June 2015 - What fantasy books were we reading?

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#61
I decided to start Malice by John Gwynne. I picked it up during one of those Amazon specials. I don't have any money in my bank account right now so I am going to work my way through some of the many forgotten books on my Kindle.
 

GreyMouser

Journeyed there and back again
#62
I decided to start Malice by John Gwynne. I picked it up during one of those Amazon specials. I don't have any money in my bank account right now so I am going to work my way through some of the many forgotten books on my Kindle.
I have that one on kindle too. I'm looking foreword to reading your thoughts on it.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#63
I have that one on kindle too. I'm looking foreword to reading your thoughts on it.
I am thinking, at about 10% in, that it may end up being predictable. But I don't hate it. And a lot of times, the last part of a book can really turn things around for me.

In the meantime, I am getting thrown off by conversations where multiple phrases from the same conversation -- between two people -- make up a single paragraph. I'd much prefer each new line of dialogue to occupy its own line of text, as is standard. But I think I will be able to move past that (though my preference won't change).
 

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
#65
In the meantime, I am getting thrown off by conversations where multiple phrases from the same conversation -- between two people -- make up a single paragraph. I'd much prefer each new line of dialogue to occupy its own line of text, as is standard. But I think I will be able to move past that (though my preference won't change).
I hate that. I was reading some book, can't remember which but it really bothers me for some reason.
 
#66
I have just finished the Divergent Trilogy. Although the movie compelled me to find the book and read it yet I was not satisfied with the books. I think movie was way cooler than books. Tris's character was a little too selfish for my taste. Tobias too was a little too depressed from his life. The concept of genes mutation was good. The three books connect very deeply. An incident that we may think have ended in first book can be reveal many more secrets in the second and third book. But still it was worth reading even after it's character's weaknesses.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#67
I hate that. I was reading some book, can't remember which but it really bothers me for some reason.
Perhaps because it's hard to tell there are two people having a conversation. It reads more like one person talking to him/herself. And it is difficult to tell who said what. (At least, that's what bothers me.)
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#69
Finished Dune. Now I need to FINALLY finish The Grace of Kings. Good lord, I've been reading (not reading) that book forever. Below is my Dune review.

Dune is divided into three sections. Book 1 is Dune. Book 2 is Muad'dib. And book 3 is The Prophet.
Book 1 for me was the best thing about this book. Full of court intrigue, interesting characters and POVs, it was like Game of Thrones in space. This was a delight to read (or in my case listen to). Writing style here is amazing! It was on it's way of being a 5 star read. But unfortunately, book 2 and 3 were a bit of a letdown for me.
Nothing happens in book 2! You have some 14 chapters where 2 characters are roaming around the desert until they find some desert people in the last chapter. That's it. Book 3, the last part of book is slightly better, but the events that mean anything all happen in the last chapter.

In a way Dune is kind of a coming of age story, but it's also wider in themes than that. The writing is top notch, except for one part that kinda bothered me. I thought it was lazy writing in how author just adopted some Arabic words like Jihad (holy war), Shayṭan (Devil), Hajj (pilgrimage), Ulema (religious leaders) or even a german word Spannungsbogen to create a culture of Fremen (desert people). I grew up hearing these terms and for me they aren't mysterious, they are common to my ear as my own language (Bosnian). I don't imagine some race of people on a distant planet when I hear this, I imagine Arabs.
For example he says something like: I made a Shaytan's deal. That just sounds silly to me. It's not more effective than: I made a deal with the Devil. I even think the later one carries more punch when reading a book from an anglophone author.
Then there's concubines and polygamy and that reminded me of Demon Cycle by Peter V. Brett, so better not go there at all.

Fremen are in all that matters Arabs. And that's just lazy writing imo.

I know the novel has bigger themes, and that Frank Herbert wanted to illustrate West's dependence on oil, so spice is the oil, Fremen are Arabs, and Emperor and the Houses are the West, but the way he went about it was kinda lazy writing. I didn't care for that part of the book at all. What I cared about was the characters where he obviously devoted more time and care in chiseling them out, than making a political statement.

TLDR;
It started amazing, then went downhill. 3.5 stars rounded to 4. For a 4 star book, I'm let down and disappointed. I had a vision of a masterpiece when I started reading it. (Book 1)

Forgot to add, I know Dune is supposed to be SF, but honestly it's more a fantasy book IMO.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#70
Finished Dune. Now I need to FINALLY finish The Grace of Kings. Good lord, I've been reading (not reading) that book forever. Below is my Dune review.

Dune is divided into three sections. Book 1 is Dune. Book 2 is Muad'dib. And book 3 is The Prophet.
Book 1 for me was the best thing about this book. Full of court intrigue, interesting characters and POVs, it was like Game of Thrones in space. This was a delight to read (or in my case listen to). Writing style here is amazing! It was on it's way of being a 5 star read. But unfortunately, book 2 and 3 were a bit of a letdown for me.
Nothing happens in book 2! You have some 14 chapters where 2 characters are roaming around the desert until they find some desert people in the last chapter. That's it. Book 3, the last part of book is slightly better, but the events that mean anything all happen in the last chapter.

In a way Dune is kind of a coming of age story, but it's also wider in themes than that. The writing is top notch, except for one part that kinda bothered me. I thought it was lazy writing in how author just adopted some Arabic words like Jihad (holy war), Shayṭan (Devil), Hajj (pilgrimage), Ulema (religious leaders) or even a german word Spannungsbogen to create a culture of Fremen (desert people). I grew up hearing these terms and for me they aren't mysterious, they are common to my ear as my own language (Bosnian). I don't imagine some race of people on a distant planet when I hear this, I imagine Arabs.
For example he says something like: I made a Shaytan's deal. That just sounds silly to me. It's not more effective than: I made a deal with the Devil. I even think the later one carries more punch when reading a book from an anglophone author.
Then there's concubines and polygamy and that reminded me of Demon Cycle by Peter V. Brett, so better not go there at all.

Fremen are in all that matters Arabs. And that's just lazy writing imo.

I know the novel has bigger themes, and that Frank Herbert wanted to illustrate West's dependence on oil, so spice is the oil, Fremen are Arabs, and Emperor and the Houses are the West, but the way he went about it was kinda lazy writing. I didn't care for that part of the book at all. What I cared about was the characters where he obviously devoted more time and care in chiseling them out, than making a political statement.

TLDR;
It started amazing, then went downhill. 3.5 stars rounded to 4. For a 4 star book, I'm let down and disappointed. I had a vision of a masterpiece when I started reading it. (Book 1)

Forgot to add, I know Dune is supposed to be SF, but honestly it's more a fantasy book IMO.
Nice review. I agree on your opinion about the Fremen. If Herbert had handled it a bit more covertly, it might have been okay, but now he used direct words from Arabic, which is a bit lazy.

I've got some advice for you Alucard: never, ever, ever read the other Dune novels (written by Herbert's son mostly). They are absolutely horrible.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#71
If Herbert had handled it a bit more covertly, it might have been okay, but now he used direct words from Arabic, which is a bit lazy.
He used so much it is mindblowing. I found this site with a table of words with meaning.
I've got some advice for you Alucard: never, ever, ever read the other Dune novels (written by Herbert's son mostly). They are absolutely horrible.
I heard about that. I'm in no hurry to go back to Dune universe, but someday I might and I did a bit of search on that. Frank died in '86, and original series (6 books) were published by '85 and were written by him.

  1. Dune: Serial publication: Analog, December 1963 – February 1964 (Part I, as "Dune World"), and January – May 1965 (Parts II and III, as "The Prophet of Dune"). First edition: Philadelphia: Chilton Books, 1965.
  2. Dune Messiah: Serial publication: Galaxy, July – November 1969. First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969.
  3. Children of Dune: Serial publication: Analog, January – April 1976, "Children of Dune". First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1976.
  4. God Emperor of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1981.
  5. Heretics of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1984.
  6. Chapterhouse: Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1985.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Herbert_bibliography


Wouldn't you say these ones are 'safe' ? Have you read any of these?
 

Danica

Queen of the boards!
Staff member
#72
How did you find SoD compared to The Last Wish?
I personally liked it more but I would love to hear your opinion.
I liked it more too. I think it was more light hearted. I also think the author had a better sense of the characters because he was able to use the short stories to drive characterisation in a way he wasn't in the first book of short stories.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#73
I think it was more light hearted.
I didn't see it that way. After all,
Horrible things happen to Ciri in this book

I also think the author had a better sense of the characters because he was able to use the short stories to drive characterisation in a way he wasn't in the first book of short stories.
100% agree. I think that's why I liked it more as well. He managed to really get good character development on both Geralt and Yennfer. Dandelion...eh not so much. He kinda does his own thing through the books. I really love his character but he's kind of a dolt if I'm really honest with myself lol
 

Danica

Queen of the boards!
Staff member
#74
I didn't see it that way. After all,
Horrible things happen to Ciri in this book
Ahh i think you might be right. I am into Blod of Elves, so I think i might have said that, based on my new understanding. I do remember thinking Geralt had more or a sense of humor in SoD though
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#75
I do remember thinking Geralt had more or a sense of humor in SoD though
I think you are right there. Geralt's mood goes progressively darker as books go on. For a good reason though. These are dark books ahead.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#76
He used so much it is mindblowing. I found this site with a table of words with meaning.

I heard about that. I'm in no hurry to go back to Dune universe, but someday I might and I did a bit of search on that. Frank died in '86, and original series (6 books) were published by '85 and were written by him.

  1. Dune: Serial publication: Analog, December 1963 – February 1964 (Part I, as "Dune World"), and January – May 1965 (Parts II and III, as "The Prophet of Dune"). First edition: Philadelphia: Chilton Books, 1965.
  2. Dune Messiah: Serial publication: Galaxy, July – November 1969. First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969.
  3. Children of Dune: Serial publication: Analog, January – April 1976, "Children of Dune". First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1976.
  4. God Emperor of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1981.
  5. Heretics of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1984.
  6. Chapterhouse: Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1985.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Herbert_bibliography


Wouldn't you say these ones are 'safe' ? Have you read any of these?
I read book 4. Didn't like it. I haven't read book 5 (as to be honest, I thought they were written by his son).
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#77
  1. Dune: Serial publication: Analog, December 1963 – February 1964 (Part I, as "Dune World"), and January – May 1965 (Parts II and III, as "The Prophet of Dune"). First edition: Philadelphia: Chilton Books, 1965.
  2. Dune Messiah: Serial publication: Galaxy, July – November 1969. First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969.
  3. Children of Dune: Serial publication: Analog, January – April 1976, "Children of Dune". First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1976.
  4. God Emperor of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1981.
  5. Heretics of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1984.
  6. Chapterhouse: Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1985.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Herbert_bibliography


Wouldn't you say these ones are 'safe' ? Have you read any of these?
I read the first three (at least - it might have been more then that) as a teenager and liked them but it was so long ago that I'm not sure if I'd recommend any of the sequels - my tastes may have changed. It's safe to say that looking back at the books, the only one which really stuck in my mind was the first.
 

mizztara71

Mixes poisons and sharpens knives with Kylar
#78
I'm finishing up The Heresy Within by Rob J. Hayes (Book #1 in The Ties That Bind series) It started out iffy for me, but now I love it and will get the rest of the series.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#79
Just read prologue of A Dance of Cloaks. Wow. I have a feeling this is going to be a fun ride!
Hi Petyr, and welcome. David Daglish doesn't get much ink around here, so maybe you can keep us posted on the book and give us your impressions.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#80
I'm finishing up The Heresy Within by Rob J. Hayes (Book #1 in The Ties That Bind series) It started out iffy for me, but now I love it and will get the rest of the series.
Hi mizztara. Just looked to see what it was about and Amazon told me I had bought it last December, which was a surprise to me. Glad to hear it's so good. I've sent it to my Kindle so I won't forget this time.