It's February 2019: What fantasy book are you reading?

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#41
I just finished 11.22.63 by Stephen King. It's a time travel story where a teacher goed back in time to try and stop the Kennedy assassination. It's a long and meandering book, with mediocre pacing, boring parts, some weird personal motivations at the side of the lead character and a downright weird ending. What saved the book for me was the meticulous historical detail (which was by and large correct) about the late 50's and early 60's. As always, King really pulls you into the story and lets you live and breathe it. There's also some awesome Dark Tower stuff in there (references to IT for example, with some recurring characters), which is cool. Still, this is far from his best book. I gave it 3/5 GoodReads Stars (let's say a 6.5/10).

I just received Kellanved's Reach in the mail (3/3 of the prequel trilogy).
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#42
No idea if you knew, but there's a TV series based on this book with the same name starring James Franco and Sarah Gadon as Jake and Sadie.

I haven't read the book, but I've liked the series quite much. It's a solid 7/10 or 7.5/10 series and it's really well-done as far as the costumes/shooting sets are concerned, it really feels like going back in time. :)
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#43
No idea if you knew, but there's a TV series based on this book with the same name starring James Franco and Sarah Gadon as Jake and Sadie.

I haven't read the book, but I've liked the series quite much. It's a solid 7/10 or 7.5/10 series and it's really well-done as far as the costumes/shooting sets are concerned, it really feels like going back in time. :)
Thanks for the rec. Yeah, I had heard of it, but I haven't gotten around to seeing it yet.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#44
I'm still reading Dark Forge. It goes well, it's interesting, but somewhat different from the first book. The coming of age element in the sense of finding out more about the world as others know it from the first book sifts towards coming of age on the inside, i.e. finding the balance between doing too much or too little with the talents you've been given, whether in war or outside of it. It's interesting, but I am yet unsure if I'd like this book as much as the first one. So far it's more sporadic and aimless, and I'm not a fan of sporadic and aimless. But it's improving as time passes, so there's that.

I'm also reading The Tower of the Swallow or some such, i.e. Witcher 6( or some such, depending on how you're counting them). It's far, far better than 5 and 4. Basically everything should be better than 4 and 5 by default. I DNFed 5 at least 2-3 times in 2017 and 2018 even though I was 90% through it already. So yeah - it's still a series I wouldn't recommend to a friend, but it might grow to be a series I wouldn't curse about in the future. The damnest thing is that there's so much potential, but the way I don't feel connected to even a single character after 6 books is... amazing. It's just that they either lack any relate-able characteristics or their relate-able characteristics are vastly "outshone" by the ways in which those characters manage to appall or annoy me. I'm really rooting for this book to be at least 7/10, although it would need to better to get there.

I'm also reading The Ruin of Kings by some debuting fantasy author with Tor. I went in this book with expectations for it to suck balls or even worse, since I've found about it from r/fantasy and my luck with their over-hyped books was mixed in the past, but so far the book is far more complex and interesting than I expected. It's a really simple story told in a really not simple way. That fascinates me. What do I mean here? We have one main "current days" story that's happening, and one flashback story that is giving us context as time passes. However, the author has managed to present said story through multiple POVs without it technically being presented through multiple point of views. Something like a detective/historian supplying the reader with the flashbacks. We also have a 3rd narrator mockingly interjecting himself while the main narrator does the "current days" story, to correct or extrapolate on what this character is trying to say/hide/obscure from the reader. It's a very cool way of throwing world-building stuff towards the reader in a non-intrusive way. I like it. :) Still, the story is as of yet - nothing special. It hovers between okay and interesting for the most part and tbh I'm fine with that. :)

After finishing my Stormlight re-read I've also dived in into a Night Angel trilogy re-read. I still consider it to be as much worthy of attention as The Lightbringer series from the same author, for the mindless fun factor if nothing else. It's a story that relies strongly on tight plot and fast-paced happenings, and you have to spend much less time between the epic moment as opposed to The Lightbringer series.

I've tried my luck with The Rivers of London but I ended up DNFing the thing. It's not my cup of tea and I've had troubles following the story while I was working. It's partly the narration, partly the fact that the story took too much time fidgeting around. I also didn't care for the crime mystery all that much. It's a good book that's simply not very appealing to a person who isn't too much into detective urban fantasy.

EDIT: The new Awaken Online book is coming out in just a couple of days for the people who are following the series. I remember a person or two was on the band-wagon with me on this one. Although the not so exciting news is that the author has failed to meet his audiobook deadline this time, so we'd be getting the audiobook in 2 months time, which is a shame, because I needed to be on that band-wagon right about now. To everyone who's curious about LitRPG - this is the series for you to try. If you don't like Awaken Online, you aren't likely to enjoy anything else from this fnatasy sub-genre. :)
 
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Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#46
Just finished Doughnut Economics. A must-read in my view. One of the most engaging non-fiction books I've read in the past years. It completely changed my view of how economics should work. I don't know about you lads and lasses, but in my view one of the most satisfying things is to see a long held belief turned topsy-turvy and replaced by a profound new insight. Can definitely recommend this one!

I've now dived into Kellanved's Reach (Malazan prequel 3/3).
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#47
Finished the wonderful Redemption's Blade, first of a new series by Adrian Tchaikovsky. Now I've started Deadhouse Landing.