It's 2018!! January 2018. What fantasy books are you reading?

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
But I believe you’re in England (?) and you may not have been aware of this. Besides, you guys *and the rest of the world* call soccer football. **Which makes total sense since “football is a retarded name for our sport. And in”soccer”-everyone elses “football” you actually use your feet to control the ball.
American football was all but invented in England,
there were several different ways to play football, coming from the various colleges and as time wore on the rules varied further and further apart, most old ones are gone(two popular but extinct varieties are Crambridge Rules, and Sheffield rules) but there are lots of new ones. the most common being (in American tongue) Soccer, Gridiron Football, and Rugby, Aussie rules rugby, and gaelic football.

there are at least a dozen or two other varieties still played today, but I know very little of them nor their names. (the one on a hard court with the tiny ball is BRUTAL)

The Gridiron variety (American rules, Canadian rules, Arena, and flag) stems from an older version of rugby after being added to many American colleges several variants came about, gridiron outlasted the more kicking varieties.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
American football was all but invented in England,
there were several different ways to play football, coming from the various colleges and as time wore on the rules varied further and further apart, most old ones are gone(two popular but extinct varieties are Crambridge Rules, and Sheffield rules) but there are lots of new ones. the most common being (in American tongue) Soccer, Gridiron Football, and Rugby, Aussie rules rugby, and gaelic football.

there are at least a dozen or two other varieties still played today, but I know very little of them nor their names. (the one on a hard court with the tiny ball is BRUTAL)

The Gridiron variety (American rules, Canadian rules, Arena, and flag) stems from an older version of rugby after being added to many American colleges several variants came about, gridiron outlasted the more kicking varieties.
Of course I was just messing around. More of a self deprecating type of humor more than anything else. But I honestly didn’t know that football didn’t originate here. That’s interesting.I guess that explains where the dumb name came from. Well, at least basketball (Naismith) and baseball (Doubleday) originated here. Those names popped right in my head and are well known. I should’ve realized that there is a reason I didn’t know the football originator. Never thought about it. Maybe the guy who tweaked it is a name I should know.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
Well, at least basketball (Naismith) and baseball (Doubleday) originated here.
also many many.
lacrosse
stock car racing
barrel racing
lava racing
Chuck wagon racing
fowling
quidditch
eight ball
nine ball
ten pin
roller derby
speedball
frisbee
ultimate frisbee
disc golf
squash
that table tennis with walls
street luge.
and more I know not, or can't remember.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
also many many.
lacrosse
stock car racing
barrel racing
lava racing
Chuck wagon racing
fowling
quidditch
eight ball
nine ball
ten pin
roller derby
speedball
frisbee
ultimate frisbee
disc golf
squash
that table tennis with walls
street luge.
and more I know not, or can't remember.
Ouch. May a diseased yak squat in your hot tub.

That’s just embarrassing. Well, Frisbees have served a purpose. But that was bound to happen somewhere soon anyhow.
 

Maark Abbott

Journeyed there and back again
Had my first feedback on Incarnate. It seems to be rather polarising - About half so far have absolutely loved it (although they have had nits to pick, which is both fine and understandable), but were otherwise very positive in their response. The others have been somewhat negative in their criticism - not negative to the point that they abjectly hated it (Stormlight Syndrome, if you will), but certainly some harsh comments have been made. There may have been a Goodkind comparison. That hurt, you know!

EDIT: Over halfway through Deadhouse Landing and it's finally started to pick up.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
The Bear And The Nightingale. I loved it. Believable, complex and sympathetic characters. The weaving in of Russian history, folklore and myth. Well written dark fairy tale. Excellent pacing. Great debut. (I don’t know what’s happened here but I’ve thought the last three fantasy books written by females were terrific. Yes, that includes our own @jo zebedee. Before I could count them on like, maybe, one finger. (I feel the opposite with mysteries. I like the female writers infinitely better.

Damnit! This can indeed be read as a solo novel and I was going to stop here. Impossible. I could barely put this down. Guess I will just submit and pay the $12 and $15 for the final two short 350 page books. Well worth the price of admission!

Edit: Just realized I got to cross off four categories in Tom’s challenge. :)
 
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ExTended

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
The Bear and the Nightingale is indeed a top quality book. I haven't yet got to the rest of them, but the first one was a total delight almost from cover to cover.

And I've just finished with Knight's Shadow, the 2nd book in The Greatcoats series by Sebastien De Castell. It's dripping with quality. Literally dripping! It's the three musketeers on steroids. And it's not a flawless book, but so far the series is one of those rare things that makes you craving for more and more books to come, not just from the series itself, but as a whole. Impeccable fun!
 

TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
Now you're back @Jon Snow any chance you could look into the issue that is stopping new members from signing up? Not had a single one since some point near the end of last year when the forum was upgraded.
 

David Sims

Told lies with Locke
I finished The Mote in God's Eye and then started reading the sequel, The Gripping Hand. I lost interest in the sequel, however, and quit reading it about mid-way. Mote, itself, was only moderately good. Maybe it was the excessive use of military cliches and dutifulness leading to characters without much depth. Whatever it was, it seems to me that the Mote stories were over-rated. They aren't bad by any means, but darned if I can see why some folks think that they are classics.

Then I picked up Stephen R. Donaldson's Lord Foul's Bane, the first book in the Thomas Covenant series. The story is an obvious rip-off from J.R.R. Tolkien's Fellowship of the Ring, but it's a pretty good rip-off, as rip-offs go. There's even a
rape scene
(something Tolkien didn't do explicitly) early in the book, which has Thomas Covenant feeling guilty for the next several hundred pages. And the victim was
a girl who had been helpful to him!
But after that, it was pretty much straight out of the LOTR playbook. There was
a council,
and then
a journey,
with
pursuit and battle,
a teaming up with people who
tended wild horses,
and, instead of Mt. Doom, the bad guy lives in
Mt. Thunder.
My Kindle says I'm 75% done with Lord Foul's Bane. Again, this isn't the world's worst fantasy. It's pretty good. But it isn't going to knock your socks off like A Storm of Swords (Martin) might, or make you cry as Lord of Emperors (Kay) will.
 

Jon Snow

No Power in the Verse can stop me
Staff member
Now you're back @Jon Snow any chance you could look into the issue that is stopping new members from signing up? Not had a single one since some point near the end of last year when the forum was upgraded.
Hmmmm I'll ask Ben. Don't think I can change anything en masse.