It's September 2021: What fantasy book are you reading?

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#1
I'm currently on a re-read of the Post-Apocalyptic novel Earth Abides. It's really one of the best written PA novels I've ever read and strangely relevant (humanity is hit by a deadly pandemic that kills 99% of the world population).

I'm waiting for the final Abercrombie novel to be released. I've pre-ordered it and it should land on my door mat within a week or 2.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#3
I'm down to 2-1/2 Deverry books. I haven't become tired of them and will be sad when I'm done. I took a break last week to read Miles Cameron's newest, a sci-fi novel called Artifact Space. It was great and it's the first in a new trilogy. This is sort of right up his alley since he was a naval intelligence officer for 20 years. The only difference is substituting space for ocean. It's space warfare and discovery, a military space opera I guess you would call it. Sort of the far future but not that far actually. The main location is a nine kilometer long greatship, with about 9000 people on board. They trade across the galaxy in gold and other metals that are needed by the friendly aliens who make xenoglas, the most treasured substance by all spacefaring species. Wars with other hostile species are being waged over it. As you would expect of Miles Cameron, the characterizations are great and the technology is believable. I highly recommend this book. Four out of four railgun slugs.
 

Jakyro

Journeyed there and back again
#5
I'm still reading the Broken Empire series. I finished King of Thorns about a week ago. I liked it better than the first book: Prince Of Thorns. Not that it was a huge improvement, I gave both 3 stars, but I enjoyed it more. There was more happening in the story. I've already started reading the final book "Emperor of Thorns" and I'm making good progress. For now I'm liking it as much as KoT.

This series is also my first time reading Mark Lawrence. My general impression so far is decent, but I can't say I'm blown away by it. I'll probably give Lawrence another shot, but he's not on my priority list (yet). Maybe this can still change with the ending in book three
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#7
I've always thought that he suffers because of the natural comparison to Joe Abercrombie. Look how we are awaiting Abercrombie's The Wisdom of Crowds (only seven days and forty-one minutes!). I think the only Lawrence work that created such expectation in readers was volumes two and three of the Thorns trilogy, which I still consider my favorite work of his.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#8
I'm down to 2-1/2 Deverry books. I haven't become tired of them and will be sad when I'm done. I took a break last week to read Miles Cameron's newest, a sci-fi novel called Artifact Space. It was great and it's the first in a new trilogy. This is sort of right up his alley since he was a naval intelligence officer for 20 years. The only difference is substituting space for ocean. It's space warfare and discovery, a military space opera I guess you would call it. Sort of the far future but not that far actually. The main location is a nine kilometer long greatship, with about 9000 people on board. They trade across the galaxy in gold and other metals that are needed by the friendly aliens who make xenoglas, the most treasured substance by all spacefaring species. Wars with other hostile species are being waged over it. As you would expect of Miles Cameron, the characterizations are great and the technology is believable. I highly recommend this book. Four out of four railgun slugs.
I just bought Artifact Space based on this recommendation. Sounds like an interesting premise. I like Cameron's writing style as well. And of course I'm a big fan of The Expanse (James Corry), so you mentioning railgun slugs sealed the deal :)

I finished Earth Abides yesterday. What an awesome, melancholic book. Every bit as good as I remember it.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#10
I just bought Artifact Space based on this recommendation. Sounds like an interesting premise. I like Cameron's writing style as well. And of course I'm a big fan of The Expanse (James Corry), so you mentioning railgun slugs sealed the deal :)

I finished Earth Abides yesterday. What an awesome, melancholic book. Every bit as good as I remember it.
And speaking of The Expanse, November 16 can't come fast enough. And I'm pleased to see that Leviathan Falls is over six hundred pages.
 

GreyMouser

Journeyed there and back again
#11
I just read The Silmarillion for the 2nd time after more than 20 years. It is a tough read, but so worth it. By far the most epic book I've read.

It seems to me that the stories of Beren and Luthien, Hurin, Turin, and the over all history of the Valar and Eldar, would make great material for several TV series or movies. There is just so much material that a creative mind could flesh out.
 

Mohammed Al Mulla

Owns a Ring of Power
#13
I am at Book 5 of Conn Iggulden Conqueror series, Living the world of Mongols and their conquests. The series takes sever turns in events whether while going through Genghis Khan era or the time after him, reading through the rise and collapse of a nation that many miss understood for being barbaric and savage.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#14
So I took my own advice and left off of Deverry to begin reading Snuff by Sir Terry Pratchet and it is most definitely his work. There have been rumors that it was written by a ghost writer but about 50 pages in I have no doubt that he wrote this.

Edit: so in a fit of Discworld nostalgia I just purchased the last Discworld novel, the 41st, The Shepherd's Crown. It's the fifth in the Tiffany Aching series which is wonderful. Hopefully The Wee Free Men aka The Nac Mac Feegle make another appearance in a Tiffany Aching story. I can't stop guffawing as I read Snuff. This happened to me when we were at the Atlantis on vacation and everyone around the pool kept looking at me wondering, nothing is THAT funny. It was Guards! Guards! and yes all his writing is that funny.
 
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Cyphon

Journeyed there and back again
#15
I just finished up The Desert Prince by Peter V. Brett which is his new series from The Demon Cycle world. My thoughts on this one are a little bit complicated. I am a big fan of the original series and this one was very much a direct continuation of that. It's a small time skip ahead and we are following the children of the main characters from the last series with the same magic system and enemies in place. So for me having enjoyed the original series it was nice to fall right back into something I knew I would like.

Where the problem came into play was with the characters themselves. This one definitely trended toward the YA side of fantasy and the shortest way to put it would be that it was a little too much teen angst for me. I don't feel like going too deep down the rabbit hole but the cynic in me just couldn't help feeling like this book was as much about virtue signaling at times as it was about writing a good story with interesting characters. So while I still enjoyed the read it was nagging at me throughout and started to cheapen the experience some. Even with that I said to myself, just give the guy the benefit of the doubt because you have enjoyed his work. Then I read the acknowledgements and see where he thanks his sensitivity reader. So now I am asking myself did we really get the book he would have wanted to write or did we get a version he thought would win him brownie points from certain groups of people? Again, maybe I am just too cynical with this type of stuff and one of you could talk me off the ledge so to speak, but it bothers me.

All that said I still liked it and will most likely read the next one.