How many languages do you speak?

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
#1
I am watching a Spanish TV show and it got me wondering what languages do you speak, what are they, and how well?

My native language is English because I am from the USA. I can read and understand Spanish good enough to enjoy it and I can speak it as well but I am slow at it and I am sure I sound like a 3-4 year old speaking. But I know could get by if necessary.

I plan on learning another language and was considering Bosnian because we have a huge Bosnian population where I live and I'm going back to school to be a nurse and figured it would be handy but there are no audio CDs for it. I might go for German next.

I'm not sure why but I really enjoy learning another language and actually look forward to opportunities.
 
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Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#2
I plan on learning another language and was considering Bosnian because we have a huge Bosnian population where I live
Ha! :D St. Louis is it? ;)

My native language is Bosnian. Which basically translates to Serbian and Croatian as well. It's all one language, only dialects are different. It's equivalent to how American English and British English differ. @sopranosfan if you ever need a tip or some explanation feel free to let me know, if you end up learning it. Slavic languages are hard to learn for people of anglo-saxon background. Rule of thumb is if you learn Russian first, all others come easier. Or at least that's what I've been told.

I know English on a slightly lower level then my native tongue. I can also read and communicate with basic Japanese.

The languages I have tried learning are French, German and Spanish.
I would love to learn French well enough to be able to read books. Nothing from German every seems to stick with me and I have a dislike for the phonetics of it.
I have a weird feeling I could learn Spanish in half a year. It just feels like an easy language to learn but I never fully committed to it.

Edit: In my part of the world, the most useful language you can learn besides English, is German. We have strong connections with Austria and Germany. Third best to know might be Swedish.
 

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
#3
Ha! :D St. Louis is it? ;)
.
Nope, but it is another refugee city, Bowling Green, Kentucky. It is probably one of the smallest ones but the schools here always post messages in English, Spanish, and Bosnian. We also probably have the state's only Bosnian Islamic church.

. @sopranosfan if you ever need a tip or some explanation feel free to let me know, if you end up learning it. Slavic languages are hard to learn for people of anglo-saxon background. Rule of thumb is if you learn Russian first, all others come easier. Or at least that's what I've been told..
Thanks and I will. I just wish there was a good audio course to use. I love the course I am using for Spanish because a native speaker says the Spanish word and it makes it a lot easier. There was really only one book on Amazon that looked promising. I may pick it up and try to at least learn the basics.
 
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Hand of Fear

Journeyed there and back again
#4
I'm Welsh and I'm ashamed to say I can't speak my own language, just as I started primary school there was some kind of ruling change over here to say all Welsh Schools had to teach English instead (or something similar).

So I can only speak English, but when me and my wife have our first kid he/she will be going to a Welsh school.
 

Amaryllis

Journeyed there and back again
#5
Only English for me. I'd absolutely love to learn either Russian or Mandarin (or both, because if I do anything, it's 'dream big'), but it's a struggle with myself when the learning programs for them are $500 at the minimum, and ramp up to like $1900 for 'the whole thing' -- and even those have dubious reviews -- and the nearest school that teaches either is like 130 miles away. At those rates, I feel like it'd almost be as cost effective to just get temporary visas to China or some place in the FSU and annoy the natives into teaching me. I've heard both languages are extremely hard for native English speakers, but you know, nothing worth having is easy, and all those other encouraging sayings.

I do think both of those cultures have a lot of history and nuance that never gets properly represented here in western media. As someone who dreams of being a writer one day, this interests me a lot (plus, I just like seeing other perspectives).
 

atheling

A Poet of the Khaiem
#6
Used to speak French fairly well, years ago. I could probably pick it up again if I tried, but there are no French speakers around here (also, I would have a number of odd habits picked up from when I learned it: I learned Belgian French). No shortage of Spanish speakers around here, tho, so there's an idea.
 

Griffin

Journeyed there and back again
#8
I'm from Flanders (dutch-speaking part of Belgium) where we are quite proud of our multilingual education. That way I've learned French since I was 10 years old and later on (in high school) I learned English (although games, movies and the internet did waaa-aaay more for my understanding than the boring grammatical teachings) and German.

I'll admit my French and German are very rusty (particularly the vocabulary), since I haven't used that in quite a while (7 years). But I'd love to learn Spanish, since I have some Spanish heritage.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#9
Nope, but it is another refugee city, Bowling Green, Kentucky. It is probably one of the smallest ones but the schools here always post messages in English, Spanish, and Bosnian. We also probably have the state's only Bosnian Islamic church.
I had no idea, Kentucky of all places :D I knew about community of Bosnians in Chicago and St. Louis, but not Kentucky. When we were at our biggest number in 1991, we were only 4 million in the whole state, so I'm always surprised at the places we end up in.

Thanks and I will. I just wish there was a good audio course to use. I love the course I am using for Spanish because a native speaker says the Spanish word and it makes it a lot easier. There was really only one book on Amazon that looked promising. I may pick it up and try to at least learn the basics.
I found this: http://mylanguages.org/bosnian_audio.php
The are a few audio interactive lessons, like this: http://mylanguages.org/multimedia/bosnian_audio_animals.php
There are a bunch of languages there :) What a find :D

I understand the importance of audio and video lessons. Heck, whole lot of my English knowledge came from watching Cartoon Network when I was a kid, and movies when I was a teen. We don't dub foreign program in our country. Everything is subtitled.

Btw few years ago there was a big to do about a book written by one emeritus professor of English language. It's called "Bosnian for Foreigners". It's supposedly very good. It's a 700+ page book: http://midhatridjanovic.ba/book-preview/
The price is crazy though, 60 euros. I don't know what the fuck the publisher is thinking.

I'd absolutely love to learn either Russian
Me toooooo :D All that non-translated fantasy and sci-fi literature waiting to be read :)
 

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
#11
I had no idea, Kentucky of all places :D I knew about community of Bosnians in Chicago and St. Louis, but not Kentucky. When we were at our biggest number in 1991, we were only 4 million in the whole state, so I'm always surprised at the places we end up in.
I worked with a guy from Bosnia in the mid to late 90s and one of us asked him why of all the places did so many come to a small town in the middle of nowhere and he explained that there were only so many cities that they could choose from and we were one. It is kind of neat living here because we have a lot of diversity here because we are a a refugee city for a lot of places. We have an international festival where we celebrate other cultures which is fun to go to.
Only English for me. I'd absolutely love to learn either Russian or Mandarin (or both, because if I do anything, it's 'dream big'), but it's a struggle with myself when the learning programs for them are $500 at the minimum, and ramp up to like $1900 for 'the whole thing' .
If you commute very far I strongly recommend a series called Behind the Wheel. They are like $30-$50 a piece on Amazon and they have a lot of languages. I have taught myself pretty much with that and reading Spanish and watching Spanish TV, and I only watch that when my wife isn't around because she can't speak it and I guess she finds it boring.:confused:
 

Goldensun

Killed in the battle against the Mad King
#12
I took three semesters of German, but sadly I don't remember very much. Hard to keep up practice. Tricky language to learn (which is odd because it's close to English in a lot of ways).
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#14
I do like learning languages!

My mother tongue is German, although I now speak English all day long.
I can also reasonably communicate in French and Spanish (learned French at school for some years, and worked in Spain for 2 years).
Have been learning Chinese (Mandarin) for the last 15 years, but as I do that as a hobby, my knowledge is limited (and I only do speak, not read or write). My kids like to make fun of my bad Chinese pronunciation (my wife is from Taiwan, so she speaks Chinese with them in order for them to learn it well). Unfortunately, as she has studied in Germany and we have lived in Germany for the last 15 years, we speak German at home most of the time.

Oh, and I also learned Russian at school as an elective for 2 years. That was in 1985, when I thought that with Russian, I would be able to communicate in half of the world. Was not too unhappy when history proved that notion wrong, and have forgotten all my Russian apart from a few phrases. Other than that, some phrases of Bahasa Malaysia (am living in Malaysia), some Catalan, Cantonese, Japanese and what I remember from my few years of High school Latin (though that is not language you can speak often.)

Maybe I should try to pick up Esperanto, guess I have some of the basic prerequisites :)

Best regards,
Andy
 

Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#15
English, Hindi and German (to a decently high level). The languages that I've always wanted to learn are French, Russian, Arabic and Japanese.