It's March 2019: What fantasy book are you reading?

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#1
New month, new thread.

I'm still reading Vengeful, sequel to Vicious and it's mediocre imo. I'm probably 2/3 finished and this book didn't need to be written. The first book was fine on it's own. After an initially good opening the book really slows down and it takes awhile to pick up. We are finally getting somewhere but the point/purpose of this book is nowhere near as interesting as Vicious. And I really liked Victor in the first book. I don't like him very much in this book.
 

GreyMouser

Journeyed there and back again
#2
I started reading Age of Assassins by RJ Barker 2 days ago and will probably be finished tomorrow because it's really hard to put down.
 
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kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#3
I finished Deadhouse Landing and what a great book that is. This origin story trilogy is exactly what the Malazan world needed, and I am so glad that I only have to wait one month for Kellanved's Reach. Those two are such wonderful characters and the touch of lightness to their adventures makes the tale so much more enjoyable. Since I'm in that world already I've started Stonewielder, and the lack of a little humor in that series is sorely missed.
 
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ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#4
I'm still on Dark Forge, The Tower of the Swallow and The Ruin of Kings.

I've finished with Shadow's Edge and went on to 3rd book in my Night Angel trilogy re-read.

I must say though... the way The Witcher series is written is a complete disgrace in so many levels, I am really surprised that I haven't put it down again. One of the main characters who let's say is having a coming of age arc has gone from scared child, to bad-ass swords-woman, to remorslessly( and with no warning) killing strangers for lewd comments towards her, to screaming "YOU CAN'T MAKE ME KILL NO MATTER WHAT" with basically zero build-up, character arc reasons or anything at all.

Characters are constantly falling in love, having deep sexual relationships, breaking up with zero seconds warning, then pining for their loved ones, then rinse and repeat.

I mean... he probably has Terry Goodkind on fast dial or something. I hate being super negative towards a series, but I like linear stories with characters that make sense. Contradictory characters - sure, bring em on. But characters who act like 7 different people in one body, having turns on who's in charge every other viewpoint - yeah, that's pathetic. And it's basically all the damn characters in the series, except maybe the comic relief character who doesn't have any arc to speak of.
 

Noor Al-Shanti

Is a wondrous friend of modest Kruppe
#5
I had placed Children of Blood and Bone on hold from my library a while ago and it's finally my turn at it... not that impressed so far, but I'm going to try to give it more of a chance before giving up on it.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#6
I just finished Kellanved's Reach, book 3/3 of the Malazan prequel trilogy about the rise of Kellanved and Dancer. This book was a lot of fun. The chemistry between all main characters is amazing and a lot of legends from the Malazan main series are "fleshed out" by reading the trilogy.

Too bad this was the final book, as I am dying to read more about the early days of the Malazan empire.

I've started on a non-fiction book about the reasons around why islamic countries are in general economically, socially and politically unstable. Interesting stuff.
 

Ryan W. Mueller

Journeyed there and back again
#7
I'm currently working on four books. I've been making a concerted effort to read more and more indie titles. It started as a desire to see what's doing well in self-published fantasy to help with my own efforts. The surprising part is how much I'm enjoying most of them. Many of them don't quite have the polish of trade-published titles, but there's a lot of great storytelling out there.

Dragon Bond by D.K. Holmberg. This is the fourth book in a series that I'm really enjoying.

Storm Glass by Jeff Wheeler. I'm only a little bit into it so far, and I'm not exactly sure where the story is going, but it's pretty good.

Valley of Embers by Steven Kelliher. I'm enjoying this one as well. I'm not very far yet, so I can't pass much of a judgment.

Child of the Daystar by Bryce O'Connor. It started out slow, but I'm just getting to the part where I think the story is really going to take off.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#8
I can't recommend you Dawn of Wander by Jonathan Renshaw or the Awaken Online series by Travis Bagwell enough. Both are very, very polished for self-published books.

And if you're after a trad pub contract in the future, the successful self-publishing to trad publishing transition guys like Michael J. Sullivan, Anthony Ryan and Josiah Bancroft are a great read indeed.
 

Ryan W. Mueller

Journeyed there and back again
#9
I can't recommend you Dawn of Wander by Jonathan Renshaw or the Awaken Online series by Travis Bagwell enough. Both are very, very polished for self-published books.

And if you're after a trad pub contract in the future, the successful self-publishing to trad publishing transition guys like Michael J. Sullivan, Anthony Ryan and Josiah Bancroft are a great read indeed.
I really enjoyed Dawn of Wonder. I've also loved pretty much everything by Michael J. Sullivan. Senlin Ascends was great. I was a bit disappointed in Queen of Fire by Ryan, but I loved the first two books of the series. I still need to read his Draconis Memoriae series (I hope I spelled that right).

I'll have to look into Awaken Online. I've enjoyed Rick Scott's Dodge Tank and Phil Tucker's Euphoria Online trilogy in the LitRPG realm.
 

Khartun

Journeyed there and back again
#10
There isn't a March thread in SF so I'll post it here.

I just started Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds. Seems to be a pretty popular series.
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#11
Finished Vengeful. The book was simply Unnecessary. It pales in comparison to Vicious which was fantastic. It gets off to an interesting start and then slows down as we catch up to the old gang who don’t have a great plot. This book was written to make money and there is no need to read really. Victor is far less likeable in this book and the whole thing was on the slow and pointless side. The ending was interesting and the author is clearly setting up for book 3. No thanks. A 3/5 is generous.

3/5
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#12
I've finished my Night Angel trilogy re-read. It's shapes out to be one of my yearly re-read series alongside Stormlight, Riyria and The Kingkiller Chronicles. Unlike the latter three it's not one of my favorites or even close to them, but it's the best less known series out there, or one of the best. I'd say that as far as Brent Weeks' books go, The Night Angel trilogy has a much nicer pacing than The Lightbringer series, and each book in the trilogy is very strong in terms of consistent quality, unlike his latest series where the 3rd and the 4th book could've been easily condensed into a single entry.

I'm closing the distance on Dark Forge, The Ruin of Kings and The Witcher 6, but my progress on all of those is somewhat slow. Dark Forge seems to be picking itself together towards the end, while the other two books are still directionsless with not much to go till their end. A bit disappointing, but hardly unexpected.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#13
So, I've finished with two new books.

1. Dark Iron by Miles Cameron. It was a decent addition to the 1st book, but it's clearly a 2nd book in a trilogy with all the presumptions you could extrapolate from that statement. The book reads pretty much as a decently written filler - it's less about day-to-day struggles of a young man in a big city and more about the day-to-day struggles of said young man while he's involved into military and battle situations/dilemmas. The book suffers from the lack of major conflict or resolution point and while the first book didn't have those either, not pre-defined ones at least, it did have an outstandingly good pacing and change of scenery/circumstances often enough to compensate of its lacks. This book isn't so fortunate. I can give it a slightly generous 8/10. The thing is - everything except the plot is either 9/10 or 10/10, but the lack of direction really drags everything down. As far as world-building goes, or daily troubles, the good/bad parts about being a soldier etc. goes, it's an excellent book. The character development is inferior to book one, but still good. So it's a positive 8/10 with the hopes that the pace and everything else would be more polished in book 3, which should be the final one in this series, it being a trilogy and all that.

On another note I've finished The Ruin of Kings by Jenn Lyons. This is a hard book to review, since I have a real passionate dislike for books that preach politics day in and day out, and that book is somewhat that. The story steers between being interesting and being mundane, the main character steers between being relate-able and being a total moron, but it's as a whole a well written book. However, there are four major cons.
1. Left politics every 2nd or 3rd chapter.
2. Mary Sue main character( at times). Or Gary Stu, since he is a male. It's just his way of being competent at one point and totally out of his depth in the very next chapter. It makes the two opposites quite quite hard to believe.
3. It's often a damn soap opera in terms of who's related to whom, who is secretly who, how, why... argh, it's mind-boggling. I still don't know who half of those people are, and I've read the book. It's like if you've mixed 4 family trees, with 10 cups of love triangles, 3 teaspoons of reincarnation magic and you stir well with Deus Ex Machina. And there you have it. A Song of Ice and Fire has nothing in terms of family tree complexity compared to this book.
4. It's kind of related to point 3 - listening to the audio book is a nightmare, due to the way in which all character names literally sound the same when pronounced. Or close enough. I've mostly been "reading" to this book while doing some light work on Photoshop and the likes, and I'm usually quite good at not missing things out in that work regime, but man... I gave up on following who's who after the first 5-10 chapters. Theran, Thearan, Daran, Maran, Faran, Baran and Bilbo to close the door please.

Over-all I'd give this book 6.9/10. It's not a bad book, but it comes with lots of baggage. Its main saving grace is the unending sense of mystery, since the story unfolds in two main time-lines, current days and "at some point in the past" and both are really well intertwined. I'm 55% sure that I would've continued with the sotry if there was a 2nd book available, but this one seems to be self-contained in the terms in which The Last Empire is self-contained( many a times authors will aim to write a first book with clear beginning and end, in case they don't get to publish the other books in the series and as far as those one-book-stories-with-potential-sequal goes, this one is fine).

So there's that.

I've also started with Minimum Wage Magic by Rachel Aaron and Sabriel by Garth Nix. The latter is more up my alley, but I'd reserve my judgement for the DFZ book until a later point, since I like Rachel Aaron's world well-enough from her Heartstrikers series.

I've also started The Lightbringer series re-read and I'll probably continue reading The Hod King by Josiah Bancroft, plus I'm almost finished with The Witcher book 6. Exciting times. :)

I've been hopping through books in the last month due to non-work related busy-ness and constantly being tired from frequent traveling, but now I'm back in my hobbit-hole, so hopefully my reading will go more smoothly. :)
 
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ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#15
Currently reading the Dragon’s Path by Daniel Abraham. Slow start and I’m not sure what the overall plot is but I’ve been introduced to five characters, all fairly interesting. Will see where this goes.
This is one of the slowest series ever, but believe it or not, it works perfectly with the type of read it is. One of my all time favorite reads - moves like sweet honey on a piece of bread. The narration is nothing short of mesmerizing too. :)
 

ReguIa

Journeyed there and back again
#16
Been in a reading slump for a while so to get into it again I gave the Iron Druid series a try. I think I added it to my list when @Alucard mentioned it way, way back. I got 200 pages in before I took a break when I got my hands on Tiamat's Wrath almost 2 weeks early. I finished that one in only 2 days. That has to be a personal record for me. But yea Iron Druid is looking good so far, quite similar to Dresden Files which is a big plus for me.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#17
This is one of the slowest series ever, but believe it or not, it works perfectly with the type of read it is. One of my all time favorite reads - moves like sweet honey on a piece of bread. The narration is nothing short of mesmerizing too. :)
I wish I'd like that book more as Abraham writes very well and had an interesting premise, but I found nothing as interesting as the prologue and very rapidly wanted to see half the major characters deleted from the book.
 

ReguIa

Journeyed there and back again
#19
On to Iron Druid book 3 now. 2 was just as enjoyable as the first one. Exactly what I needed, too many of the books I've read recently have been in the 500-1000 pages area. Too many of those and I eventually have a difficult time getting into something new.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#20
Finished the First Formic War trilogy and began the first book of the second Formic war, The Swarm, and I also opened up Raymond Feist's new (well kind of new, May of 2018) King of Ashes which looks very promising. More grit than his previous books right out of the gate, definitely grimdark.
 
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