It's May 2018: What fantasy book are you reading?

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#81
Is Feist even worth reading @Peat?
I have an impression of him being a second tier, or even third tier writer along the likes of Salvatore or Goodking. You know, the stuff good for people new to the fantasy genres or kids, but not really material worth reading if you're a more experienced reader.
@Peat has it right.

In my opinion Feist is either the worst of the best or the best of the worst, take that for what it's worth.

My first encounter with him was in high-school, after reading LOTR and WoT, so I wasn't super experienced in the genre, and this most likely helped with me not being put off by all the tropes he has. That being said, I am pretty sure I'd still enjoy his older book, as a guilty pleasure read if nothing else. That being said - his characters are usually more interesting than his plots, barring a book or two.

I've read 8 books of his a few years back, where I've had a lot more experience with the genre. Still enjoyed the way he throws trope after trope at you. He is crap at conflicts though. So if you've read 10 books of his, he won't be able to surprise you, but most of the time he is just decent enough not to make you quit. So I guess that's a positive? :p

For me the biggest draw of his books is the familiarity. You always know what to expect with good old Feist. You're not always in the mood for trope-heavy just decently enough written books, but when you are, he's golden.
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#82
The Graveyard Book. Neil Gaiman. I really enjoyed it. Creepy. Eeire. Original. There were quite a few parts that had me on the edge of my seat.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#83
Not yet Finished with
Le Morte D'Arthur ~ Thomas Malory

I get the sense of " Bro Knights" from this even though this is from 5 centuries ago. lot of bromances as the knights travel from area to area bumping chests with fellow bros, and recruiting as the go.

there is a lot of beheading of woman. the most shocking is Bedivere. Lancelot finds him chasing a woman down with a sword and murder in his eyes. He intends to behead his wife for being unfaithful, she denies it and Lancelot says he will not allow it. Lancelot says he will give them both safe passage and walks between them. Bedivere pulls the "look over there!!! what is that?" and steps aside and beheads his wife. Lancelot threatens him with a duel and reveals his name which is enough to scare Bedivere to his core. Bedivere is then forced to carry his wifes body and head the several days ride to Camelot and beg forgiveness of King Arthur and Gueneviere. He then becomes a Hermit and when he comes back he is so noble and so much a good knight he is then called Bedivere the Wise.

Lot of the book is stories we all should know already, the stuff that's new to me, is exicting.

The book is written in Middle English, but although it is a century older than Shakespeare it is more comprehensible, more readable. I suppose Shakespeare is stylized and flowery for the theatre, but Malory is real in his language, This book might be a better guide to what Middle English was, I at least found it much more enjoyable to read than ANY of Shakespeares works, (which I reread all of earlier this year)
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#84
I have an idea of how the Bedivere story would play out in a movie in this Gimdark atmosphere. I imagine we would see Bedieverre in a small tavern with his headless wife sitting opposite him (on his jorney to Camelot) toasting to her with a beer and even having a whole conversation.

This invaded my thoughts to even showing up in my dream.
 

Andrew.J

Journeyed there and back again
#85
The book is written in Middle English, but although it is a century older than Shakespeare it is more comprehensible, more readable. I suppose Shakespeare is stylized and flowery for the theatre, but Malory is real in his language, This book might be a better guide to what Middle English was, I at least found it much more enjoyable to read than ANY of Shakespeares works, (which I reread all of earlier this year)
Shakespeare wrote in early modern English, though. That's why the language, barring stylistic differences, is easily understandable. Middle English for all intents and purposes is a completely different language. Could it be that you're reading a modern English translation of Le Morte? If not, that's very impressive. :)

Either way, would Le Morte d'Arthur be a good starting point for someone with little knowledge of the Arthurian legends? I've wanted to read some Arthurian tales ever since I watched Merlin (TV series) years ago but never got around doing it.
 
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Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#86
. Middle English for all intents and purposes is a completely different language. Could it be that you're reading a modern English translation of Le Morte? If not, that's very impressive. :)

.
I knew not really as I know little of the topic. so I looked it up to answer. according to both amazon and B&N I have a first American printing of Eugene Vinavers publication. the bluntly state the text is not touch except to reorganize it. the cover only states edited.

I don't know if that means I am reading middle english but I am finding it as easy to read as modern english, and more than Shakespeare.

if it is not middle english the choices for spelling is weird and nonsensical.

sample :
'Fayre knyght,' seyde sir Trystram, 'telle me youre name, I requyre you.'
'Sir knyght, wite you well my name ys sir Uwayne, le Fyze de Roy Ureyne.'
'A' seyde sir Trystram, ' be my wylle I wolde nat have ado with you at no tyme.'

that's pretty much it, I am used to reading stuff like this, like Irving Welsh it seems written how it sounds rather than how is proper. there are spots here and there of simple French or German sometimes other languages sprinkled in almost rarely, but these are very simple words that don't even illicit a pause in my reading. like "con courte"
everyone should know what con means

I don't truly know really if it is middle english, I just cannot find texts saying it isn't, and several that insist it is the original I find zero difficulty with it as it is a very simple speaking structure, not the overinduldged fancy speaking structure of Shakespeare. also unlike Shakespeare the choice of words are always towards "keep it simple" and in relative terms I would say Shakespeare sleeps on his thesaurus, Malory has never seen one.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#87
That's much easier than reading Iain M. Banks' Feersum Endjinn. I read Le Morte long long ago but haven't seen it written out in all that time. Not bad at all.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#88
*scratches beard*

I think for some people that would be a fair assessment. Its very traditional feeling in just about every sense; it might just be so generic that it's gone past being generic as nobody really has all those 'classic' fantasy tropes in one book... except Feist.

But I did start my mad bout of re-reading because a very experienced fantasy reader was talking about reading one of the later Feist books - one of the ones I'd remembered as being pretty meh - and enjoying it. So after that thread I went back to see for myself and ended up knocking out 10 books in a week (it will probably be 11 by the end of today, and the 11th comes to 800-some pages in my e-reader). He is very good at what he does and I think even a lot of experienced fantasy readers would enjoy his books - providing they know what they're letting themselves in for and it's what they want. I have a pretty high tolerance for 80s/90s fantasy tropes but I know a lot of other long time fantasy readers don't.
10 books in a week is insane and impressive. :D Glad you're enjoying it.
I have Riftwar saga's first book on my PTR, but it's not really a priority. Somehow these older books rarely make the cut for me.
Still, I might read it eventually. It's not that big.


For me the biggest draw of his books is the familiarity. You always know what to expect with good old Feist. You're not always in the mood for trope-heavy just decently enough written books, but when you are, he's golden.
I see. Good to remember it like that. Thanks.


'Fayre knyght,' seyde sir Trystram, 'telle me youre name, I requyre you.'
'Sir knyght, wite you well my name ys sir Uwayne, le Fyze de Roy Ureyne.'
'A' seyde sir Trystram, ' be my wylle I wolde nat have ado with you at no tyme.'
This looks like modern version of texting when the person is really bad at it :D
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#89
10 books in a week is insane and impressive. :D Glad you're enjoying it.
I have Riftwar saga's first book on my PTR, but it's not really a priority. Somehow these older books rarely make the cut for me.
Still, I might read it eventually. It's not that big.
Yeah, I'm pretty glad that week is over in a way. Was great fun to be that immersed, but nice to have a life again. Hmm. I wonder if I could re-read the whole Wheel of Time in two weeks?

Aaaanyway. Since I've yet to finish talking about this -

I think on the non-priority list is the right place for you to put his books. I also think Feist's best work was done in the Serpentwar and Empire series (co-written with Wurts), but they're not first in continuity, and it's not a big deal either.


Finally... I find Feist hugely frustrating as an author at times, because he has a lot of really awesome ideas then just skips along without exploring them or tying them into the plot properly. It gets the more frustrating the more you go on (I am now firmly convinced he stopped listening to his editor if he even had one sometime around series 8 of the whole damn thing).

If I ever become a billionaire, I'm hiring someone to rewrite his books to my satisfaction.


I'm now currently dipping into Sir Edric and the Plague, a Blackadder-Flashman style fantasy that is frustrating me also a little as its fun but needs less comedy and more drama/plot for my liking (in much the same way Pratchett became a lot better *and* funnier when he stopped sticking a pun on every page).
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#90
Yeah, I'm pretty glad that week is over in a way. Was great fun to be that immersed, but nice to have a life again. Hmm. I wonder if I could re-read the whole Wheel of Time in two weeks?
).
Two weeks? Took me about a year to read that series! 14 books plus a prequel and they probably average 800 pages a book. I know you just speed read a ton but a book a day for 14 days seems impossible.

On page 75 of the Farseer Trilogy, first book. It’s very well written although slow early on. I like it.
 

Matticus Primal

Journeyed there and back again
#91
Two weeks? Took me about a year to read that series! 14 books plus a prequel and they probably average 800 pages a book. I know you just speed read a ton but a book a day for 14 days seems impossible.

On page 75 of the Farseer Trilogy, first book. It’s very well written although slow early on. I like it.
I swear Farseer is the slowest book that I've ever enjoyed. And, since I did enjoy it, I guess that makes it "deliberate" rather than "slow." Reckon that makes it "deliberate as molasses."
 

Kevin O Donoghue

Knows how to pronounce Kvothe
#92
Read Wraith of Empire and Grey Sister in the past few days. Really enjoyed both. Was looking forward to reading both books since pre ordering them ages ago. I think that I will read them again and enjoy them a bit more.
 

Davis Ashura

Mixes poisons and sharpens knives with Kylar
#93
I finally read The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson and loved it. I think most people have a sense of the story, so I'll pass on describing it. I also came across a very good indie novel, Rage of Dragons by Evan Winters. It's described as Game of Thrones meets Gladiator on Arrakis, and while that's some nice name dropping, it reminded me much more strongly of Bloodsong, although not to the same quality as Ryan's fabulous book. Some inconsistencies of writing, worldbuilding, and characterization held it back from that lofty level. Then again, few books ever resonated with me as much as Bloodsong. Getting back to Rage of Dragons, when the sequel drops, it's going straight to the top of my TBR pile, which is all an author should really want: intensity for what's next.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#94
Two weeks? Took me about a year to read that series! 14 books plus a prequel and they probably average 800 pages a book. I know you just speed read a ton but a book a day for 14 days seems impossible.

On page 75 of the Farseer Trilogy, first book. It’s very well written although slow early on. I like it.
I mean, if its not a challenge, its not interesting... might want to wait for a week when I've got some holiday and the wife's working 60 hours and all that.

Or, you know, pick something more interesting to do as a reading thing :D
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#95
Anybody watch the "Great Reading Challenge" on PBS? I recorded it and have watched a little. It's interesting although many books featured are books I don't care about. I don't know how this series is going to continue but it would have been nice to have separate episodes where they solely featured sci-fi, fantasy, non-fiction, etc so it's not all blended together imo.
 

jo zebedee

Journeyed there and back again
#96
I'm reading two books by Jodi Taylor at the moment:

An Argumentation of Historians, the 9th book in the St Mary's Chronicles series .. which is just as great as previous instalments, so far.

White Silence, the 1st book in her Elizabeth Cage series, and this is superb. Only an hour and a half into the 9ish hour audiobook, and I'm a huge fan of the MC already.

I think she's becoming one of my favourite authors :)
I've wondered about her other series - presumably as good as St Mary's, then? There goes yet more of my hard-earned money. :D

I'm reading The Angel's Game by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. There are no words for how much I adore Zafon's writing - the sense of the place, the dark spooky corners, they're all stuff I try to nail in my own writing. And then I read his stuff and quietly weep. :D
 

Darth Tater

Journeyed there and back again
#97
Anybody watch the "Great Reading Challenge" on PBS? I recorded it and have watched a little. It's interesting although many books featured are books I don't care about. I don't know how this series is going to continue but it would have been nice to have separate episodes where they solely featured sci-fi, fantasy, non-fiction, etc so it's not all blended together imo.

That’s really interesting. Do you remember any fantasy (or sci fi and general fiction) books fearured offhand?
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
#98
Anybody watch the "Great Reading Challenge" on PBS? I recorded it and have watched a little. It's interesting although many books featured are books I don't care about. I don't know how this series is going to continue but it would have been nice to have separate episodes where they solely featured sci-fi, fantasy, non-fiction, etc so it's not all blended together imo.
I don't get pbs, we get a branch off called lpb . they remove a lot of national programs and put on a bunch on louisiana culture.

I checked that tv show isn't available to me
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#99
That’s really interesting. Do you remember any fantasy (or sci fi and general fiction) books fearured offhand?
They have gone over many books from Tom Sawyer to Gone with the Wind to Charlotte's Web to Hunger Games and Twilight. They are all over the map on everything which is why I'd like a more focused episodic treatment. They interview celebrities and ask them about their favourite books. They briefly mentioned a Wheel of Time's first book but it was so glossed over I was a bit annoyed lol. They did mention LOTR and they interviewed George Martin about that. Of course they did talk about Game of Thrones. I can't remember much else for the first episode (which I haven't even finished yet - it was 2 hours).

Edit - I do remember Orson Wells and 1984 being talked about. Possibly a mention of Dune but that I'm not sure of.
 

Ryan W. Mueller

Journeyed there and back again
Okay. I have bitched about Feist continuity errors.

But in A Crown Imperiled, he has a character visit an island and meet a new race... then later in the book, when its reported to him, its treated like he never ever met that new race and goes and meets them afresh.

That's the single biggest continuity error I've ever seen in a book. Unbelievable and probably a clear sign that he wasn't working with an editor at that point.
That makes me feel much better about the continuity errors I find when editing my own books. They're never quite that bad, and usually I can fix them in a few minutes.