tad Williams. It's a traditional, "That's all, folks" epic fantasy ending. But there are story arcs he can go back to IMO and flesh them out. This is his magnum opus so it's easy to see why he would go back, although I always thought he had another epic in him. Plus what if he doesn't actually write more? You'll have missed out.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
Regula, you asked "So, is it a good choice to pick up The Dragonbone Chair?" and since no one has answered that directly yet, I can say that yes it is, as it's a complete story. The ending has been good enough for lots of people for many years, including Tad Williams. It's a traditional, "That's all, folks" epic fantasy ending. But there are story arcs he can go back to IMO and flesh them out. This is his magnum opus so it's easy to see why he would go back, although I always thought he had another epic in him. Plus what if he doesn't actually write more? You'll have missed out.
I agree with this opinion. It is one of the better series I've read. The characterization is really strong in my opinion. I'd definitely recommend it.
 

TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
I agree with this opinion. It is one of the better series I've read. The characterization is really strong in my opinion. I'd definitely recommend it.
I agree, the characterisation is strong. I'll definitely pick this series back up soon - will have to wait until the little'un is in her own room though ..
 

ReguIa

Journeyed there and back again
The characterization is really strong
This is what I've heard and what has gotten me interested in it. I flew through The Way of Kings in under 2 weeks which must be a record for me considering how long it is, and my god there is so much information in it that I felt slightly overwhelmed after I finished it.
I'm reading Word of Radiance now, but I'm going to take my time with this one. After that I want to read something with a little smaller scope but still something with good characters. Also the oldest work I've read lately is Ender's Game and that was one and a half years ago. The Dragonbone Chair is from 88 so I'm thinking it could be a good fit.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
I agree, the characterisation is strong. I'll definitely pick this series back up soon - will have to wait until the little'un is in her own room though ..
Hehe. I actually read a lot more now with the baby sleeping in her own room. I totaly get what you mean. Also more time for ... other activities.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
So, this is the first time I've used this thread as it's intended, and that's because one of the top things on my reading bucket list is reading something by Connie Willis. I just finished the sample of Doomsday Book, which I think won her one of her Hugos, right? Have you read this book? How was it? Do you have a suggestion for another of her's instead, like To Say Nothing Of the Dog? Thanks.
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
So, this is the first time I've used this thread as it's intended, and that's because one of the top things on my reading bucket list is reading something by Connie Willis. I just finished the sample of Doomsday Book, which I think won her one of her Hugos, right? Have you read this book? How was it? Do you have a suggestion for another of her's instead, like To Say Nothing Of the Dog? Thanks.
I read To Say Nothing of the Dog a long time ago - something like 15 years. Don't remember all that much, really - the plot had something to do with time travel and the writing was mildly amusing. The book didn't set my world on fire or anything, but it was entertaining to read. By all means try out one of her books - most people I know who read To say Nothing of the Dog seemed to like it.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
I read To Say Nothing of the Dog a long time ago - something like 15 years. Don't remember all that much, really - the plot had something to do with time travel and the writing was mildly amusing. The book didn't set my world on fire or anything, but it was entertaining to read. By all means try out one of her books - most people I know who read To say Nothing of the Dog seemed to like it.
Thanks ofer, I'm going to sample it.

One more request for opinions and that's Gardens of Stone, which I'm only considering because it's on Kindle Unlimited and I've always been curious. I did a search and saw ofer and griffin's comments, which were not positive. If it's got lots of action I could probably read it. What say the group?
 
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ofer

Journeyed there and back again
One more request for opinions and that's Gardens of Stone, which I'm only considering because it's on Kindle Unlimited and I've always been curious. I did a search and saw ofer and griffin's comments, which were not positive. If it's got lots of action I could probably read it. What say the group?
Got nothing much to add, really. The worldbuilding did show some promise, but I couldn't get past the first 200 pages (and I tried twice) - lots of infodumping and what I perceived to be unrealistic characters and dialogues. Didn't care much for the writing style, either. As for action - the first scene in the book is a battle scene but it didn't feel like it.

On the bright side, since then I noticed a few comments on other boards regarding this book - some saying exactly what I just said, but others saying that if you persevere past most of the first book, the trilogy is rewarding. I guess this is one of those love them or hate them books.
 

Haven

Became a Faceless Man
One more request for opinions and that's Gardens of Stone
I've read all three books, and I was pretty satisfied with the trilogy overall.

@ofer is spot on with the fact that it's an infodump, but I tend to like books where the author invests significant time and effort in worldbuilding,
and this is definitely one of those books.

The best way to describe these books would be, decadent fantasy I guess. Vast empires, long lived species..the sheer weight of history is palpable in the pages. It's almost like reading a good Egyptian documentary by National Geographic :p
Plotwise its the old bad guy wanting power spiel, albeit in a more roundabout fashion, which is kinda disappointing.
The protagonists are pretty OK, the antagonists are suitably evil and conniving.

But where it really stands out is the sheer detail and depth of the world. He could probably spin a couple more trilogies from the mere mentions of most of the places.

Unfortunately the ending of the third book was pretty meh, and it didn't really live up to the responsibility of being last in a trilogy. But I remember the author saying
that there would be more books, and the story of the main characters is far from resolved anyway.

In many ways this trilogy mirrors LOTR...it's just one small event in the grander scheme of things, but which happens to take 3 books to tell.
That's probably the best way I can explain the size of the worldbuilding.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
Thank you ofer and Haven for all that info. I'm going to read it as I like worldbuilding and infodumps. I think. Guess I'll find out. Besides, analyzing a new author's style is my favorite pastime.