It's January 2019: What fantasy book are you reading?

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#1
Myself: I'm in a non-fiction reading stint for the time being. Reading some parenting books and such. How about you guys?

EDIT: HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE!
 
Last edited:

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#2
Reading 'Salem's Lot. Loving every minute of it. It's the second book Stephen King ever wrote (1st was Carrie), but it is like his first novel, since Carrie was so short. The man knew how to write suspense and build up horror and tension from the start of his career.

This year I have to finish last 3 books of the Dark Tower too. Seriously considering going on a King binge, until I'm bored of him :bookworm::joyful:
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#3
Bored Of The King. There's a book in there somewhere.

I just started Blood of Assassins after finishing Age of Assassins, a book with a lot of debut-like tripping over your feet writing. The second book is from the beginning much better as far as the writing goes. The story is appealing enough to keep me going and I will probably read the third book in The Wounded Kingdom series. The book stars the best assassins of all as the good guys/heroes/protagonists, and is set in a land decimated physically by sorcerers as a side effect of their magic, as well as an ascension fight between three king-candidates in a knights in armor type of medieval setting. My kudos to the author, RJ Parker, for getting a lot better as a writer for the second book.

After the third book of this series it will hopefully be January 17 because that's the day King Of Ashes will be released. It's the second book after the superlative Kings of Paradise in the Ashes and Sand series by Richard Nell. Two days after that Rob Hayes' new book, Never Die, will drop.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#4
Reading 'Salem's Lot. Loving every minute of it. It's the second book Stephen King ever wrote (1st was Carrie), but it is like his first novel, since Carrie was so short. The man knew how to write suspense and build up horror and tension from the start of his career.

This year I have to finish last 3 books of the Dark Tower too. Seriously considering going on a King binge, until I'm bored of him :bookworm::joyful:
When I finish with my current book, I'm going to start on Pet Cemetery. I've read pretty much all of King's books but somehow I never got around to reading this one. I heard it's especially gruesome if you have young kids. Not sure why, so I'm probably going to be very surprised.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#5
When I finish with my current book, I'm going to start on Pet Cemetery. I've read pretty much all of King's books but somehow I never got around to reading this one. I heard it's especially gruesome if you have young kids. Not sure why, so I'm probably going to be very surprised.
Go for it.

I thought about reading King chronologically, to really get into and enjoy the way he developed his universe, but then The Dark Tower and IT got in the way and I couldn't wait so I read them. But Carrie was my first King book, and I liked that too.
 

Bill Door

Killed a Balrog
#6
I'm about a quarter through the last book in the Codex Alera series, First Lord's Fury.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#8
Bored Of The King. There's a book in there somewhere.

I just started Blood of Assassins after finishing Age of Assassins, a book with a lot of debut-like tripping over your feet writing. The second book is from the beginning much better as far as the writing goes. The story is appealing enough to keep me going and I will probably read the third book in The Wounded Kingdom series. The book stars the best assassins of all as the good guys/heroes/protagonists, and is set in a land decimated physically by sorcerers as a side effect of their magic, as well as an ascension fight between three king-candidates in a knights in armor type of medieval setting. My kudos to the author, RJ Parker, for getting a lot better as a writer for the second book.

After the third book of this series it will hopefully be January 17 because that's the day King Of Ashes will be released. It's the second book after the superlative Kings of Paradise in the Ashes and Sand series by Richard Nell. Two days after that Rob Hayes' new book, Never Die, will drop.
Huh. I much preferred the first book. Just enjoyed Girton's voice a lot more in it.

Anyway.

I finished City of Brass by SA Chakraborty, which is a fun portal fantasy set in a Middle Eastern style city of Djinn. Upside is good politics, setting and writing. Downside is the pacing is way off. Characters seem to be a curate's egg going from reviews, although I mostly enjoyed reading about them. There's also a fair amount of grievance from Muslim book reviewers on GR who thought they were getting a fantasy that featured a lot of characters from their faith in a positive light and didn't get it - I didn't have that premise going in so it didn't bother me, but I can see what they're talking about.

Now reading something by Leigh Bardugo. So good I've forgotten the name. Yup. Actually I was upset when I had to get off the train and stop reading to be fair.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#9
Huh. I much preferred the first book. Just enjoyed Girton's voice a lot more in it.
Funny, I came to post that I just gave up on book 2 at 40%. The first gave me minor vibes of YA but this one seems to be more so and the plot is wandering all over the Tired Lands. Back to Morningstar although the beginning is getting old with his treatment by the Jackal. Hope it picks up.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#11

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#12

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#13
This one right here: https://www.audible.de/pd/The-Stand-Hoerbuch/B0077DE6JY
I have it on my audible. It's an audio of The Complete and Uncut Edition.

Is that good?
I'm trying to figure out who that is on the creepy cover from the story. Might be...well never mind. Is that a bullet in his teeth? And what is that wavy line across his cheek? Silvion, any ideas?

Alucard, you've got the right one. I didn't know there was more than one to tell you the truth. There are two locations in the book that are close to places I lived in Boulder, sort of creeped me out.

Oh, so yesterday I found a 171 page novella by Richard Nell of Kings of Paradise fame, and read it in one go. The writing was great. Called Devil of the 22nd. Now I'm trying The Library of Mount Char again. I think my problem is trying to figure out what's going on. I should just go along for the ride.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#14
I'm trying to figure out who that is on the creepy cover from the story. Might be...well never mind. Is that a bullet in his teeth? And what is that wavy line across his cheek?
It is a bullet and the line is actually smoke.
No idea on who is he supposed to represent yet. I'm on Chapter 13.
 

Matticus Primal

Journeyed there and back again
#16
I just finished Library at Mount Char a few days ago and would give it a 3* and consider that generous. I think it's of a literary fiction bent because the plotting was all over the place, the pacing terrible, and the big twist basically took away all the agency of the protag... not that it mattered since the climax was resolved 75% of the way in. Great concept and some interesting characters, but just a mess in terms of execution.

I started Jade City but had to put it down in favor of some books on worldbuilding and Greek mythology.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#17
I just finished Library at Mount Char a few days ago and would give it a 3* and consider that generous. I think it's of a literary fiction bent because the plotting was all over the place, the pacing terrible, and the big twist basically took away all the agency of the protag... not that it mattered since the climax was resolved 75% of the way in. Great concept and some interesting characters, but just a mess in terms of execution.

I started Jade City but had to put it down in favor of some books on worldbuilding and Greek mythology.
As in, how to do worldbuilding?


I just finished Spellslinger by Sebastien de Castell. Its a slow starter for me, but it really sparks and takes off towards the middle and its a great twisty book... until it decides that how I want to finish a really fun mystery book is with a giant fight that takes forever. That is most incorrect. But it didn't detract too much.

What did detract a little was the black and white nature of many characters and other elements; I ask those who've read his other stuff, is that him or is that just him writing YA?

I'm now reading Forge of Darkness by Eriksen. The style - a deliberate throw back to narrated detail heavy epic fantasy - is quite stodgy and offputting. I'd probably not be reading this if I didn't want to give Eriksen a go all the way through and my library wasn't short of the first two books of Malazan.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#18
I'm trying to figure out who that is on the creepy cover from the story. Might be...well never mind. Is that a bullet in his teeth? And what is that wavy line across his cheek? Silvion, any ideas?

Alucard, you've got the right one. I didn't know there was more than one to tell you the truth. There are two locations in the book that are close to places I lived in Boulder, sort of creeped me out.

Oh, so yesterday I found a 171 page novella by Richard Nell of Kings of Paradise fame, and read it in one go. The writing was great. Called Devil of the 22nd. Now I'm trying The Library of Mount Char again. I think my problem is trying to figure out what's going on. I should just go along for the ride.
Could be

Randyl Flag, aka the man in black?
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#19
Could be

Randyl Flag, aka the man in black?
Exactly.

So yesterday in my desperation I found another 132-page novella by Mr. Nell and devoured it. But that's it, that's all I get until Kings of Ash. The quirkiness of Library At Mount Char is appealing to me so I'm going to keep reading it and Prayers In Steel by Michael McClung, who wrote the Thief Who... books.
 

Matticus Primal

Journeyed there and back again
#20
As in, how to do worldbuilding?
Yeah, the exemplar in the micro-subgenre is a textbook by Wolf on worldbuilding, but it's an academic work that examines it over the ages as a cross-media experience (video games and the like), while I'm much more interested in the application of worldbuilding specifically to fantasy authors/ fans. There's no real unified theory as how to assess good/ bad worldbuilding, so I'm trying to put one together.

Turns out Tolkien spent a lot of time thinking about worldbuilding as a concept, not just his own worlds, and gave some lectures on the subject back in the 50s. Sanderson's four laws also come up, as well as Clark's writings, but for the most part, this is white space on the fantasy map. Metaphorically speaking, of course.