Have You Read This Book?

Khartun

Journeyed there and back again
"Nothing confuses an officer like violently agreeing with him"

Have you read the book this great line is from? I laughed. Out load. It's a well known book here that I'm finally reading. No prizes for this contest, just a hearty well done and one of these (does an OK sign with right hand).
I had to Google this to find it but it just so happens that I won the first two books of this series from a contest. I just got them in the mail yesterday.
 

Ryan W. Mueller

Journeyed there and back again
Cool Ryan. And Fantam, I've moved on to the second book. I didn't see the end coming, that they're going back to Vordan. Thinking about it, I guess they've sort of used up all the desert intrigue but I like desert settings in a fantasy book. To be clear, I'm referring to The Thousand Names by Django Wexler, for me a book that just never let me down with any of the plot devices that I've come to fear from contemporary epic fantasy.
I liked the first book. I thought the second book was amazing. There's less of a military focus, but it's still there.
 

Kalavan

Journeyed there and back again
I liked the first book. I thought the second book was amazing. There's less of a military focus, but it's still there
The second book is probably better that the first, and Raesinia is a brilliant new POV - with the greatest first appearance I've read in a long time. But I really missed the military aspect, and therefore I didn't enjoyed it as much as the first.

But the third book, where the military and the political focus are perfectly balanced, is my favourite one, and the fourth one is the book I'm most eagerly awaiting for the 2016 together with Stormlight Archive 3.

Back on topic, I'm planning to read The Powder Mage trilogy, how does it compare to The Shadow Campaigns? Any other flintlock fantasy series worth considering?
 

Griffin

Journeyed there and back again
how does it compare to The Shadow Campaigns?
It barely has anything of the strategy and tactics displayed in The Shadow Campaigns. The magic is very much on the forefront from the beginning. At into that the intriguing first chapter that sets the stage for the entire series and you'll have a different, but imo rewarding flintlock read.
 

Ryan W. Mueller

Journeyed there and back again
Back on topic, I'm planning to read The Powder Mage trilogy, how does it compare to The Shadow Campaigns? Any other flintlock fantasy series worth considering?
Faster pace. More magical action. Some military focus, but not quite as much. The writing is competent but nothing special. Wexler's probably a better writer than McClellan, but McClellan does know how to tell a story that keeps you reading. If you also like Sanderson, you'll probably like McClellan.

Both series are some of my favorites, though they approach the sub-genre in different ways.

In flintlock fantasy, I've also enjoyed Weeks's Lightbringer series. The flintlock aspect doesn't play as prominent role, but it's still very good.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
The second book is probably better that the first, and Raesinia is a brilliant new POV - with the greatest first appearance I've read in a long time. But I really missed the military aspect, and therefore I didn't enjoyed it as much as the first.

But the third book, where the military and the political focus are perfectly balanced, is my favourite one, and the fourth one is the book I'm most eagerly awaiting for the 2016 together with Stormlight Archive 3.

Back on topic, I'm planning to read The Powder Mage trilogy, how does it compare to The Shadow Campaigns? Any other flintlock fantasy series worth considering?
Thanks Kalavan and Khartun and Ryan, I'm about done with The Shadow Throne and Kalavan, I too am put off by the interminable politics. Now the story does advance quite a bit, I'll give it that. Kalavan, your comment about book three convinces me to buy it. I certainly want to stay in this brilliantly imagined world but I really need more military action again.
 
So I was looking around on Goodreads for a new book to read and this one popped up in my recommendations - Free the Darkness (King's Dark Tidings 1) by Kel Kade. The premise seems nice - and its rated well on goodreads. Is it worth a read?? Im currently more into Coming of Age type stories with a bit of magic.
 

TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
So I was looking around on Goodreads for a new book to read and this one popped up in my recommendations - Free the Darkness (King's Dark Tidings 1) by Kel Kade. The premise seems nice - and its rated well on goodreads. Is it worth a read?? Im currently more into Coming of Age type stories with a bit of magic.
Never heard of it. Coming of age fantasy with a bit of magic though, you could try:
Prince of Thorns (Broken Empire Trilogy) by Mark Lawrence (it fits the bill but in the darkest possible sense)
Chronicles of the Unhewn Throne by Brian Staveley - I'm currently on the last book. The magic isn't 'in your face', and it has a lot of fans (although it's far from the best thing I've ever read)
The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb (and maybe other Hobb series, but this is the only one I've read)
 
Never heard of it. Coming of age fantasy with a bit of magic though, you could try:
Prince of Thorns (Broken Empire Trilogy) by Mark Lawrence (it fits the bill but in the darkest possible sense)
Chronicles of the Unhewn Throne by Brian Staveley - I'm currently on the last book. The magic isn't 'in your face', and it has a lot of fans (although it's far from the best thing I've ever read)
The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb (and maybe other Hobb series, but this is the only one I've read)
Already read both the Broken Empire and Unhewn Throne series. Definitely solid picks. This isnt the first time someone has recommended the farseer trilogy to me - I'll give it a shot.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
[QUOTE="TomTB, post: 56037, member: 26563]
The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb (and maybe other Hobb series, but this is the only one I've read)[/QUOTE]

I KNOW I'm in the big time minority on this.The Farseer is high up on almost everyones list.On Ben's top 50 Epics for example it is #14 and the public vote is like around 450-150. I quit after book one because I didn't like it. I DO thinkbthe wit was a tremendous and fascinating character but the rest of the book was aboutvpoor likeable Fitz getting peed on by the world on his GOOD days. On the bad days he was getting crapped on. No matter what he did it seemed like he lost most every time.To me it was almost gothic in atmosphere. Parts were interesting but I also thought it dragged in other parts. People bag on books that aren't "realistic" when things usually turn out well but I never read things about books being unrealistic when just about everything sucks.

Minds are getting erased although we never learn much about it in THIS book at least. Personally, I thought the way they kill the bad guy in the end was dumb within the context of the book for some reason.

I saw nothing new and exciting about the book. Seems like it is always recommended like just now. I'm not asking in a cynical fashion or anything like that. I know everything is subjective. I'm not putting it down in any way. It was well written of course but didn't appeal to me and I won't read any more but I also sincerely wonder what in the world did I miss??
 

Fantam

Journeyed there and back again
[QUOTE="TomTB, post: 56037, member: 26563]
The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb (and maybe other Hobb series, but this is the only one I've read)
....I also sincerely wonder what in the world did I miss??[/QUOTE]

I doubt whether you missed anything, but I enjoyed seeing how Fitz came to terms with his background and the moral implications of learning a somewhat dubious trade.

I also liked seeing his character develop and how he learned to deal with difficult situations. Finally, I thought the plot was pretty reasonable, had a suitably unlikeable villain and an interesting threat to Fitz's kingdom to encounter in the sequels.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
So I was looking around on Goodreads for a new book to read and this one popped up in my recommendations - Free the Darkness (King's Dark Tidings 1) by Kel Kade. The premise seems nice - and its rated well on goodreads. Is it worth a read?? Im currently more into Coming of Age type stories with a bit of magic.
One less known coming-of-age/thief themed fantasy series - Queen`s Thief by Megan Whalen Turner. 4 books out of 5 are out, and each of them is more or less different from the others when it comes to tone and plot, while still following the same storyline. It's very refreshing series.

Another one which isn't so well known is The Heartstrikers series - two books out so far, the first one is called "Good Dragons Finish Last". It's very, very nice Urban Fantasy about a dragon who is forced to live in his human form and learn how to be more mean to the world. Both main characters are like 25 years old, but it feels quite coming-of-age/young-adultish due to the fact that the main male dragon character is in something like his teen dragon years.

From the more established authors/series you could go for things like Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson, The Magicians by Lev Grossman, The Night Angel trilogy or The Lightbringer series both by Brent Weeks, Gentlemen Bastards series also have strong coming-of-age elements in them, but it's somewhat differently written when it comes to timelines.

And of course the series suggested by the other members are top-notch themselves. :)
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
I doubt whether you missed anything, but I enjoyed seeing how Fitz came to terms with his background and the moral implications of learning a somewhat dubious trade.
I think this was actually a problem I had with the series. He learned how to be an assassin, but he didn't kill too many people.

One job he had, he talked his way out of killing a woman. I'm a bit vague on the details because it's been a few years. And then he like dropped poisoned bread to kill Forged people, which isn't really something you need assassin training for.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
@Fantam

I don't really remember any significant changes in his character, but it was 3-4 years ago that I read it and I only read the one book which I did not particularly enjoy. Even so, with someone liking all those things you mentioned, it seems like it would be thought of as a "solid"series. Or perhaps a "good" one but not a "top" series. I don't see where it stands out from the many other books fitting that description?
 
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Fantam

Journeyed there and back again
@Fantam

....it seems like it would be thought of as a "solid"series. Or perhaps a "good" one but not a "top" series. I don't see where it stands out from the many other books fitting that description?
I have also only read that one book so far, but felt that Hobb wrote well which was probably part of why I enjoyed it.

Perhaps it does not stand out from many other similar books today, which concentrate mainly on a single poi. But I notice that it was written about 20 years ago when less fantasy was around, so maybe that was one of the reasons it became so popular.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
The thing with Robin Hobb is that she really has a unique approach toward the genre.

When I first read The Farseer trilogy I was very dissapointed of how she handled Fitz`s fate and the story as a whole. If someone checks my BFB Forum ratings - this trilogy got 6.5 or 7/10, which was my lowest score I think. I've made a special note in my mind back then to give her the lowest number compared to my other ratings - she pissed me off that much.

But then about a year later I've find out that Fitz`s story is of the kind that grows on a person. Like a lichen or moss, as Hadrian would've said. :p After reading many, many fantasy series, I've never found an author who uses his/her words in the way Robin Hobb does, which is a very unique and beautiful way of telling a story in my opinion.

So I've decided to give her a second chance. It was worth it I think. I wasn't totally impressed with her later Fitz trilogies( well, the last one I liked more that it probably deserves tbh), but it was refreshing and relaxing to immerse myself into her books. They are so soothing for some reason.

Sometimes a person needs his guilty pleasure and mine appears to be stories told in a deliberately slower pace - like The Wheel of Time, The Dagger and the Coin, The Farseer Trilogy, ASoIaF( the first two-three books anyways, the 4th and the 5th were total crap), maybe even The Kingkiller Chronicles have its place in that particular list.

What I mean is - it's all nice and good with authors like Brandon Sanderson, Scott Lynch, Mark Lawrence and so on who are like "action, action, action", but it's nice when you change pace with differently told stories like those or Robert Jordan, Daniel Abraham and Robin Hobb, and I am glad that there are stories like theirs out there in the open - stories which feel like fairytales for grown-ups. Even if those stories are lacking in some aspects, they are superior in many others, so if you are into the old-school fantasy ways - it evens out in the end. :)
 
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ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
Have you tried Memory, Sorrow and Thorn by Tad Williams, which starts off slowly and then builds up into an exciting read ?
In fact I am just reading that. :)

I am still at the beggining of the story
Little after Simon and his friend try to fake their way into the military, but are rejected by the commander.
, but the narrative is going in a very delightful manner.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
Sorry for the double post, but I have a question. :)

One of my guilty pleasures are the MMO games like LOTRO and WoW. LOTRO because it's immensely beautifully done, following the story of my fdavorite movie trilogy and one of my favorite books, WoW because it was the first MMO I was able to play as a kid and a teenager.

And sincew we discussed the palate cleansing books some weeks back, I would like to ask if anyone have read the WoW universe books which Blizzard are publishing from time to time. I remember reading one of them when I was in high school, a decade or so ago, but I cannot recall very much of it - it was about dragons, and Thrall or something. I think it was The Day of the Dragon. I am not sure, since it was my little brother`s purchase and I was just curious back then, not really invested into that particular book franchise.

So are the WoW books any good as palate cleansing thingies between better series? Raymond E. Feist kind of averageness would be acceptable I think, but if the books are worse.. then.. it won't be cool. :)
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
Sometimes a person needs his guilty pleasure and mine appears to be stories told in a deliberately slower pace - like The Wheel of Time, The Dagger and the Coin, The Farseer Trilogy, ASoIaF( the first two-three books anyways, the 4th and the 5th were total crap), maybe even The Kingkiller Chronicles have its place in that particular list.

What I mean is - it's all nice and good with authors like Brandon Sanderson, Scott Lynch, Mark Lawrence and so on who are like "action, action, action", but it's nice when you change pace with differently told stories like those or Robert Jordan, Daniel Abraham and Robin Hobb, and I am glad that there are stories like theirs out there in the open - stories which feel like fairytales for grown-ups. Even if those stories are lacking in some aspects, they are superior in many others, so if you are into the old-school fantasy ways - it evens out in the end. :)
Personally, I'd considered the slower stuff the real quality, and the "action action action" a guilty pleasure... not that it's always pleasurable.