Long Series Recommendation

moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
#41
Wow, thanks l3gacy! I had no idea Riftwar was that long. Looks like I've got about a year of reading added
Don't get excited yet dude. It's a very controversial series. I read magician and magician's master and I thought both books were terrible. I hear that the Empire Trilogy might be worth it but after that I've heard Feist's book get really, really awful, even worse than the original series which to me seems pretty bad. His novels are also very simple without any substantive themes to them.
 

Annomander Matt

Drinks Elfbark tea with FitzChivalry
#42
Don't get excited yet dude. It's a very controversial series. I read magician and magician's master and I thought both books were terrible. I hear that the Empire Trilogy might be worth it but after that I've heard Feist's book get really, really awful, even worse than the original series which to me seems pretty bad. His novels are also very simple without any substantive themes to them.
Hmm... Probably why I've been stuck trying to find a new long series to read. Hard to get a consensus lol
 

deuslachesis

Told lies with Locke
#43
The Saga of Recluse- L.E. Modesitt Jr. is another long series, I think something like 18 books. He also has a few other series, such as
The Imager Portfolio- 9 books
The Corean Chronicles- 8 books

Which really only scratches the surface on all the other books/series he has written. He is quite prolific.

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ExTended

Journeyed there and back again
#44
I wanted to say Riyria Revelations and Chronicles, but you already got it on the 'done' list. Then I thought about Raymond E. Feist... but, ehm... the quality of his books vary and the over-all quality isn't that impressive. The first 6 books are nice, some of the stand alones are nice too, then you have The Serpentwar Saga which at least features 4 slightly different themed books, which is quite an accomplishment for this particular writer. And the Conclave of Shadows trilogy is nice too. However, most likely you won't be that impressed by this particular recommendation.

If you are ok with trilogies - you could try The Night Angel trilogy. It's not the best thing out there, but it is entertaining in its own way. I felt the 3rd book was a bit rushed, but hey - better to leave early than staying too long. :p :D

And you could always go for The Lord of the Rings trilogy. You will feel like entering into a magical world created over 50 years ago, but in a good way. Which could be refreshing, considering how a lot of books cannot really pull off a noticeable world-building or nature description. It's a little bit slow at times, but in my opinion it's worth the time.

There is also one little known series called Queen`s Thief by Meghan Whalen Turner( not sure I've spelled the name right) which is 4 books long and 5th book is supposedly on the way, but the 4th book doesn't end in with that big of a cliffhanger and I am almost sure the author has either abandoned the series or is working slower than G. R. R. Martin. It's thief-themed series, all 4 of the books are somewhat different from one-another as a tone, even though they follow a linear story progression. It won't rock your world, but it's a solid light read for between heavier series.

And another trilogy - The Magicians by Lev Grossman, which is pretty fresh, and interesting and well-written, and there is even a new TV show about it, but I would recommend you to read to books first, before giving a chance to the show.

I wish I could've been of more help to you, but most of the series I have read recently are half-way or almost finished, so there is only as much as I can say on the matter of fully finished series.

And there is one trilogy I am not sure I want to recommend you. I am not sure about the trilogy name, but the first book is called The Blood Song and the author is Anthony Ryan. The thing is - the first book is great, it's 10/10 great. But the 2nd and 3rd book are having a steady journey southward. I wouldn't say the trilogy is that bad, it's probably 7/10 or 7.5/10 over-all.The biggest problem with it is that it could've been much better, should've been much better, actually. If you are interested you could search around the forum for it, there are some threads about it I think and you will get a better idea what the general opinion is when it comes to those three books.

And I am pretty early in my Terry Pratchett journey, started it recently and I am on my 3rd book of his vast collection of 41 books. I know that most people enjoy it immensely and it's more or less finished, even thought it's more few series happening at the same time in the same city or something. As I've said - I am on my 3rd book, so you should probably ask someone who has more experience with the Diskword. So yeah, that's an option as well, I guess. :)
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#45
And then there are some Trudi Canavan's work which fit your criteria. But I dunno whether you will like it or not.
I read her "Black Magician" and did find it quite nice! (Although a bit YA-ish).

I'm doing the same. The Wax n Wayne books individually aren't doing it for me.
I found that quite nice! I mean, allomancy and six-shooters, what's not to like about that?

What about Dark Tower. I'm about to start book 8.
Oh. Don't read my spoiler then.

So, I read the whole series - actually I waited for a few years until the final book, and really liked it ... until the end. Then I did not like it any more :mad:

When I read the end, I felt cheated. What a way to end the series? Horrible IMO!

I'm not saying anything more. Don't want to spoil it. Just want to give an ominous comment.
Those who have read the complete series likely know what I am talking about.

My suggestions, actually all from the "Urban Fantasy" genre:
- Dresden Files
- Rivers of London series
- Alex Verus series
- Night Watch series

All of those are not yet "finished", but can be read so far without any problems IMO.
 
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Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#46
All of those are not yet "finished", but can be read so far without any problems IMO.
Night Watch is finished.
Now if you mean English translation is not finished, the last book is due in august this year.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26242370-sixth-watch
German translation is already out (last year) as well as some other languages.

The Saga of Recluse- L.E. Modesitt Jr. is another long series, I think something like 18 books. He also has a few other series, such as
I think it was Sneaky who remarked at one point that Modesitt is basically writing the same book over and over.
After that observation I've been reluctant to try it.

@Annomander Matt
If you like S&S I would suggest Witcher series. It's 7 books in total. For more info on reading order and such go here: http://bestfantasybooks.com/forums/threads/the-witcher-books.1650/

Official translations of books 7 & 8 are due in May this year and May 2017, but the fan translations are really good as well.
 
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Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#47
Night Watch is finished.
Now if you mean English translation is not finished, the last book is due in august this year.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26242370-sixth-watch
German translation is already out (last year) as well as some other languages.


I think it was Sneaky who remarked at one point that Modesitt is basically writing the same book over and over.
After that observation I've been reluctant to try it.

@Annomander Matt
If you like S&S I would suggest Witcher series. It's 7 books in total. For more info on reading order and such go here: http://bestfantasybooks.com/forums/threads/the-witcher-books.1650/

Official translations of books 7 & 8 are due in May this year and May 2017, but the fan translations are really good as well.
This post shows some nice exceptions to the rule we established in the 'Fantasy - an Anglo-Saxon preserve'-thread, Alucard.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#49
Sorry I forgot, what rule did we establish?
Not a real rule as such, but you mentioned that non Anglo-Saxon books have a hard time competing on English markets due to the translation problem, and due to the fact that big publishers are more likely to catch up on books written in the native language.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#50
Not a real rule as such, but you mentioned that non Anglo-Saxon books have a hard time competing on English markets due to the translation problem, and due to the fact that big publishers are more likely to catch up on books written in the native language.
Well that observation still stands, and it doesn't change the fact that only 4% of all fiction in US and UK are translated works.

But sure, congrats to Sapkowski and Lukyanenko for "making into 4%".
You know the sad truth is they never would "make it", if it wasn't for Witcher PC game in Sapkowski's case and Night Watch movie which had some relative success in Lukyanenko's case.
It wasn't the genuine interest in their books or recognition that these are damn good books, or god forbid an interest in to Polish and Russian fantasy, but the insight that translating this could result in $$$ by pandering to already established gaming fan base or people who have watched the movie.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#51
Well that observation still stands, and it doesn't change the fact that only 4% of all fiction in US and UK are translated works.

But sure, congrats to Sapkowski and Lukyanenko for "making into 4%".
You know the sad truth is they never would "make it", if it wasn't for Witcher PC game in Sapkowski's case and Night Watch movie which had some relative success in Lukyanenko's case.
It wasn't the genuine interest in their books or recognition that these are damn good books, or god forbid an interest in to Polish and Russian fantasy, but the insight that translating this could result in $$$ by pandering to already established gaming fan base or people who have watched the movie.
Oh definitely. This is the exception that proves the rule. Still, it's nice to see some foreign authors "making it".
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#52
Still, it's nice to see some foreign authors "making it".
Sure. I'm disappointed though that the interest for them comes from and is generated from other entertainment industries like movie and game. And it's only when publishing houses perceive that they can make money of them, they are willing to give them a chance.
I would love it if those chances came based on the merit of how good these books are, but it seems like the movie and game industries are better risk takers than publishing companies are.
I suppose that publishing companies in UK and US aren't really full of people who speak multiple languages either and who would be able to uncover hidden gems of european fantasy to anglo-saxon audience.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#53
How about Dave Duncans "A Man of his Word" and "A Handful of Men"?
Twice 4 Books. Coming of Age, likeable Characters, an interesting magic system...
I really liked the series, though Duncan doesn't seem to get much credit here.
I agree and I think it's just that not many here have read him. He's probably "the best author you've never heard of". Man of His Word is on the best of lists here, not sure where. These two tetralogies and the King's Blades books are my favorites. I find it interesting that Seventh Sword is the most well known of his works but inferior in my opinion to most of his other books.

So yes WestOfJanuary, I join you in recommending these great epic fantasies.
 

Annomander Matt

Drinks Elfbark tea with FitzChivalry
#54
I agree and I think it's just that not many here have read him. He's probably "the best author you've never heard of". Man of His Word is on the best of lists here, not sure where. These two tetralogies and the King's Blades books are my favorites. I find it interesting that Seventh Sword is the most well known of his works but inferior in my opinion to most of his other books.

So yes WestOfJanuary, I join you in recommending these great epic fantasies.
Added A Man of His Word to my Goodreads TBR :)

Lots of great suggestions here. And I should have probably mentioned I love trilogies, and have read most of those mentioned here. I just wanted to get a long series discussion going since I'd been feeling a little nostalgic for the likes of Malazan and WOT lately (my first 3 fantasy series I read were ASOIF, Malazan, and WOT in that order. I started my fantasy reading career with a bang lol. Probably cuz I'd been a Clive Cussler fan and read 20 or more of his Dirk Pitt books). That nostalgia was why I chose Codex Alera and Godling Chronicles recently (6 books each, although short books), and I really enjoyed them both.

Re: The Witcher, I've got 5 on my shelf and pre-ordered the 6th. Goal is to start it early 2017 to coincide nicely with the 7th book release :)
 

WestOfJanuary

Listens to The Unbeliever whine about life
#55
I, too, like these discussions to get a feel what is worth reading. I just stumbled
over this site some weeks ago and am really happy to find some good recommendations.

Your mentioned first series are the last I read so far. ASOIAF I really like but I
think I'm done with Martin... Malazan hat some fantastic moments but I couldn't finish
it, maybe I'll pick it up again some day.

Right now I'm in WoT and although I like the series I want to be done with it and move
on to Abercrombie or Sanderson, from whom I didn't read anything so far.
 

LexieS17

Fought a battle in the name of the old gods
#56
Holy shizznit, this thread is f*cking awesome! I LOVE trilogies and long series'. I have nothing against stand alone novels, I've read quite a few but I really love a multi-book story. I just love spending as much time with characters as I can (which is why I always cry when a series is over, cuz I don't to hang with those characters anymore).

I'd add some long series of my own but most of the multi-book series books I've read are YA as I'm just now getting into adult fantasy
but I'm gonna be drooling over this thread and adding books to my TBR for a long time. Thanks @annonmander!
 

Annomander Matt

Drinks Elfbark tea with FitzChivalry
#58
Nobody here has mentioned Rachel Aaron's Eli Monpress series. It's five books long, and while it's not the most sophisticated stuff out there, it's just plain fun to read.
I loved the Monpress series. Not the most complex story, but fun and fast paced with great characters. Like many of the under the radar series I've read (Cycle of Arawn, Godling Chronicles), it started with a cheap deal on the first book and then I was hooked.
 

deuslachesis

Told lies with Locke
#59
Not sure if this exactly counts, but Frank Herbert's "Dune" series definitely a winner. Its calls itself SciFi, but in reality its more of a sci-fantasy.
Also there is Gene Wolf's "Book of the New Sun" which is split in two omnibus's. However it will take several read through and a massive chunk of your time before you peel back all the layers.

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Mitchel Snel

A farm boy with a sword
#60
I would like to add my own may be recommendation. I have read via other threts that books of the new sun (4 books complete) is close to malazan? and of course please keep the books coming! I like to read long series too! for some reason I could get into wheel of time way of kings but not in sanderson's mistborn series.

and I agree completed fantasy series are the way to go!