It's January 2017. What fantasy book(s) are you reading?

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#22
I guess, but I think I will want to read it in publishing order. That's usually the best.
I don't wish to belabour the point, but given the size of it, and the number of changes in tone and character, Discworld might be one of the exceptions. Personally I always recommend reading it by series and that would go double for people who like concentrating on one series at a time.

You know your mind best though.

Anyway, me, I'm picking up The Woven Ring by Matticus again. I was getting nicely into it over the holidays, then I stalled a little, then holidays happened, and now its time to get back to it.
 

Theophania

Journeyed there and back again
#23
Just started reading Gate of Sorrows - Japanese urban fantasy (in English!)

A series of murders shocks Tokyo’s Shinjuku ward, but Shigenori, a retired police detective, is instead obsessed with a gargoyle that seems to move. College freshman Kotaro launches a web-based investigation of the killer, and comes to find that answers may lie within an abandoned building in the center of Japan’s busiest neighborhood, and beyond the Gate of Sorrows.

It's apparently 'new adult', but I'm hoping it will be a good read all the same. According to reviews, the angst level is low, which is a good sign.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#24
I've recently finished the first two Graphic Audio books in the Widdershins Adventures series by Ari Marmell.

The first book is called Thief''s Covenant and the second is titled False Covenant.

I got the impression of it being a funny mix between Riyria Revelations by Michael J. Sullivan and Among Thiefs by Douglas Hullick. As in - the series is lighthearted and it gives the word simplistic a very posivite meaning, while at the same time you get some mystery-enwraped magic system/plot, combined with a little bit of a thieving guild theme ala Among Thieves.

It also has a very light, but refreshing, semblance to Discworld in the kind of humor the series portrays - it's a social commentary aimed to be funny, instead of judgy( well, not all of Discworld is that way, but I've said semblance, didn't I? :p ).

As far as plot goes - the first book is somewhat superior in that regard when compared to the second - I'd say it's because the first book takes the interlude approach in character motivations development and info-dumping, which is missing in the second one and is replaced by some romantic notions instead, which while not overwhelming is certainly one idea more than what the second book needed.

Other than that - you won't really sense how fast the time is passing with those books. They are relatively fast paced, the magic system while more on the Tolkien side of the scale( rather than the Sanderson side) is defined enough as to leave you satisfied when the plot is moved forward with its help. The premise of it is quite nice too - you know where the magic comes from and why, you just don't know about the specific things you could count on it doing and how often. I am not going to spoil it for you, though.

The cast of characters is likable enough. They won't stay with you the same way Mat Cauthon or The Bloody Nine will, but they won't annoy or bore you either.

As far as the story goes - it's action packed and straigth-forward, you`d probably be able to guess some of it too, but you won't be too annoyed when that happens.

I am not sure if it's a gunpowder fantasy or not - there are guns in it. I am not too familiar with the sub-genre, so no idea here. It's somewhat French Reineisance themed I think.

I'd give the first book 7/10 as far a literary value goes. 8/10 for entertaiment and 9/10 for making me want to read more( this last metric doesn't need to be specifically about the next book in the series). I usually give more head to the last two metrics rathen than the literary one, because if a book doesn't make me want to read more books, is it really that good a of book?

I'd give the second book 6.5 for literary value, 7.5 for entertaiment and 8 for making me to want to read more books immediately. It's slightly worse compared to the first book, but not as glaringly as Mistborn 2 was worse than Mistborn 1 in the original trilogy if you know what I mean. :)

Also the books are relatively small - 5-6 hours each, which after 40-45 hours per Stormlight Archive book( my last two reads) is kind of nice - getting the story resolved so fast.

Why I've bothered to write up so much about that series? No idea. Maybe it's probably because I am a fan of the thief-themed fantasy sub-genre and we get so few good things in it. Maybe it's because after Stormlight Archive I've needed something to increase my apetite for more new fantasy books and Ari Marmell`s books did just that.

Or maybe it's because I've needed something to do for half an hour while I was waiting for the pizza to arrive. Who knows. :)

But seriously - if you've liked Among Thieves - give those books a chance, they are quite different in tone, but nice enough to entertain.
 
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TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
#26
Started reading The Abject God by Mr B this morning. My memory is a bit sketchy with regards the earlier books, but still enjoying it a lot. 10% in and it's got 5* written all over it :)
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#27
I finished Unseen Academicals (Discworld 37), a book that left me disapointed (if you're curious why, read my review here).

I now started on I Shall Wear Midnight (Discworld 38), which is another YA book in the Tiffany Aching storyline.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#28
For my first book of 2017 I decided to start with something shorter to ease myself into reading. I know that sounds weird but I haven't really been reading for the past two months or so. I've been gaming and watching TV series instead. I'm still playing through Dragon Age Inquisition.
Anyway, Something Wicked This Way Comes is my first book by Ray Bradbury. It's part of Fantasy Masterworks collection.
The book is about two boys, 13 years old, who are very much like yin and yang in appearance and personality, but they are nonetheless best friends. One is born on October 30th, 1 min before midnight, and the other on October 31st, 1 min after midnight. I have a feeling that that detail is important.
They are next door neighbors and are always together. A week before their 14th birthday on October 24, Halloween comes early. This mystical, scary carnival rolls into town on a train, apparently manned by none, but the man in black suit. The boys witness ominous and utterly silent setting up of the tents orchestrated by some sort of magic. Everything so far points to this being some evil enterprise.

I'm still reading so I can't say much more, but the book really hooked me in at once. It's not just that it's atmospheric (because that's not enough for me), it also reads like a dream sequence at time. Some passages are straight up beautiful and evocative, and there's this sense of nostalgia you get from reading it. But it's not my nostalgia, it's Bradbury's.

So far, 1/3 in, a beautiful book. It would be perfect as Halloween read.
 

atheling

A Poet of the Khaiem
#30
Gardens of the Moon: I'm Restarting MBotF (just the Erikson books).

I probably won't read them straight through: I'll probably slip Terry Pratchett books in between (and maybe others).
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#31
Gardens of the Moon: I'm Restarting MBotF (just the Erikson books).

I probably won't read them straight through: I'll probably slip Terry Pratchett books in between (and maybe others).
See you in about 2020, I guess...
 

ReguIa

Journeyed there and back again
#32
It was slow going for me to start the Blinding Knife after reading pretty much non stop for a whole month before. Only 100 pages into it now but it already feels like a much better start than The Black Prism.
 

Bill Door

Killed a Balrog
#34
I just started Glen Cook's, 'The Instrumentalities of the Night'. Been 3 months or so since I did any serious reading, but I just read a short Elmore Leonard crime novel and it got me back into the swing of things.
 

MorteTorment

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#35
I've been reading quite a bit today.

Finished Certain Dark Things(where the author is called the next Anne Rice. So not true, but good book regardless).

And I read what is a total treat. Book 4 of The Dresden Files: Summer Knight. I went from a book that was so bad that I dropped it to the best in the series thus far. It's like this book did EVERYTHING right. Seriously, well fucking done Jim Butcher!

I also read through what was possibly the most boring book I've read, but it's sci-fi, so check out the sci-fi forum if you wanna know about that.
 

ReguIa

Journeyed there and back again
#36
And I read what is a total treat. Book 4 of The Dresden Files: Summer Knight. I went from a book that was so bad that I dropped it to the best in the series thus far. It's like this book did EVERYTHING right. Seriously, well fucking done Jim Butcher!
Summer Knight is indeed much better than the first 3. I'd say 4-6 are pretty much the same quality. With book 7 Butcher ups his game even more.

However I still think you should read Grave Peril if you're serious about continuing with the series. I think there's a WoJ that Grave Peril has perhaps the most important moment in the entire series. A choice or something that will end up affecting everything. I know it started slow, but if you enjoyed Storm Front and Fool Moon you really shouldn't have any problem with it.

As for my own reading, I'm 200 pages into The Blinding Knife and it's looking like it will be a fantastic read!
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#37
Finished book 4 of WOT. Best book so far imo. This had many plot lines with the characters scattered all over the world. I was interested in all the stories going on, more than book 3. And this book featured a lot of personal relationships that I enjoyed. Lastly, Perrin was featured heavily and he has become my favourite character.

5/5
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#38
On to The Malice by Peter Newman (in paper, bought it some time back from a UK-based seller on AbeBooks) and The Liberation by Ian Trigellis on Kindle.
 

Andrew.J

Journeyed there and back again
#39
I haven't touched a fantasy book in almost a month now *gasp*. Some stuff has been going on and I haven't been able to make any significant progress as far as fantasy's concerned (although I've finally dipped my toes into Russian literature and I'm also currently making a run at some German lit. too). Since I have a little more time nowadays, I'll try to get back into my regular reading and tv-show watching habits (been watching the same season for 3 months now). I'll be picking up Sword of Destiny (Witcher #2) from where I've left it and trying to squeeze in some time for Dresden Files, though I'm not sure how well that's going to work out, as I usually don't have many opportunities to listen to audiobooks. Really excited about the books I'm thinking of reading this year!

Anyway, just wanted to pop in and say hi. Happy New Year everyone.
 

MorteTorment

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#40
However I still think you should read Grave Peril if you're serious about continuing with the series. I think there's a WoJ that Grave Peril has perhaps the most important moment in the entire series. A choice or something that will end up affecting everything. I know it started slow, but if you enjoyed Storm Front and Fool Moon you really shouldn't have any problem with it.
Oh, I've already read a HUGE summary of the book. It's all good.