Long Series Recommendation

deuslachesis

Told lies with Locke
#61
I would like to add my own may be recommendation. I have read via other threts that books of the new sun (4 books complete) is close to malazan? and of course please keep the books coming! I like to read long series too! for some reason I could get into wheel of time way of kings but not in sanderson's mistborn series.

and I agree completed fantasy series are the way to go!
I wouldn't say its close to malazan, I mean the plot and prose is exquisite and epic, but its lacking in the number of characters, overarching sub-plots, and just really the subject matter. However Wolfe does have a way of subtlety introducing complex philosophical POV much in the same way Erikson does his avid portrayal of individualistic point of views.

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Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#62
Don't know if anybody mentioned Shadows of the Apt
https://www.goodreads.com/series/45895-shadows-of-the-apt
but that is a 10 book series. Never read them myself so can't say how they are. Maybe somebody else can.

And of course since you like Malazan @Annomander Matt these two authors come to mind, Glen Cook and Paul Kearney
First Glen Cook
The Chronicles of the Black Company
https://www.goodreads.com/series/54284-the-chronicles-of-the-black-company
That's 9 books out, and #10 coming. Of course he has a series called Instrumentalities of the Night which is finished (4 books). I think Sneaky read and liked that one.
https://www.goodreads.com/series/53831-instrumentalities-of-the-night

Second Paul Kearney with The Monarchies of God (5 books)
https://www.goodreads.com/series/49870-the-monarchies-of-god

These are the writers that Erikson himself mentions as either influences or what he likes to read.

"In any case, I was and remain a fan of fantasy fiction -- one of the multitude whose buying habits are so vigorously analyzed -- and I buy a lot of books and a lot of it's trash and, dammit, I read it anyway. I'm insatiable when it comes to fantasy novels. And desperately searching for something worth sinking my time into. In other words, my buying habits don't accurately reflect my tastes, except in a most general sense (i.e., I buy fantasy novels) and even that's misleading -- I buy political thrillers, military adventures, historical, science fiction, international intrigue, mysteries, and contemporary fiction, too -- everything but romances.

And every one of those genres has contributed to my writing, to the creation of the fictional world of the Malazan Empire, some more than others -- when taking a writing degree at the University of Victoria I plunged into the novels of the Vietnam War written by veterans -- from Tim O'Brien to Gustav Hasford, I read them all. There's one influence (especially Hasford, with his laconic, brutal style and the sly, sardonic eye). I'd already devoured all the Ludlum and Tom Clancy novels (these guys can put together a complex plot), and Stephen King (seriously underrated as a writer, he is). Three more influences. Who else? John Gardner's Grendel, Don DeLillo's The Names. Ursula LeGuin -- ah, now we're moving into fantasy genre stuff. Okay. Stephen Donaldson's Covenant novels impressed me with their sheer risk-taking -- very complex characterization coupled with a latinate style that had me reaching for the dictionary. The first chapter to Lord Foul's Bane remains with me as a truly extraordinary piece of writing. Tim Powers, yeah, brilliant stuff. Glen Cook's Black Company novels, in which I see (or think I see) a certain Vietnam War literary influence. And, more recently, Paul Kearney -- his Monarchies of God is simply the best fantasy series I've read in years and years."

I like that he mentions Tim Powers. That guy is seriously underrated. And John Gardner's Grendel! I love that book so much.
More of the interview here: https://www.sfsite.com/06a/se82.htm
 

moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
#63
Steven Erikson is one of the few fantasy authors whose recommendations I actually take seriously. I read the Monarchy of Gods, the Black Company, and Tim Powers are earlier than I probably would have because of his recommendations and all of that stuff really is excellent. The Monarchy of Gods consists of five relatively short books but they are excellent and immensely underrated up until the last book which is terrible. Tim Powers mainly writes standalones but he's written a lot of them and his approach to writing is similar in some respects to Erikson so there's definitely enough there to keep the Malazan fan busy for a long time. Although imperfect his books are highly intellectual and brilliant as Erikson said. I've read only two of his books but that was enough to know that Powers hits the mark for me.
 

deuslachesis

Told lies with Locke
#64
+1 for Glenn Cook & Paul Kearney! Tbo tho Kearney's "The Macht" trilogy I enjoyed far more than "Monarchies of God". To be fair " The Macht" is purely a military fantasy, but it some of the best out there before one starts stepping into Turtledove and his ilk.

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Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#65
Tim Powers mainly writes standalones but he's written a lot of them and his approach to writing is similar in some respects to Erikson so there's definitely enough there to keep the Malazan fan busy for a long time. Although imperfect his books are highly intellectual and brilliant as Erikson said. I've read only two of his books but that was enough to know that Powers hits the mark for me.
He has a book that came out this Jan called Medusa's Web, and it's about old Hollywood of 1920s and the occult. I've read about his process few days ago actually and it's really interesting. He's kind of obsessive about things that spark his interest and out of those he spins an alternative fantastical version of a story that has a basis in history.
TIM POWERS: INTERVIEW WITH A SECRET HISTORIAN

Also you have to read Grendel. It's under 200 pages but the writing is brilliant. Disclaimer: being familiar with Beowulf epic poem is a must, if one is to enjoy John Gardner's book. Strangely enough Gardner wasn't a prolific writer. He's much better known as an academic.
 

Mitchel Snel

A farm boy with a sword
#66
hmm I have read about Mr. powers but did not read anything by him yet. I am currently reading a bit lighter stuff mainly the godling chronicles from the recommendation at the beginning of this thret. also because the narrator who reads the audiobooks is very highly rated. I listen to my books so that is important to me. I have seen Paul Kearney mentioned a lot in epic fantasy but sadly he is not available in audio yet.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#67
The Saga of Recluse- L.E. Modesitt Jr. is another long series, I think something like 18 books. He also has a few other series, such as
The Imager Portfolio- 9 books
The Corean Chronicles- 8 books
Which really only scratches the surface on all the other books/series he has written. He is quite prolific.
Because he writes the same story OVER and OVER and OVER again. (Seriously, I've read probably 12 or more of the Recluce books. It's like he was using a MadLibs book and switching magic colors and character names and homelands out.)
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#68
+1 for Glenn Cook & Paul Kearney! Tbo tho Kearney's "The Macht" trilogy I enjoyed far more than "Monarchies of God". To be fair " The Macht" is purely a military fantasy, but it some of the best out there before one starts stepping into Turtledove and his ilk.

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Yes, good recommendation there deuslachesis. I liked Macht much better. And for Glen Cook, I think his Dread Empire series (8 books) is better than Black Company.
 

ROBNOB9X

Killed in the battle against the Mad King
#70
Only seen it mentioned here once in this thread but shadows of the apt series by Adrian Tchaikovsky is brilliant. Can't remember how many in the series which just recently finished, 9 or 10 I think, probably 10 but it just gets better and better and the world seems to get bigger plus the characters develop hugely over the course of the series. Absolutely loved it, also again I have to mention Thomas Covenant Chronicles of the Unbeliever. This is what got me into fantasy when I started reading it when I was about 12ish I think. Genuinely fell in love with the land. Plus you'll learn a few new word on the way!

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Annomander Matt

Drinks Elfbark tea with FitzChivalry
#71
I would like to add my own may be recommendation. I have read via other threts that books of the new sun (4 books complete) is close to malazan? and of course please keep the books coming! I like to read long series too! for some reason I could get into wheel of time way of kings but not in sanderson's mistborn series.

and I agree completed fantasy series are the way to go!
I've added the books of the new sun to my list. It's really hard to compare things to Malazan I've found. Every once in a while I'll be reading a series and get this feeling in the back of my mind that something has tickled my "Malazan bone", but when I try to explain it I just can't. For instance, I felt like aspects of the Acts Of Caine were reminiscent, but when I tried to put it into wordsi found myself lacking. The prose, the complexity, the heart, the humor, the characters, the use of convergence, etc of Malazan is just unmatched IMO. I'll always be searching for something like it, but frankly, I've found that a series only needs to contain a sliver of what makes Malazan great in order for me to love it.
 

Sirl19

Mixes poisons and sharpens knives with Kylar
#72
Another series just came to my mind: Aquasilva, by Anselm Audley.

Original trilogy
1. Heresy
2. Inquisition
3. Crusade

Sequel
4. Vespera

I vaguely remember a world made of a few island in a vast ocean, where the religious and political power is based on some kind of fire magic. Magic of the other elements is chased and punished. The protagonist, some sort of prince of his house, finds himself in the middle of a battle against the empire when he discovers he has one of said forbidden magic.

I read the first book when I was a kid and found it a bit dense. But some years later I started over and finished the trilogy. I remember it has maybe too much politics for my taste, but I have a good memory of the series in general. I still believe the second time I was still too young.

I haven't read the 4th part yet, but I'm considering a re-read of the whole series to see how I like it now, few fore years and many books later.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#75
Tim Powers mainly writes standalones but he's written a lot of them and his approach to writing is similar in some respects to Erikson so there's definitely enough there to keep the Malazan fan busy for a long time. Although imperfect his books are highly intellectual and brilliant as Erikson said.
Hey so that's cool, I always despair of my not getting on with highly intellectual and brilliant authors, but I've read everything Powers has written except the new one. I think maybe because I started with Drawing of the Dark which was exciting and action packed so I didn't know it was intellectual or I would never have picked it up.

I highly recommend Drawing of the Dark or Anubis Gates as intros to Powers.