It’s July 2018: What fantasy book are you reading?

Matticus Primal

Journeyed there and back again
#41
Clearly a YMMV, as I've laughed/smiled more at books than I have at films/TV.

One problem I do have with a lot of "Comedic X" is the comedy needs to be cut and the X needs to really work in its own right. Too many comedies forget this.
What? You mean you expect them to tell a good story as well? How very presumptuous of you.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#42
Anyone reading any of the new books that came out? I'm busy with Hyperion, and I'm enjoying the heck out of it, but a couple of 2018 books tickle my fancy. Peter Newman has a new book out (The Deathless), Naomi Novik's Spinning Silver is out as well. Ravenycry by Ed McDonald came out (at least here in Europe).
Did anyone ready any of these?
 

Blastoise

Got in a fistfight with Dresden
#45
Finished Gardens of the Moon yesterday. Pretty good. I ended up having a good grasp on all the characters and their associations, but if I had to do it over again, I probably would have made a list/tree of characters as they came along with who/what they were/did and relative associations, lol. I had no idea/expectations as to what to expect with this series because I literally knew nothing about it aside from seeing it mentioned a lot as a 'Must-Read Fantasy Series'.

Glad I read it, though. Just started book 2 a little today.
 

Matticus Primal

Journeyed there and back again
#47
Very Presumptuous is my middle name.

Hang on - you're a huge Gaiman fan, right? Some of his stuff is definitely borderline humourous, with Good Omens being straight up comedic...
Yeaaaah... I am a Gaiman fan, but mostly in graphic novel form. I think that medium suits him better than his prose, which just doesn't connect with me. I did read Good Omens and remember not disliking it. There was a bit about all boys falling in love with War that stuck out, but otherwise I can't remember anything from it. Which isn't a good sign IMO. I do look forward to the show though. Again, I think Gaiman does well in other mediums.

Plus, I love that actor who was Wesley Snipes on 30 Rock.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#48
Yeaaaah... I am a Gaiman fan, but mostly in graphic novel form. I think that medium suits him better than his prose, which just doesn't connect with me. I did read Good Omens and remember not disliking it. There was a bit about all boys falling in love with War that stuck out, but otherwise I can't remember anything from it. Which isn't a good sign IMO. I do look forward to the show though. Again, I think Gaiman does well in other mediums.

Plus, I love that actor who was Wesley Snipes on 30 Rock.
I’ve read six Gaiman books. Most because they went on sale a lot and look pretty good. I’m all over the map with him.

I read Good Omens around eight months ago. I thought it was a nice feel good story but nothing special. I remember almost nothing about the plot either. But I didn’t think it was all that funny. At least the humor wasn’t the cheap Hitchhikers hold up a cue card and laugh on my signal type. Maybe emitted a chuckle or two.

The other day I couldn’t put my finger on what cracks me up. So I thought about the books I found really funny and finally came up with the common thread. The stuff that makes me laugh is in the way the funny thing is stated or thought by the character. It’s situational, but must be totally in line with the characters personality and speech and thinking patterns. So if I just read the joke without knowing anything about the deliverer I probably wouldn’t laugh. Like with Mat Cauthin in WOT. He cracked me up especially as the series progressed when I got to “know” him better.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#50
As I read it I was sure that the funny in Good Omens was from Pratchett. The Anasi Boys had a little humor but that's about it from Gaiman
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#51
Yeaaaah... I am a Gaiman fan, but mostly in graphic novel form. I think that medium suits him better than his prose, which just doesn't connect with me. I did read Good Omens and remember not disliking it. There was a bit about all boys falling in love with War that stuck out, but otherwise I can't remember anything from it. Which isn't a good sign IMO. I do look forward to the show though. Again, I think Gaiman does well in other mediums.

Plus, I love that actor who was Wesley Snipes on 30 Rock.
Ahh.

Each to their own - I enjoy his prose, particularly the wry element to it (which imo is easily found in Sandman).

Idle question - but what do you think novels do better than other forms of storytelling?

I’ve read six Gaiman books. Most because they went on sale a lot and look pretty good. I’m all over the map with him.

I read Good Omens around eight months ago. I thought it was a nice feel good story but nothing special. I remember almost nothing about the plot either. But I didn’t think it was all that funny. At least the humor wasn’t the cheap Hitchhikers hold up a cue card and laugh on my signal type. Maybe emitted a chuckle or two.

The other day I couldn’t put my finger on what cracks me up. So I thought about the books I found really funny and finally came up with the common thread. The stuff that makes me laugh is in the way the funny thing is stated or thought by the character. It’s situational, but must be totally in line with the characters personality and speech and thinking patterns. So if I just read the joke without knowing anything about the deliverer I probably wouldn’t laugh. Like with Mat Cauthin in WOT. He cracked me up especially as the series progressed when I got to “know” him better.
I agree strongly about a known character providing the best laughs.

I re-read Good Omens a while back. Enjoyed it, but no deep emotional pull from the characters or enthrallment with the story. Although Crowley's increasingly desperate wriggling I think comes close, and maybe the book would have been better for focusing more on him. I think a lot of comedic fantasy books can lose that.
 

Matticus Primal

Journeyed there and back again
#52
Idle question - but what do you think novels do better than other forms of storytelling?
In screenwriting we're taught that movies are a visual medium, thus we need to focus on actions when writing. Plays are a static location, and as such need to focus on verbal elements for the actors to speak. Novels are thought based, and as such do best with characters and their thoughts.

Novels, to me, are best when it comes to character studies and literally getting into their heads. Also the worldbuilding to a certain extent; although it's probably visually more interesting to see it in movie/ play, you can't really dig into the how/ why of the world without coming off as exposition. So the novel wins in this regard as well.

The novel can also play with context in a way movies/ plays can't. If my memory serves, the first chapter of Water for Elephants just refers to the rampaging elephant by her name rather than stating she's an elephant, so you're left wondering for a while how this human woman can cause so much damage. So it's better for reveals and the like.
 

fbones24

Journeyed there and back again
#53
Finished Borne by Jeff Vandermeer and was enthralled by it. The world was dark, gritty, weird and too real. This was my first time reading Vandermeer but it will not be my last.

I'm on to reading "The Poppy War" by RF Kuang. There were too many stellar reviews to pass this one up. A few chapters in the story is great and the characters are jumping out of the pages at me but I am not enamored with the prose. Coming from Borne, perhaps I was expecting too much in that department but so far, this one is a page turner with character.
 

Matticus Primal

Journeyed there and back again
#54
I'm on to reading "The Poppy War" by RF Kuang. There were too many stellar reviews to pass this one up. A few chapters in the story is great and the characters are jumping out of the pages at me but I am not enamored with the prose. Coming from Borne, perhaps I was expecting too much in that department but so far, this one is a page turner with character.
The author is, I believe, 22, which may account for the disconnect in terms of prose. I know other people have complained about how the dialogue seems to modern for the setting. Still, not bad for a debut.
 

fbones24

Journeyed there and back again
#55
The author is, I believe, 22, which may account for the disconnect in terms of prose. I know other people have complained about how the dialogue seems to modern for the setting. Still, not bad for a debut.
Yeah, I can see that complaint. I think the main character used the word "gross" at one point and yes that created a disconnect. I had no idea the author was that young so I give much credit. I am further in and the characterization is incredible and I am already along for the ride.
 

GreyMouser

Journeyed there and back again
#56
DoD was probably my least favorite book in the series. The entire Snake arc bored the hell out of me.
I felt like my dreams were being turned to dust reading that arc.
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#57
„Spellslinger“ by Sebastien de Castell came up on my Amazon reading suggestions, I read the sample and enjoyed it a lot. Right now on book 3 and it is still going strong. First time I read de Castell, but I really like his style, the magic system, the twists in the story and everything else (apart from the fact it is likely another unfinished story that makes me wait a long time for the next book). Definitely a series I endorse here, will also look into his other books.
 

Khartun

Journeyed there and back again
#58
„Spellslinger“ by Sebastien de Castell came up on my Amazon reading suggestions, I read the sample and enjoyed it a lot. Right now on book 3 and it is still going strong. First time I read de Castell, but I really like his style, the magic system, the twists in the story and everything else (apart from the fact it is likely another unfinished story that makes me wait a long time for the next book). Definitely a series I endorse here, will also look into his other books.
I really enjoyed Greatcoats. This one sounds very YA to me though. Don't know if I'll try it or not.
 

Maark Abbott

Journeyed there and back again
#59
I felt like my dreams were being turned to dust reading that arc.
Then it served its purpose for what is the Snake if not a metaphor for the ruins of our dreams?
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#60
This one sounds very YA to me though
Definitely did not sound too „YA“ to me when I was reading it.

Yes, the protagonists are young, but that was the same in „Eye of the World“, or „Furies of Calderon“ (which was ya-ish to me).

Would compare it (positively) to the latter.

Would suggest to check out the free sample and see if you like it....
 
Last edited: