Let's face it: GRRM is never going to finish aSoIaF

George Martin is never going to finish aSoIaF

  • Agree

    Votes: 14 77.8%
  • Disagree

    Votes: 3 16.7%
  • I honestly thought he died years ago

    Votes: 1 5.6%

  • Total voters
    18

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#81
I didn't know the mainstream YA-fantasy audience consists for 80% out of women. I had expected it to be the other way around. I guess it depends on how YA is defined though (if it includes Twilight, The Maze Runner, the Hunger Games etc then I can understand the 80%).
It is far from the first time I've heard that boys don't read YA - hell, getting boys to read full stop is considered quite a difficulty - although I think this is the first time I've heard a number.

But yes, between boys reading less than girls, and boys being more likely to read what is considered adult material, girls are the major demographic even for fantasy YA insofar as I'm aware.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#82
The practice has shown that the most reliable publishing dates are the ones who've been widely known for a while - like a year. So unless you hear that a book is being published in 2017 by March, you can more or less forget about it being published in 2017 altogether.

So yeah - Doors of Stone and Winds of Winter aren't coming anytime soon. Even if the books were finished as of today, publisher would still need time slotting, promoting and publishing the thing.

EDIT: The 80% women in YA represents the whole of the genre - of course things like Red Rising by Pierce Brown would probably have a different percentage, being more trad fantasy/sci-fi fandom friendly, but on a whole as far as I am aware its 80% women. The number comes from Brandon Sanderson's lectures, and a few other YA authors mentioning it in passing. And when you go to YA-centric BookTube channels like PerruseProject or Abooktopia - the trend gets pretty obvious. :) I won't bet real money on 80% being the exact percentage, but it's probably close enough to be of use.
 
Last edited:

Davis Ashura

Mixes poisons and sharpens knives with Kylar
#83
EDIT: The 80% women in YA represents the whole of the genre - of course things like Red Rising by Pierce Brown would probably have a different percentage, being more trad fantasy/sci-fi fandom friendly, but on a whole as far as I am aware its 80% women. The number comes from Brandon Sanderson's lectures, and a few other YA authors mentioning it in passing. And when you go to YA-centric BookTube channels like PerruseProject or Abooktopia - the trend gets pretty obvious. :) I won't bet real money on 80% being the exact percentage, but it's probably close enough to be of use.
I'd say that's about right or even a little low. My local Barnes and Noble has a separate section for what's titled Teen Sci-Fi/Fantasy adventure. I've done quick number counts wherein I count out the number of women and men authoring books. If there are multiple books in a series, I only include the first book in my denominator. I go until I get a count/denominator of fifty, and without fail for the past three years, a good 80-90% of the authors are women and their stories almost always are about young women. For whatever reason, boys apparently don't like reading stories about girls.
 

ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#84
For whatever reason, boys apparently don't like reading stories about girls.
I'd say it's more like - boys don't like to read about imaginary feminine drama. Even many of the women reading YA get peeved by the over-use of pet peeves such as love triangles, instalove, Mary Sue, very beautiful but awfully insecure female lead, etc. Search top 10 YA pet peeves - it's usually women that complain, but I guess boys just close the books and move on. It's not that the pet peeves listed above, and all other YA tropes, couldn't happen in real life, but being a capable of reproduction human being isn't even a 1/10 as complicated state as those books portray it, so I guess that's one of the things that keeps many readers away - the cheap "let's add some drama" tricks.

I read YA from time to time, as an aspiring author trying to keep up with the trends, and I'd often say to myself "Okay, this story is decent, damn, it's actually awesome!" and 50 pages in the love cliches start to rain and all that great character or world-building is for naught.

But it's different demographics, really, I don't like such kind of stories, but many people do and those women writers create their works for them, not me, so I try to remind myself that I like stories with dragons, and if I can suspend my disbelief to allow dragons, I suppose other might be willing to suspend theirs to allow love-triangles and such. To each his own. :)
 
Last edited:

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#85
I haven't connected that name with JP somehow. I even have JP on my tbr list and I watched the movies as a kid.

That's interesting.
Which part of the world did you say you live in? Are there particular genres that tend to be more popular there, like SFF? Or maybe local/regional authors have a stronger presence?
I'm from Bosnia & Herzegovina. 3.5 million people. So tiny. But I haven't been living there for the past 6 years, so what I know might be dated.
I think domestic authors (and when I say domestic I also mean Croatian, Serbian & Montenegrin because there's no need for translation) are the most popular. As for the genre these authors write in, I think calling it contemporary or modern would be a safe bet. It's more on literary side than it is on speculative fiction/romance/drama or any other genre.

Have you heard of any of these films Alucard? They're based on Grisham novels. It's mostly juridical dramas.
View attachment 899
Yeah almost all of them. I even watched Runaway Jury. Probably because there's John Cusack in it, but right now I can't remember anything about it.


But I think me not knowing these names has to do more with what I read. I like and read speculative fiction (Fantasy, SF, Horror) and classic literature, so I'm not really surprised when I don't know major authors from thriller, crime or romance subgenre. I'm just not their target audience.