I like *this* so recommend me.....

#21
Thanks. I think I'll try The name of the wind.

It seems I should try to continue the Malazan saga too, perhaps I was just too impatient. :) (To be honest, the second half of the first book was very good, but the following book just seemed too impersonal to me.)
 
#22
About Malazan: trust ben on this one, it gets really awesome. Book 3 is probably the best, so I would reccomend you at least try to read up until it to see if you want to go on. And I second the Dresden books, too.
 

l3gacy

Dr. Awesomesauce
Staff member
#23
yagoov said:
Hi,

I would greatly appreciate if you could recommend me a book.

I want to read something that is not so predictable and has many twists in the story line (like GRRM's books). I would also prefer a long series to occupy myself in my free time. :)
Your idea about Runelords was a good one-- there's a lot of books and it's got a really unique magic system. I haven't read it (yet) but intend to someday.

So, longish series, some twists, and seems like you prefer an adult slant:

Fitz books (Farseer & Tawny Man); 6 book series by Robin Hobb
The First Law; 3 books by Joe Abercrombie... not a long series but good adult fantasy
Kushiel books (there are 6 total), by Jacqueline Carey
Black Company by Glen Cook; there are 10 books (they will probably be hard to find; they are publishing Omnibus versions of 3 at a time I think that you should be able to find).
There are a lot more books in the Riftwar universe; some are good, some not so much.
Drenai Saga (starting with Legend) is a classic, big series by David Gemmell (there are 11 books); haven't read this series so I don't know about twists, but it's got a great reputation
Dark Tower by Stephen King (7 books)
Xanth by Piers Anthony (there are like 400 books, and this isn't a serious suggestion, these books suck)
Recluse saga by LE Modesitt (15 books); another I haven't read but have heard decent things about
Depending on your tastes, Discworld by Terry Pratchett is massive (I think the most recent book was #36) but this series is normally very silly and you may not be interested in this... the books you listed are significantly more heavy in tone than Discworld

Hope some of these are what you were looking for...
 

HazyJay

Is a wondrous friend of modest Kruppe
#24
yagoov said:
Hi,

I would greatly appreciate if you could recommend me a book.

So let's see, my favorite fantasy novels:
Jordan: WoT, GRRM's Song of Ice and Fire (I read 2 books from the Narnia Chronicles, The Magician's Nephew and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and liked them very much, but the other books werent as good) and I'm currently reading the Riftwar saga's second book (I liked the first one, but sadly the second one shifted the PoV from Pug :( and is becoming more and more boring)

I want to read something that is not so predictable and has many twists in the story line (like GRRM's books). I would also prefer a long series to occupy myself in my free time. :)

I tried Erikson's Malazan series (read the first book and about 100 pages of the second one), but I was greatly disappointed. It was like a history book for me, without any interesting character (or just too many).


I was thinking to try perhaps the Memory, Sorrow & Thorn or The Runelords saga; however they don't seem to offer anything new.

I would welcome any recommendation and suggestion.
Try Greg Keyes Kingdom of Thorn and Bone. Kind of a GRRM lite, if you will. Not as complex, not as gray, not near as long, but a good read and has some good twists.

Memory, Sorrow, & Thorn is good as well if you can plug through it. I remember some slow spots, but overall, it is an outstanding series and has some unexpected twists in it. Not nearly as complex or gray as GRRM, but a good tale, none the less.
 

Jon Snow

No Power in the Verse can stop me
Staff member
#25
l3gacy said:
Fitz books (Farseer & Tawny Man); 6 book series by Robin Hobb
Excellent books, I liked both series but liked Tawny man even more.

l3gacy said:
The First Law; 3 books by Joe Abercrombie... not a long series but good adult fantasy
Excellent series, Before they are Hanged (book 2) is one of my favourite books of all time
l3gacy said:
Drenai Saga (starting with Legend) is a classic, big series by David Gemmell (there are 11 books); haven't read this series so I don't know about twists, but it's got a great reputation
Yes this series is great. If you only want to follow Druss (the main character from Legend) then you need to read Druss, The First Chronicles of Druss the Legend, The Legend of Death Walker.

The other books are also great but they don't follow Druss.
l3gacy said:
Depending on your tastes, Discworld by Terry Pratchett is massive (I think the most recent book was #36) but this series is normally very silly and you may not be interested in this... the books you listed are significantly more heavy in tone than Discworld
Yes very light in both content and page numbers but still worth it I think if it you need something lighter inbetween big books/series
 
#26
Orson Scott Card?

Why didn't Orson Scott Card make any of the lists? I just wondered. Or Neil Gaiman. Unless you don't consider them Fantasy Book authors? I'm a little confused about the genre, actually.

About Twilight: It's more of a romance than a fantasy novel. And Bella became a Mary Sue at the end. :(

Tigana reminded me of Card's Songmaster for some reason.
 

Jon Snow

No Power in the Verse can stop me
Staff member
#28
Yeah Card is sci-fi. I have been meaning to read it as Ender's Game has some really good raps. I'm Sure Ben has it in the top 10 list for sci-fi
 
#30
I'd really appreciate any new recommendations you guys can give me. Mostly I'm looking for new authors, since I already know to look at authors I've liked in the past, but I'll still take recommendations regarding authors I've read if you think I'm missing out on something I'll like.

Here's what I've read and liked (and I'll point out some I haven't liked too I guess):

J. R. R. Tolkien
Good: The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings (These are my favorite books ever. I've read them both -- or all 4 depending on how you count -- over 15 times each.)
Bad: I tried reading The Silmarillion and I couldn't stand it.
C. S. Lewis
Good: The Space Trilogy, The Chronicles of Narnia
Raymond E. Feist
Good: The Riftwar Saga, Krondor's Sons, The Riftwar Legacy
David Eddings
Good: The Belgariad, The Malloreon, Belgarath the Sorcerer, Polgara the Sorceress, The Elenium, The Tamuli, The Redemption of Althalus
Notes: Eddings seems to have a limited number of personality molds from which to create his characters. Even though The Belgariad, The Elenium, and The Redemption of Althalus all take place in different universes with different people, I can still identify characters with the exact same personalities and behaviors across all three. So I have to take some time between reading his stuff, or I start getting sick of the repetitiveness. But each book taken on its own is solid. It's really just when starting one series right after having finished another that it's a tad bothersome.
Jim Butcher
Good: The Dresden Files
Bad?: I tried starting his Codex Alera series with Furies of Calderon, but after about 5 chapters I stopped cause I was frustrated with how many people and concepts were being introduced without explanation. The first kind of crafting mentioned is woodcrafting, and I'm thinking of a guy carving wood with a knife... It didn't make any sense. Stuff like that where you don't have a clue what's going on, and he takes it for granted that you somehow are already familiar with how the Codex Alera universe works. I hear people saying it's really good though, and I usually give books a bit longer to pull me in. Should I give it another shot? I just really don't like not having things fully explained for so long.
Frank Herbert
Good: Dune
Bad: I tried reading the sequel to Dune, but it just didn't pull me in. I found myself totally disinterested.
Orson Scott Card
Good: Ender's Game
Bad: I tried reading the sequel to Ender's Game, but it just didn't pull me in. I found myself totally disinterested.
Christopher Paolini
Decent: Inheritance Cycle
Notes: It started out pretty good I thought, but the cycle seems to be getting weaker as it goes on. I imagine the fouth book will probably be alright though. For the record, I agree with a lot of the criticism ppl heap on Eragon, but that doesn't mean I don't like it. It's like the diff between an oscar winning movie full of grand and moving performances, and a forgettable summer action flick. Sure the action flick might be crappy comparatively, but that doesn't mean the ride isn't fun while it lasts.
J. K. Rowling
Ok-ish: Harry Potter series
Notes: Series started off pretty good I thought, but only got weaker and weaker as it went on. By the end I didn't really think it was very good, but I wanted to finish it just to find out what happened, rather than cause I enjoyed the journey to get there. But I still count it ok-ish as a whole.


EDIT: How could I forget!?
Terry Goodkind
Good: The Sword of Truth (thought the political stuff in the later books can get a tad annoying)
 

daystar

Knows how to pronounce Kvothe
#32
i would agree with all of your evaluatons of the books you listed(read them all).margaret weis is a good author with alot of books to read(dragonlance, etc). if you liked david eddings then you should like terry brooks as well .if you want more of the dresden file type(in story not writing style) maybe kim harrison(first book is dead witch walking).young adult the lost years of merlin series is good to.if you want heaver fare go to the top 25 list.
 
#33
Thanks all for the recommendations.

I'm about to finish the Riftwar trilogy, and I am a little bit disappointed. :( The first book (Magician) was good, but the others are pretty derivative (and I'm beginning to get fed up with the plethora of good characters - every character is good and naive :I ; furthermore I couldn't get myself to like any other character besides Pug, they just seem to general; frankly I would have been OK with the PoV changes, shifts, if the characters had been more interesting - I read the whole 11 books of WoT :) and I liked those even though the PoV changed often). I understand that many compare this series to WoT, but I find Jordan's world much more detailed (more realistic) - it seemed that Feist only described one or two cities - and enjoyed it much more. So I decided the next books or series should be longer, more detailed and realistic with some gray characters.

I read another book as well during this time Gaiman's Neverwhere that I liked a lot. I simply couldn't put it down and read it in 3 days. It wasn't anything new from a fantasy's point of view, but it was just interesting concept and plot line.

As I wrote previously I think I'll try "The Name of the Wind", but probably I'll wait for the second book to come out first.

I read good things about Hobb's Farseer trilogy, but I'm concerned that the story will be full with the same old fantasy cliches and would be very predictable.

I would ask you all about the Chronicles of Thomas Covenant as I read very extreme reviews (some people love it very much and some hate it very much); however the story seems very interesting and original.
 
#34
If you're worried about derivative don't read Brooks. Shannara is the epitome of cliche. Farseer is one of my favorite sets. I thought it was one of the better trilogies there is. The story line is definitely not predictable. Personally I couldn't stand Thomas Covenant.
 

Jon Snow

No Power in the Verse can stop me
Staff member
#35
yagoov: Read Farseer, it is not cliche at all and I really enjoyed the magic system.

Robin Hobb is the best at what she does. And that is writing in the 1st Person.
 

daystar

Knows how to pronounce Kvothe
#37
thomas covenant was a good series.unpredictable and like brooks first three books,donaldsons first three are seperate stories entirely.the first brooks book copied lotr mostly but the rest with wish song is unique. sword was made in 77, not much out other than lotr so you cant hold that much against him for tring to be like the best fantasy at the time(there were many,many people that copied lotr who's books were almost unreadable).if you can like thrones then nothing will be wrong with covenant, since there are worse things happining in game of thrones .
am91962 said:
If you're worried about derivative don't read Brooks. Shannara is the epitome of cliche. Farseer is one of my favorite sets. I thought it was one of the better trilogies there is. The story line is definitely not predictable. Personally I couldn't stand Thomas Covenant.
eddings is derivative as well. could probly make a case over 90 percent of fantasy is just a collection of borrowed ideas. thats no reason not to read a good story.
 

Jon Snow

No Power in the Verse can stop me
Staff member
#38
people who don't like Thomas Covenant is usually down to being hate how he self loathes all the freakin time