It’s April 2018: What Fantasy book are you reading?

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#41
Completed book 5 of the Shadow Campaigns. It got going right after I complained.

I’m making an observation here and not a judgment. So I don’t want to get angry cards and letters from anyone.

Django Wexler had an extremely heavy pro LGBT agenda he was pushing. There were three main POV characters and the one (who was kinda “the star of the show”) was a lesbian transvestite. There were several other lesbians. At least 4 gay males, and a tribe of bisexuals. Heterosexual at home and homosexual when on military campaigns which they only embarked on with members of their own sex. (Sort of what prisoners glibly refer to as “gay for the stay”). No transgenders but that wasn’t an option at that time. I never really thought about it in previous books but in the 5th book it was EXTREMELY heavy. He even danced around gay marriage. He took us into their bedrooms (quite descriptive but nothing graphic) and to their dances. He told us about newbies trying it out and really bent over backwards telling us how normal it is. Actually, Unlike real life, Not ONE single person batted an eyelash. Nobody cared in the military? No ribbing or rolled eyes? I don’t like ANY kind of agendas (religious, political, etc.) in fantasy books. For the record I’m fine with gay marriage (don’t see any reason they shouldn’t get tax breaks, etc.) and I don’t care what consenting adults do in the privacy of their bedrooms.

That aside there just wasn’t anything new here. But IMO, it was a good series anyhow.
 

ExTended

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#42
Completed book 5 of the Shadow Campaigns. It got going right after I complained.

I’m making an observation here and not a judgment. So I don’t want to get angry cards and letters from anyone.

Django Wexler had an extremely heavy pro LGBT agenda he was pushing. There were three main POV characters and the one (who was kinda “the star of the show”) was a lesbian transvestite. There were several other lesbians. At least 4 gay males, and a tribe of bisexuals. Heterosexual at home and homosexual when on military campaigns which they only embarked on with members of their own sex. (Sort of what prisoners glibly refer to as “gay for the stay”). No transgenders but that wasn’t an option at that time. I never really thought about it in previous books but in the 5th book it was EXTREMELY heavy. He even danced around gay marriage. He took us into their bedrooms (quite descriptive but nothing graphic) and to their dances. He told us about newbies trying it out and really bent over backwards telling us how normal it is. Actually, Unlike real life, Not ONE single person batted an eyelash. Nobody cared in the military? No ribbing or rolled eyes? I don’t like ANY kind of agendas (religious, political, etc.) in fantasy books. For the record I’m fine with gay marriage (don’t see any reason they shouldn’t get tax breaks, etc.) and I don’t care what consenting adults do in the privacy of their bedrooms.

That aside there just wasn’t anything new here. But IMO, it was a good series anyhow.
You might have just killed this series for me... I absolutely hate it when authors bend backwards to preach a point, even if I happen to agree with it.

The inserted angst and sexual problems tension in Lightbringer 4 are still vivid in my mind - you want to make a point, then do it, but making 1/2 of your book revolving about a completely irrelevant plot-point for the sake of some extra fake tension/social awareness points, it's quite sad way of ruining your over-all work.

One time I've seen the "being gay is cool" part done almost right was in Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo, but it was still unsettling, because I am either too dense, or the two guys were BFFs in the previous book, so... there's that. But at least it was somewhat plot-related.

On another note - I am going strong with The Dagger and the Coin series. I am already on book four of my re-read of it. How can I describe it... It's like participating in a satisfying conversation. None of the participants is in a needless hurry, yet there's this subtle feel of progression, and unfolding and understanding, and of course - enjoyment of it all. As far as slow burners of a book go, in my humble opinion those five are some of the best.

I am almost tempted to go into The Expanse at some point, although I am almost as far from being a SF reader as one could possibly get.
 

Ryan W. Mueller

Journeyed there and back again
#43
I am almost tempted to go into The Expanse at some point, although I am almost as far from being a SF reader as one could possibly get.
You should give it a shot. It's very accessible science fiction that doesn't get bogged down in technical details.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#44
You might have just killed this series for me... I absolutely hate it when authors bend backwards to preach a point, even if I happen to agree with it.

The inserted angst and sexual problems tension in Lightbringer 4 are still vivid in my mind - you want to make a point, then do it, but making 1/2 of your book revolving about a completely irrelevant plot-point for the sake of some extra fake tension/social awareness points, it's quite sad way of ruining your over-all work.

One time I've seen the "being gay is cool" part done almost right was in Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo, but it was still unsettling, because I am either too dense, or the two guys were BFFs in the previous book, so... there's that. But at least it was somewhat plot-related.

On another note - I am going strong with The Dagger and the Coin series. I am already on book four of my re-read of it. How can I describe it... It's like participating in a satisfying conversation. None of the participants is in a needless hurry, yet there's this subtle feel of progression, and unfolding and understanding, and of course - enjoyment of it all. As far as slow burners of a book go, in my humble opinion those five are some of the best.

I am almost tempted to go into The Expanse at some point, although I am almost as far from being a SF reader as one could possibly get.

In the major case, the gay/ transvestite thing is highly relevant to the plot but all the rest is just a soap box for his “cause”. It’s still a good series, IMO, but nothing special so I don’t think you’ll regret passing it by if you so choose. There are better out there. The magic system is cool, but I haven’t read enough fantasy to say it is unique. Only that It was new to me.

Like you, I ebjoyed Dagger and Coin, thiught it was unique, and that it got better with each book. I will never ever forget Geder!
 

ExTended

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#45
In the major case, the gay/ transvestite thing is highly relevant to the plot but all the rest is just a soap box for his “cause”. It’s still a good series, IMO, but nothing special so I don’t think you’ll regret passing it by if you so choose. There are better out there. The magic system is cool, but I haven’t read enough fantasy to say it is unique. Only that It was new to me.
I'd probably have to go through it one day, despite its actual quality, themes and such, mainly because I am writing a gunpowder fantasy series and I should check if I am unintentionally borrowing from the more well-known works in the sub-genre. But I'd do it with your comment in mind, because while I enjoy my fiction to be more meaty at times, I am also reading to get away from politics and the real world problems of the day. But you cannot always have it your way I guess.

But considering how I've gone through four books of love triangles with Sara J Maas, a book preaching gay right should be a walk in the park. :D Nothing is worse than love triangles.

You should give it a shot. It's very accessible science fiction that doesn't get bogged down in technical details.
Thanks! I went on to give a chance to Red Rising trilogy and I am very pleased to have done it - a very approachable SF series for a strictly fantasy guy like me. I guess it would be even easier with The Expanse, since I already trust one of its creators quite much.
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#46
Finished Lightbringer #4. Five stars may be a touch high but I love this series. I had read this was a weaker book but it was just as good as the third and I read it in under a week. Some cool reveals and I love Kips story line. Some may have been upset that Gavin is on the back burner but Kip is my favourite. His actions and love life have been great. Author Brent Weeks has me hooked. Can’t wait for book 5.

4.5/5

Extended. I read you didn’t like the sexual tension in this book but I liked it. The relationship between Kip and Tisis needed to be harder and that was a way to make it interesting. At first I figured Tisis would have to die so Kip could find his way back to Teia but I grew to love her character and the way the book ended.
 

Cyphon

Journeyed there and back again
#48
Finished Lightbringer #4. Five stars may be a touch high but I love this series. I had read this was a weaker book but it was just as good as the third and I read it in under a week. Some cool reveals and I love Kips story line. Some may have been upset that Gavin is on the back burner but Kip is my favourite. His actions and love life have been great. Author Brent Weeks has me hooked. Can’t wait for book 5.

4.5/5

Extended. I read you didn’t like the sexual tension in this book but I liked it. The relationship between Kip and Tisis needed to be harder and that was a way to make it interesting. At first I figured Tisis would have to die so Kip could find his way back to Teia but I grew to love her character and the way the book ended.
Have you read The Night Angel trilogy? It is also a very fun read from Weeks.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#49
Just finished Children of Hurin~ Christopher Tolkien

The cover says its written by JRR Tolkien only edited by Chris, but I will not dishonor Tolkiens name by acknowledging that. They have their own unique writing styles, and maybe this was set up from a rough outline, but it is clearly mostly Chris writing it. If Chris wanted to honor his father and not make money off him he would send this to a literary historian to have that person write the novel, someone with the skills to write it in the spirit and style of his father. Skills he obviously lacks

There are moments with whole paragraphs that are clearly JRR so I am not trying to say it is completely a fabrication, but this was a seriously disappointing book.

The biggest problem is tense. Often, certain narrative paragraphs switch tenses back and forth for no discernable reason. This was definitely not a matter of switching from a past tense narrative and present tense quotations, it was all narrative. paraphrased example : Turin had charged the Orcs and swung his sword away having had met a defensive blow. Now he was charging in again into the fray so he can cut through. But the Orcs had won the day and had pushed Turin back into the forests.

I have no hope for the new book being good. Chris is not a talented writer, and everytime he publishes something with his fathers name it has more and more filler written by Chris.

am I being more cynical than he deserves, possibly. But I did not like reading this book, broken into a movie (there is a great fan made one out there) it is great, but almost unreadable in this format.

next up I read my yearly contractual obligation read I have with my wife. last year I had the Dragon riders of pern trilogy, and I ended up reading it this January, so this year I have to make sure I get it done on time.

This year, I have to read Patricia Briggs, starting Moon Called now.
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#50
Have you read The Night Angel trilogy? It is also a very fun read from Weeks.
I haven’t read that series. I have read that people seem to like one or the other although it seems some feel Lightbringer is the more polished product since Weeks is more experienced.

I’m thinking of Kings of the Wyld or Six of Crows next. Many here seem to love the Wyld.
 

Cyphon

Journeyed there and back again
#51
I haven’t read that series. I have read that people seem to like one or the other although it seems some feel Lightbringer is the more polished product since Weeks is more experienced.

I’m thinking of Kings of the Wyld or Six of Crows next. Many here seem to love the Wyld.
Personally a big fan of both Weeks series and I think Night Angel is right up there with Lightbringer, particularly in terms of pure entertaintment. It offers more than just entertainment but regardless it is a very fun read.
 

ExTended

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#52
I haven’t read that series. I have read that people seem to like one or the other although it seems some feel Lightbringer is the more polished product since Weeks is more experienced.

I’m thinking of Kings of the Wyld or Six of Crows next. Many here seem to love the Wyld.
All of those are great choices tbh. Night Angel trilogy is very different compared to Ligghtbringer. I've liked them both, but while I am more appreciative towards Lightbringer's complexity, intricacy and diversity in terms of interesting characters, Night Angel is probably the more to the point series of the two. It aims at being entertaining, it is entertaining. And the characters are for the most part just as interesting as those in the Lightbringer. For me, though, The Night Angel trilogy has the better protagonist of the two - one that is awesome enough to carry the story on his own for the most part.

Kings of the Wyld is unapologetic fun start to finish.

Six of Crows has one of the coolest rogue-consciousness characters there are in this genre. Think Locke Lamora with a slightly higher success rate in screwing up others and fewer moral restrictions from his already dubious care for the fellow man. Reading about Kaz Brekker's exploits is the definition of pure pleasure, especially in the second book.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#53
Yesterday I finished Midnight Tides. This one was a lot better than I remembered and it serves as a nice change in scenery from the rest of the Malazan main series by Erikson. The book basically tells the story of two clashing civilizations (Lether and Tiste Edur) which both has their own distinctive view on the world. The story is also a story about two families, the Beddicts and the Sengars. Interweaved in it all is the struggle of the Crippled God to gain a foothold in this world. He finds a somewhat willing conduit in the form of one of the Sengar brothers. At the end there is the typical Malazan convergence; lots of blood is spilled, people die, are revived, and die again, some questions are answered, some are left unanswered, some plot-lines are started (it was for example very nice to see the parts about the Crimson Guard contingent led by Iron Bars. It was a nice addition to the Esslemont books about the Crimson Guard) and overall there is a lot of pathos that can make even the stonehearted weep.

The brilliant thing about this book is that it is pretty much a standalone novel. There are some recurring characters and themes from the main story-line, but I think this can be perfectly enjoyed on its own as well.

After finishing Midnight Tides I immediately started on the Bonehunters, a book that brings us back to Seven Cities in the aftermath of the Whirlwind rebellion. It's a massive tome, totaling more than 1300 pages, and thereby the largest Malazan book up until this point in the series. I think this'll keep me busy for at least two months.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#55
Just now finished Night Without Stars by Peter Hamilton, the second book of the Faller war duology.

Starting the third book in the Song of Shattered Sands series, The Veil of Spears, by Bradley Beaulieu.
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#56
I recently read that the Night Angel trilogy by Weeks has a lot of similarities to the Wheel of Time. Maybe I make that my next series. I've been trying to go through my list of books that I got on sale for $2-$3. Of course if you like the first book you get sucked into the whole series which is the whole point of those sales.
 

hamnida

Hung out on a briar with Honorable Jorg
#57
I just finished reading Quillifer by Walter Jon Williams and absolutely loved the book.

The narrative is the adventures of a rogue - the humorous kind, not the backstabbing criminal - told in first person. The protagonist is intelligent and mostly good natured but relentlessly opportunistic and has the occasional mean streak.

The story is set in the early modern period for a change. We have not only gunpowder but also a burgeoning capitalism, where the protagonist is a keen participant, and a form of religious enlightenment. These elements are all seamlessly integrated and so detailed it could almost be a historic novel.

Another delightful element is the prose, which is more elaborate than most fantasy novels (still a step below Rothfuss). Especially the dialogue is always polished and often quite funny.

The only slightly problematic element is the plot, which is episodic in nature and by the protagonists own admission more driven by circumstance than a central agenda - other than social advancement. Despite that, it is always entertaining.
As this is the first volume in a series it serves as an introduction to the world while the main character is still coming into his own.
 

Ryan W. Mueller

Journeyed there and back again
#58
I recently read that the Night Angel trilogy by Weeks has a lot of similarities to the Wheel of Time. Maybe I make that my next series. I've been trying to go through my list of books that I got on sale for $2-$3. Of course if you like the first book you get sucked into the whole series which is the whole point of those sales.
Not really that similar to The Wheel of Time in my opinion. Still a great book, but definitely grittier and more action-heavy than the Wheel of Time. The story becomes epic as it goes along, but it's not as epic as The Wheel of Time.

The Night Angel trilogy is one of my favorites. If anything, I'd say it feels like a grittier version of Sanderson.

His Lightbringer series is also great, though it looks like the last book has been pushed back to 2019. Again, it's like a Sanderson story, but gritter and with more main characters of questionable morality.
 

Jakyro

Journeyed there and back again
#59
After finishing Midnight Tides I immediately started on the Bonehunters, a book that brings us back to Seven Cities in the aftermath of the Whirlwind rebellion. It's a massive tome, totaling more than 1300 pages, and thereby the largest Malazan book up until this point in the series. I think this'll keep me busy for at least two months.
One of my favourites in the series ... that ending !!!! :eek: :cool:
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#60
One of my favourites in the series ... that ending !!!! :eek: :cool:
It's one of my favorites too. I think this may have the best pacing of all Malazan books by Erikson. Although it is a huge tome, the relatively fast switches in PoW make it seem very cinematic, almost like you're watching a movie.