It's December 2017: What SF books are you reading?

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#5
Read Artemis last week, meh.

Re-read the Imperial Radch trilogy after, much better :)
Now getting ready to read "Provenance"...

Not much time for reading (but a little), even less for posting on forums...
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#6
Reading "Provenance" now :)
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#7
finished lost world ~Arthur Conan Doyle (professor challenger)
and king Solomon's mines~h haggard (Allan quartermain)

without these two popular books we likely wouldn't have the inspired by books and movies of Jurassic park, Congo, and Indiana Jones.

but the original isn't also best. these just aren'
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#9
finished lost world ~Arthur Conan Doyle (professor challenger)
and king Solomon's mines~h haggard (Allan quartermain)

without these two popular books we likely wouldn't have the inspired by books and movies of Jurassic park, Congo, and Indiana Jones.

but the original isn't also best. these just aren'
I read around 30 classics over the last couple years (not nearly as many as you) including The Lost World and Poison Belt. I liked the former.

Doyle, Twain, and Dickens were my favorites. I read several from each. If you like Doyle be sure to read the two Brigadier General Gerard books (in order) if you haven’t yet. I found them quite funny. He tells of his adventures and is quite in love with himself. Both books are composed of short stories.

Old folks like me will remember the Old Commander Mcbrag shorts from The Underdog cartoon from the 60’. :)

1:30

 

TomTB

The Master Tweeter
Staff member
#10
Started Persepolis Rising by James SA Corey. Not spoiling anything by saying this one is set 30 years after the previous book, which was a bit of a WTF moment, but 3 hours into the audiobook and really enjoying it so far.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#11
Started Persepolis Rising by James SA Corey. Not spoiling anything by saying this one is set 30 years after the previous book, which was a bit of a WTF moment, but 3 hours into the audiobook and really enjoying it so far.
I was curious to see if you meant 30 years after the last Expanse book or something else. Goodreads and Wiki didn’t help but I found it elsewhere. I’m guessing it continues on with a certain characters life?

I know you really liked that series so I’m glad that it is continuing for you. You may remember I bought the entire series on a one day deal. I thought the stories were very creative and interesting but I couldn’t get past the writing style. Overall it was good (simple) but once I picked up on that weakness it drove me nuts. I finished since I owned them already. Someone else jumped on the deal but quit reading it. I told her it was worth finishing but I don’t think she did. Wish I could remember who that was and whether she read further.

There was one book I didn’t like (4 or 5 I think) as it was merely telling the story from a previous book through another POV. I read reviews afterward and a lot of people felt the same.It just seemed like laziness to myself and some others.
 

TomTB

The Master Tweeter
Staff member
#12
.

There was one book I didn’t like (4 or 5 I think) as it was merely telling the story from a previous book through another POV. I read reviews afterward and a lot of people felt the same.It just seemed like laziness to myself and some others.
I'm sure you're talking about Scalzi's Old Mans War series here, and not Expanse!?
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#13

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#14
I read around 30 classics over the last couple years (not nearly as many as you) including The Lost World and Poison Belt. I liked the former.

Doyle, Twain, and Dickens were my favorites. I read several from each. If you like Doyle be sure to read the two Brigadier General Gerard books (in order) if you haven’t yet. I found them quite funny. He tells of his adventures and is quite in love with himself. Both books are composed of short stories.

Old folks like me will remember the Old Commander Mcbrag shorts from The Underdog cartoon from the 60’. :)

1:30

wow thank you. I've kind f summarilycrossed Doyle off my "tbr" list, as I've taken Sherlock to as far as I'd like (to the first story after the writing hiatus) and was not thrilled with what was supposed to be his greatest prof challenger.

will add his general gerad books back on now.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#15
I'm sure you're talking about Scalzi's Old Mans War series here, and not Expanse!?
Duh!!. You are exaciitactatackally correct, good sir!!

I often confuse the name. I did read one of the Expanse books as opposed to (all?) 6 in Old Man’s. Wasn’t curious enough to read further in Expanse but WAS curious enough to check Wiki to see what happened to two characters (I’m sure you can guess which).

I enjoyed Old Man’s and just realized it had a greater effect on me than originally thought because I recall quite a bit which is usually a positive indicator.
 

Alice Sabo

Helped Logen count his fingers
#16
How funny - I was totally agreeing with you about the Expanse series. There is a book in the middle that didn't work for me. I loved 1& 2, maybe 3...it's been awhile. But then it changed to more space battles and politics and didn't work as well for me. I think they separated the crew which is always a killer. We have a joke in our house about separating Kirk and Spock. When the interaction of certain characters drives the story - don't separate them!
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#17
How funny - I was totally agreeing with you about the Expanse series. There is a book in the middle that didn't work for me. I loved 1& 2, maybe 3...it's been awhile. But then it changed to more space battles and politics and didn't work as well for me. I think they separated the crew which is always a killer. We have a joke in our house about separating Kirk and Spock. When the interaction of certain characters drives the story - don't separate them!
I always like to think of their perfect symmetry by way of transactional analysis.
Adult-Parent-Child.

Adult =Spock-pure reason and logic

Parent= Mccoy-chastising, DON’T/YOU SHOULD do this. “It is wrong or the right thing”,etc.

Child=Kirk- imaginative, impulse, temper, etc.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#19
finished
1984~George Orwell
animal farm ~ George Orwell
it can't happen hear~ lewis sinclair

The only one that's aged well is animal farm. it's ambiguous vague metaphor of Stalinism is still a portent of potential evil.

The other two are more a stale ominous warning of things that have already happened in the last 80 years. much like the last batch I read.

there is a specific difference from the main too. lewis describes a politician able to convince everyone they work for them, regardless of how many opposing promises made. they play the middle claiming the evils of "democratic fascism" and "Republican fascism". why don't we acknowledge both acknowledge both sides of evil these days?. it's always partisan.

1984, imagines a world where this has come to pass in the early fifties. still a portent of Stalinism it covers many historical mentions, like rewriting history as political favor turns. (we never do that in usa I swear........)

animal farm 10/10
1984 7/10
it can't happen hear 4/10