It’s April 2018: What Fantasy book are you reading?

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#61
Completed Under The Pendulant Sun by Jeannett Ng. (Eng, Ing, Inge, nayg? Etc...)

Most people reviewing this book loved it. I found it confusing.Hints, innuendos, allegories, philosophies and the like that either didn’t seem relevant or were lost in the shuffle because there were just too many to remember. I sometimes felt she was trying to imitate Lewis Carrol’s Alice in the way she used language in the nonsensical world. The weiters logic seemed skewed at times. Editing could have been better. The characters seemed flat.

However, the story itself was unique. It’s quite a gothic world of fairies. I recognized Mab from Dresden (and Romeo and Juliet). I guess a human from our world would consider the fairy world a dystopia. Most reviewers describe it as creepy. Parts were exciting but overall slowly paced. I thought it was quite creative. It heavily touches on a taboo subject. Also a Christianity agenda is oushed

Overall I thought it was Ok-pretty good but I was confused a lot and had trouble connecting the dots. I can see others here loving it. Lots of twists and turns. It was 416 pges but IMO, it was 125 or so pages too long.

I’ve seen references to Jane Eyre so I will add that to my TBR. I had no idea what it was about before.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#62
Hrm. I'm about two chapters into Under the Pendulant Sun myself and I have to say it hasn't gripped. I'll give it more chances... eventually... but you haven't exactly pushed me further to do so there.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#63
Hrm. I'm about two chapters into Under the Pendulant Sun myself and I have to say it hasn't gripped. I'll give it more chances... eventually... but you haven't exactly pushed me further to do so there.
I’m looking forward to your review. I think I look at things too literally. You may catch things I missed. But even though I’m the oddball I still stand by the weaknesses I percieved. It’s just the overall picture that maybe flew right over my head. I was glad when I completed it but it was by no means torturous. I would give it maybe 7/10. I always randomly pick a few reviewers history and they looked legitimate to me. None of the telltale signs of fakes and almost all were excellent although the sample size was small. I do hope you like it better than I did. I think perhaps it’s one of those books where if I read it again immediately afterward things might click. But I don’t really care.
 

Kalavan

Journeyed there and back again
#64
Long time no posting, but the last couple of months were particularly hectic, time for a quick recap of the last books I’ve read:

Finished Tucker’ Chronicles of the Black Gate, really an amazing epic fantasy series, although the last installment was perhaps the weakest, with a bit too much up and downs (especially the marginal role to which Iskra – the most interesting character in the first 3 books – and Kethe were relegated), still possibly the best self-published series I’ve read thus far.

I’ve then read Maresca’s Lady Henterman’s Wardrobe, another captivating and fun fantasy romp in his ever more complex and interconnected string of different series taking place in the fictional city of Maradaine, The Streets of Maradaine is my favourite amongst them, and I’m growing ever more curious to see where he is planning to take this story.

I’ve also kinda enjoyed @Davis Ashura ‘s William Wilde and the Necrosed, although it was a bit too much YA and a bit too much of an introductory novel for my tastes. But considering how much I’ve liked his first series I am going to pick up the second installment as soon as it will be available, hoping for a more mature tone now that the MC has started to realize his own reality.

I did not really like instead Skovron’s Empire of Storms trilogy. The first installment was actually an enjoyable fantasy romp, but the following entries were quite disappointing, lots of meaningless meanderings, deus ex-machina and way too many overpowered characters trivializing any challenge they encountered, in the last 2 books there were several clashes quickly resolved without any tension or real peril.

Luckily the following book I’ve read was simply amazing, de Castell’s Traitor’s Blade was the concentrate of swashbuckling entertainment I was expecting, full of witty banter, dry humour, plot twists and impossible odds, but it was also much more darker and grittier than I was anticipating, really a marvelous book.

Now halfway through the second installment of the Greatcoats, Knight’s Shadow, thus far an huge improvement to the already excellent first entry.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#65
You are bound for an epic adventure all the way through The Greatcoats series by Sebastien De Castell. It's one of the most consistently awesome series I've ever read.
 

Ser Pounce

Journeyed there and back again
#66
Really glad to see the Greatcoats series gain some traction on the boards. Completely agree with @ExTended. Book 2 & 3 were my two favorites of the series but all four books are very good.
 

Cyphon

Journeyed there and back again
#67
Just finished Traitor's Blade by Sebastien De Castell

Good timing with the last couple of posts I guess and I am just going to further the buzz. This was an awesome book. Not going to lie, for a chapter or 2 I was a bit worried I wasn't going to like it and then came a man with an axe and a flashback and I was hooked from that point on. It still amazes me sometimes that I can like a 1000 page tome and still have questions and on the flipside read something like this that is under 400 pages and feel completely satisfied with the experience. Twists and turns, awesome characters, and a lot of grit and emotion all neatly wrapped up in a tight bundle. It found the perfect balance of light and witty mixed in with some truly dark moments from the villains.

The only thing I am going to knock it for is that the action wasn't particularly inspiring.

9.5/10


I already have the next ones ordered and on the way. I am hoping they are here on Monday.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#68
just finished Moon Called~ Patricia Briggs

This is a contractual Obligation read, by orders of my wife. (she has to read Asimov) the idea being that we are challenging eachother with books not in our normal reading scope.

I never would have read this without the obligation.

between the titles, the cover art, and the general conception, I was led to believe this to be a Werewolf centered romance novel series. It is not.

There is less sex, less provocative imagery, and less awkward sexual tension than MOST of the Isaac Asimov's books. (but when it is there, it is unmistakably obvious, direct, and romance booklike)

The book revolves around a Coyote "skinwalker" (look it up, it's a Native American thing) who was raised by werewolves and operates as a Mechanic in a rural town in Western Washington. (stereotypically for books in that area, and culture, she is a selfexile.) She ends up in the middle of a Gothic Urban Fantasy Mystery, (like Dresden Files, but IMHO not quite as good, and more werewolf oriented and less Mage)

I'm reluctant to say more without ruining it, It is a good Series starter, and I will be reading the next one.

Edit : I met Patricia Briggs last year at the release signing at "murder by the book" Houston. likely will do it again as long as I am only four hours away.

7.5/10
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#69
I’m looking forward to your review. I think I look at things too literally. You may catch things I missed. But even though I’m the oddball I still stand by the weaknesses I percieved. It’s just the overall picture that maybe flew right over my head. I was glad when I completed it but it was by no means torturous. I would give it maybe 7/10. I always randomly pick a few reviewers history and they looked legitimate to me. None of the telltale signs of fakes and almost all were excellent although the sample size was small. I do hope you like it better than I did. I think perhaps it’s one of those books where if I read it again immediately afterward things might click. But I don’t really care.
Don't hold your breath too long, I'm not sure I like her prose enough to give it a full go.

Currently toying with doing a re-read of Bernard Cornwell's The Winter King, but not sure I'm feeling it. All the old books I want to re-read, I can't find on my seriously curtailed bookshelves.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#70
Don't hold your breath too long, I'm not sure I like her prose enough to give it a full go.

Currently toying with doing a re-read of Bernard Cornwell's The Winter King, but not sure I'm feeling it. All the old books I want to re-read, I can't find on my seriously curtailed bookshelves.
@Peat

Well, not wanting to finish it says it all! So I guess I wasn’t far off the mark. I’m curious. Where did you hear of it? I found it on 2 or 3 lists of The Best Fantasy Books Of 2017. I think you and I would disagree but the reviews all looked authentic so I dunno.

I’ve read 3 Bernard Cornwell books from The Saxon Tales over the last year or two. The Last Kingdom (1), The Empty Throne (8), and The Flame Bearer (10). The numbers are all over the place as I bought them when they were on sale. I thought they all were fun, well written, interesting, and I learned a lot from them. I stopped because they seemed more or less like airplane books (YA?) and knew I would soon tire of them. But enjoyed them all. and actually got a pretty good grip on the entire series reading those three books.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#71
@Peat

Well, not wanting to finish it says it all! So I guess I wasn’t far off the mark. I’m curious. Where did you hear of it? I found it on 2 or 3 lists of The Best Fantasy Books Of 2017. I think you and I would disagree but the reviews all looked authentic so I dunno.

I’ve read 3 Bernard Cornwell books from The Saxon Tales over the last year or two. The Last Kingdom (1), The Empty Throne (8), and The Flame Bearer (10). The numbers are all over the place as I bought them when they were on sale. I thought they all were fun, well written, interesting, and I learned a lot from them. I stopped because they seemed more or less like airplane books (YA?) and knew I would soon tire of them. But enjoyed them all. and actually got a pretty good grip on the entire series reading those three books.
I heard about it passing a few times, but I brought it when I saw it on sale for a quid on Amazon. In for a pound and all that. I'm not ruling reading it out... just not in either. But seriously, I'm only ... 15 pages in? The only thing it really proves is that I'm picky as ****.


Yeah, you could call Cornwall an airport thriller author - just all his thrillers are historical. Or semi-historical. I've yet to tire of them but can see how others would.
 

Kalavan

Journeyed there and back again
#72
I’ve read 3 Bernard Cornwell books from The Saxon Tales over the last year or two. The Last Kingdom (1), The Empty Throne (8), and The Flame Bearer (10). The numbers are all over the place as I bought them when they were on sale. I thought they all were fun, well written, interesting, and I learned a lot from them. I stopped because they seemed more or less like airplane books (YA?) and knew I would soon tire of them. But enjoyed them all. and actually got a pretty good grip on the entire series reading those three books.
I could also understand getting tired with his longer series – although I’ve read at least a dozen of the Sharpe novels before getting burned-out with'em – but the Warlords Chronicles is a brilliant trilogy, my favorite modern take on the Arthurian legend, and Derfel Cadarn is one of my all-time favorite MC.

And only Kearney and perhaps Cameron can write better battle scenes.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#73
I heard about it passing a few times, but I brought it when I saw it on sale for a quid on Amazon. In for a pound and all that. I'm not ruling reading it out... just not in either. But seriously, I'm only ... 15 pages in? The only thing it really proves is that I'm picky as ****.


Yeah, you could call Cornwall an airport thriller author - just all his thrillers are historical. Or semi-historical. I've yet to tire of them but can see how others would.
I figured a “quid” meant cheap and looking it up didn’t really help. But I got it for $1.99 down from $6.99 so I figured why not?

I meant it when I said that I learned a lot (about England’s interesting history from those books. It never occurred to me to even look). But I was totally ignorant.There may be nothing educational to folks from G.B. or more up on European history. I’m embarrassed to admit I think many Americans just figure England was always kind of just there and tea parties and 1776 and all that jazz. :hilarious:
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#74
I could also understand getting tired with his longer series – although I’ve read at least a dozen of the Sharpe novels before getting burned-out with'em – but the Warlords Chronicles is a brilliant trilogy, my favorite modern take on the Arthurian legend, and Derfel Cadarn is one of my all-time favorite MC.

And only Kearney and perhaps Cameron can write better battle scenes.
If I gave the impression I was knocking him, it was unintentional. I just meant I really enjoyed each book separately, but that was enough for me. Perhaps had I read them in the proper order I would feel differently?
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#75
I figured a “quid” meant cheap and looking it up didn’t really help. But I got it for $1.99 down from $6.99 so I figured why not?

I meant it when I said that I learned a lot (about England’s interesting history from those books. It never occurred to me to even look). But I was totally ignorant.There may be nothing educational to folks from G.B. or more up on European history. I’m embarrassed to admit I think many Americans just figure England was always kind of just there and tea parties and 1776 and all that jazz. :hilarious:
a quid is1 pound. comes out to around $1.40 right now, but it goes up and down between $.50 and $2 regularly.
 

Kalavan

Journeyed there and back again
#76
If I gave the impression I was knocking him, it was unintentional. I just meant I really enjoyed each book separately, but that was enough for me. Perhaps had I read them in the proper order I would feel differently?
No, I know what you meant, it's somewhat similar to my opinion on Gemmell: I've really enjoyed most of his books, but it took me nearly 10 years to read them all, after a while I tend to grow weary of them.

With Gemmell I then need another fix - and actually I've started a complete re-read a couple of years ago, that should take me another decade.
Should you ever feel a similar urge with Cornwell, give The Warlord Chronicles a try, you will thank me then
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#77
Night Angel was a solid book. I enjoyed it but not worth 5 stars imo. There is no real epic plot. More of a coming of age story as 10 years almost passes across the book with smaller plots for the most part. I liked the characters although it’s hard to love dark heroes for me.

4/5

Have to say I didn’t get the WOT comparison at all. A couple things but the world, the writing and plot are so different. Not sure why some people would argue over that.

I enjoyed Lightbringer first book more than this one bit definitely continuing .
 

Kalavan

Journeyed there and back again
#78
Took a couple of days off in order to take a breath after a particularly stressful couple of months at work, and I’ve managed to complete de Castell’s Knight’s Shadow and Saint’s Blood, both a complete roller-coaster of emotions: for most of the time entertaining and extremely funny thanks to the witty banter and the hilarious remarks of our narrator, but at times touching, infuriating and a couple of times even disturbing due to all the sufferings and challenges our heroes have to face.

And while the first book – albeit brilliant – was mostly focused on the bad-ass MC, now de Castell masterfully manages an ever increasing cast of ever more complex characters, and an ever more detailed world-building, successfully upping the stakes and the level of the story.

Now onto the final installment, Tyrant’s Throne
 

Travis

Might as well be a Malazan regular
#79
Currently about 3/4 through Golden Son, and I'm really liking it! I think if I had to compare the two so far I would say that I liked Red Rising a little bit more. The books are very different indeed. My one gripe with the series so far is
that a lot of the drama boils down to just a series of betrayals over and over again.

But I'm still enjoying it nonetheless - though I do hope the drama becomes a bit more inspired going forward.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#80
I figured a “quid” meant cheap and looking it up didn’t really help. But I got it for $1.99 down from $6.99 so I figured why not?

I meant it when I said that I learned a lot (about England’s interesting history from those books. It never occurred to me to even look). But I was totally ignorant.There may be nothing educational to folks from G.B. or more up on European history. I’m embarrassed to admit I think many Americans just figure England was always kind of just there and tea parties and 1776 and all that jazz. :hilarious:
Don't be embarrassed about that. Be embarrassed that Americans have asked whether people drive cars, keep dogs as pets, or are black in England :p

I'm something of a history geek but I always picked up something new from his books - I just wish there was more good English language historical fiction about other places, so I could get an introduction to that too!


Anyway.

I'm currently re-reading The King's Buccaneer by Raymond E Feist. Still a lot of fun, but without being excellent - his characters and prose just aren't as good as others.