Post your own Top 25 Best Fantasy Books

Jon Snow

No Power in the Verse can stop me
Staff member
#41
Not in Order as that requires too much thought at the moment.

A Song of Ice and Fire - George R.R Martin
Dunk and Egg Stories - George R.R Martin
Fevre Dream - George R.R. Martin
Mistborn - Brandon Sanderson
Stormlight Archives - Brandon Sanderson
The First Law - Joe Abercrombie
The Heroes - Joe Abercrombie
Bartimaeus Trilogy - Jonathan Stroud
Tawny Man Trilogy - Robin Hobb
Farseer Trilogy - Robin Hobb
Dresden Files - Jim Butcher
The Gentlemen Bastards - Scott Lynch
Kingdom of Thorn and Bone - Greg Keyes
Neverwhere - Neil Gaiman
Powder Mage Trilogy - Brian McClellan
The Unhewn Throne - Brian Staveley
Troy Trilogy - David Gemmell
Legend - David Gemmell

There are many more thatn I like, but these are the top ones.
 

Fatal Rose

Killed a Balrog
#42
Not in Order as that requires too much thought at the moment.

A Song of Ice and Fire - George R.R Martin
Dunk and Egg Stories - George R.R Martin
Fevre Dream - George R.R. Martin
Mistborn - Brandon Sanderson
Stormlight Archives - Brandon Sanderson
The First Law - Joe Abercrombie
The Heroes - Joe Abercrombie
Bartimaeus Trilogy - Jonathan Stroud
Tawny Man Trilogy - Robin Hobb
Farseer Trilogy - Robin Hobb
Dresden Files - Jim Butcher
The Gentlemen Bastards - Scott Lynch
Kingdom of Thorn and Bone - Greg Keyes
Neverwhere - Neil Gaiman
Powder Mage Trilogy - Brian McClellan
The Unhewn Throne - Brian Staveley
Troy Trilogy - David Gemmell
Legend - David Gemmell

There are many more thatn I like, but these are the top ones.
We have a lot in common. I haven't read all of those but the ones I haven't I'm highly interested in.
Like Mistborn, Stormlight, Abercrombie, more stuff from Hobb, Gemmell.

Can't wait to read those.
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#44
Since this post is way too long I had to split it into 2 posts.

Thought it would be fun to post my own top 25 list. It turned out to a lot more work than I thought it would be and made me appreciate the main site a lot more.

A few notes before the list itself:
1. I went a little bit "political" in entries #1,2 and 25 and took into account the books' contribution to the genre (although #1 and 2 would certainly still be within the top 10).
2. On the other side hand, I was liberal in my interpretation of what fantasy is. A couple of books in my list could be considered sci-fi or horror, but since they included strong fantasy elements I went with them anyway.
3. Like Ben, I decided that I my list will include 25 different authors. In the end I broke this rule...but only once, and I still have 25 different authors in it as one of the books was co-written (nothing feels as good as tweaking your own rules :p).

Anyway, here it is:

1. A Song of Ice and Fire - George R.R Martin

If Tolkien is the grandaddy of the fantasy genre, then Martin is the father of modern fantasy as we know it within the last 20 years. Seriously, is there one fantasy reader on this planet who hasn't read the books or, at least, watched the TV series? It's true that the last two books, while still good books, are nowhere near the genius level of the beginning of the series, and that we're all tired of Martin posing for selfies with celebs and dying for him to take his thumb out of his ass and start writing already, but nothing can take from him the greatness of the first 2 books or the impact he had on the genre.

2. Lord of the Rings - J.R.R Tolkien

One book to start them all. One book to bind them to the genre. Fantasy existed way before Tolkien, but not as it is today - more like a sporadic cluster of books here and there. Tolkien success made it all started. The books may not be as gritty or realistic as is today's fashion, but they are still beautifully written and within a mere 1,000 pages contain more action and story then most modern fantasy series contain within 5,000 pages or more.

3. The Master and Margarita - Mikhail Bulgakov

A beautiful masterpiece which transcends genres. It's one of the books that not a lot of new fantasy readers heard about, and more's the pity. It's urban fantasy the likes of which you never read - not China Mieville, not Neil Gaiman and certainly not Jim Butcher. Mixed up within the book are historical fiction, political satire, a story of love, dark betrayals and merry demon pranks, all taking place in late 1920's Moscow. Simply put - this is not the best fantasy book you never read. This is the best book you never read.

4. Lord of Light - Roger Zelazny

To paraphrase Trainspotting: Take the best action book you ever read, multiply it by a thousand, and you'll still come nowhere near the level of Zelazny's greatest achievement. This is the most condensed non-stop action you'll ever read. Gods, mortals, Hindu and Buddhist mythology, epic duels, bloody wars, cities destroyed, eastern philosophy, assassinations, unnatural monsters, and the lot. All within 300 pages. Is there any more reason to describe the book any further? Why aren't you reading it right now?

5. Discworld - Terry Pratchett

Comedy fantasy which goes way beyond comedy or fantasy. When he first started out, Pratchett was described as Fantasy's answer to Douglas Adams. Later, when he reached his peak, it was said the "If Prtachett would have started writing 10 years earlier, Ford Prefect would have had to hung out his towel". Pratchett's books, beside being hilarious, also contain unforgettable characters, good plots, and a lot of humanity. Some of the earlier books are less developed but the middle books are a joy to read.

6. Malazan Book of the Fallen - Steven Erikson

This is one series that I wouldn't know how to begin describing. Everything and anything in fantasy you can think of is there. Bigger than life characters? Check. Epic story? Check. Humor? Check. An unbelievably long time span? Check. Battles? Check. 3.3 million words? Check...
Erikson's magnificent saga spans over 10 enormously large books. Earlier books can be confusing, but stick along for the ride and you will be rewarded. The series have been described as both epic and military, but what it really is is an experience.

7. First Law Trilogy and sequel standalones - Joe Abercrombie

So what happens when you take all of fantasy's conventions, turns them inside out, add witty writing and possible the best written characters you can think of? You get one of Abercrombie's books, that's what. There's absolutely no other writer who can make you root for a torturer or a mass murderer. There's absolutely no other writer who can make you love a character that you hated the guts of 10 pages earlier, and there's absolutely no similar experience to introducing yourself to Abercrombie's books for the first time.

8. First Amber Chronicles - Roger Zelazny.

This is the one entry where I ignored my decision to include 25 authors in this list. I simply could not create a top 25 fantasy list and leave this one behind. The most imaginative fantasy you can think of, combined with great characters, epic duels, battles, political intrigue, and an internal battle not between good and evil, but between two cosmic sides. The series is divided to two 5 books series. The first 5 are brilliant. The last 5, taking place several years afterwards and with a different protagonist, are still good, but nowhere near the level of the first 5.

9. Kingkiller Chronicles - Patrick Rothfuss

It took me a long time to bring myself to read these books. 2 books in almost 10 years with no idea when the next one will be published? A simple story of coming of age? I was extremely dubious. All that changed when I actually started to read the books. I don't even have the place to describe how beautiful the writing is, but trust me, it is. Calling the books a coming of age story is true in the same sense of calling Michael Jordan just another basketball player. Rothfuss made me rooting for the type of character I never thought I could stand.

10. Neverwhere - Neil Gaiman

Deciding which Gaiman book I wanted to exclude from the list, Neverwhere or American Gods, was not unlike to deciding which of your sons you want to sacrifice to the gods. In the end I choose Neverwher simply because it was the most fun to read of the bunch. It was Gaiman's debut book (notwithstanding Good Omens which was co-written with Terry Pratchett) and while it did not have the same depth as his later books, it was the most satisfying to read. Oh, and in case you haven't bought the argument, it has the best described pair of villains you can think of.
 
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ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#45
11. Farseer Trilogy - Robin Hobb

Hobb is the mistress of creating emotional scenes that rival the most intense battles. Seriously, is there anyone who read her books and did not feel for Fitz? Farseer is a simple, traditional, yet engrossing story, and you can't help but being part of it as you read it. If you've read those books and did not feel anything, you probably have a heart of stone and the soul of a custard pie. ;)

12. Long Price Quartet - Daniel Abraham

A fantasy series which emphasizes characters and relationships over action and battles. Sounds a bit dull, but it's not. Not in the least. The level of description which Abraham brings into his work, as well as the quality of the writing, makes it all worthwhile. A total page-turner of class and plot.

13. Otherland series - Tad Williams

This one is a bit under the radar of most fantasy readers as it's classified as sci-fi. Well, it's not. With the exception of the first book in this four-book series, it reads and feels like fantasy. Great characters, well-crafted writing, rich imagination and pace which is significantly faster than Williams' other books.

14. Drenai Series and standalones - David Gemmel


In the end, I couldn't decide which series or book by Gemmel I liked best, so I decided to save myself the dilemma and bundle them all together. Short, brutal, and to the point, often telling the story of the most unlikely anti-heroes you can think of, with tons of action to boot.

15. Watership Down - Richard Adams

A children story that can be read at any age. Today, with the upsurgance of YA literature, it sounds like a marketing line, but in this case it's the simple truth. Adams' rabbits have more personality, mythology, and feelings than most authors manage to attach to their human characters.

16. Black Company - Glen Cook

A vicious pace, unlikely protagonists, and extremely effective writing makes this series highly enjoyable. You will not find redundant pages about hair, braids, court ettiquete, or unnecessary history. What you will find is a good story, full of action, believable characters, and plot twists. Military fantasy at its best.

17. Stormlight Archives - Brandon Sanderson

A classic epic fantasy, traditional in every sense of the word, and yet the story manages to catch you and keep you reading until late at night. Good vs. evil, Light vs. dark, preservation vs. destruction. This is fantasy that goes back to the roots of Tolkien and Jordan. Only two books have been published so far, but from the look of things this will be Sanderson's greatest work.

18. Dresden Files - Jim Butcher

It may not be great literature. The writing is a little bit sexist. It even has vampires and werewolves into it. Doesn't really matter. The story of the first urban wizard, Harry Dresden, is nothing but pure fun. Action, mysteries, cool magic, and all delivered with a fast, flowing, and witty writing style. The success of this series spawned a generation of clones, but as was said by a character no less mythical than Harry, there can be only one.

19. Weaveworld - Clive Barker

Clive Barker is mainly a horror writer, approaching fantasy from the other side. Weaveworld is his own answer to fairy stories, although this time some of the fairies have teeth, nails, and one crazy advertising man, and they are not shy about using either. This is a story of a world within a world, and of the people who get stuck in the middle of it and are forced to choose sides, all told with a little bit of horror on the side.

20. Gentlemen Bastard Series - Scott Lynch

One of the books which is a pure fun to read. You'd think the story of rogues and thieves would be simple and shallow, but this is not the case at all. Deep characters, good action and clever writing makes this books so much more, while still being unassuming and accessible.

21. The Talisman - Stephen King and Peter Straub

Another Fantasy/Horror blend. Stephen King is known to all and everyone has their favorite book by him. Well, this is mine. Co-written with another horror writer, Peter Straub, thus neatly allowing me to reach my target of 25 authors in this list. This is a surreal story of a parallel world, friendship, a journey through dimensions, a hopeless quest, and yes, some really scary monsters and disgusting creatures. Some of them doesn't even look human from the outside.

22. City of Stairs - Robert Jackson Bennett


An amazing story which starts out small but expands the further you go into it. It's practically impossible to categorize this one. Is it epic fantasy? Urban fantasy? New Weird? It is all of the above and much more than that. One second you read about ancient gods and mythology, and the next you are hanging on for dear life as the action gets thicker. Compelling story, characters and writing makes Bennett one of the great new voices in current fantasy.

23. The Riddle-Master of Hed Trilogy - Patricia A. McKillip


I need a proper disclaimer for this one: I read this series a long, long time ago. I remember really liking it, but to be honest I can barely remember the characters or the plot. So, in this case, I was happy to see it in Ben's top 100 list as it allowed me to trust his judgement and to include it in my own top 25. Basically, it's a coming of age story, combined with a quest and a war, when the fate of the kingdom is on the line. What makes this series unique from countless others is the rich prose and the great characters you will care about. The last book in the trilogy, Harpist in the Wind, won the 1980 Hugo award, and no puppies were included in that choice.

24. The Night Watch - Sergei Lukyanenko

Urban fantasy that ignores the basic assumptions of the genre and replaces it with story and characters that are more realistic. Nothing is what it seems: The good guys can be ruthless and evil. the bad guys can be innocent and endearing. Of course, the beauty of it is that sometimes the above mentioned statement is not true. Reading the book is sort of watching a chess game between two opposing sides and at the same time looking at the game from the viewpoint of the pawns.

25. The Wheel of Time - Robert Jordan

A slightly political choice on my part. This series is uneven as it can possibly be: A very good first third, a mind-numbingly boring second third and an adequate third third. There are books which I liked better on the whole that I left out of this list, but I can't ignore Jordan's impact on the genre and the fact that during the 1990's, his books, along with a precious few others, were the only available decent fantasy books. Hence, Wheel of Time gets the honor of closing off this list.
 
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ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#46
To close, a few more books that, had I written the list in a slightly different mood, might have been on it:
Tigana - Guy Gavriel Kay
The City & the City - China Mieville
The Magicians trilogy -Lev Grossman
The Night Circus - Erin Morgenstern
Duncton Wood - William Horwood
Faust Among Equals - Tom Holt
Nos4A2 - Joe Hill
A Cavern of Black Ice - J.V Jones
Good Omens - Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
Orb Scepter Throne by Ian Esslemont
And other books by Robbin Hobb, Tad Williams and Neil Gaiman.
 
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ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#48
Thanks @Alucard ! Made me blush! :happy:
Seriously, it was fun making this list, plus how many guys can say that they discovered the maximum length of an allowed post here? (10k notes BTW) It should be a trophy all by itself. ;)
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#49
I think this represents all of the fantasy book I have read and includes some weak efforts imo.

97 Kingkiller Chronicles (Trilogy by Patrick Rothfuss)
The Name of the Wind blew me away. The unique and fantastic style of writing and story is out of this world. Not your typical fantasy. Love the main character Kvothe and most of the other characters. The second book ballooned to over 1000 pages and dragged at a couple spots but I still loved it. Can't wait for the final book to come out in 2045!

95 Lightbringer Series (5 books by Brent Weeks)
This is not traditional fantasy. It's R-rated for adult content and violence. The good guys don't always ecape and the characters are fantastic. The magic system is very different with powers based on the ability to manipulate colours. I thought all of the first four books were great giving them 5/5. The final book let me down but overall a tremendous series.

94 Game of Thrones
I titled this Game of Thrones instead of ASOIAF since I watched the first 3 seasons on TV first, then read 2.7 books to learn more, then stopped to avoid spoilers with wife and fact I hate adaptations that have changes. Gritty, gruesome and wonderful. My score largely reflects the TV as it's hard to split my thoughts apart. I think the TV show is actually better than the book. Very little magic. The final few seasons of GOT are not that great but overall score for impact on me from the earlier seasons.

94 Wool Omnibus (Hugh Howey)
Science Fiction Not fantasy but I loved this sci-fi post apocalyptic work! I had to mention it.

92 Vicious (VE Schwab)
LOVED the first book. A mutant, x-men type of story without being a comic book type thing at all. Modern setting. The book is also written with many flashbacks to fill in the details. I'm not normally a fan of that but it worked and it's a great read. I will not reduce the score for the second book which was a waste of time. Do not bother with it.

92 Uprooted (Naomi Novik)
A fairy tale type of book with a love story and some twists. I loved this book. Single book only but I thought it was fantastic.

88 Red Rising Trilogy (Pierce Brown)
Make no mistake. The first book resembles Hunger Games a lot. I still loved it. The next two books were unique and still great to me. This is sci-fi and while I wouldn't call it young adult some would. A great set of characters and action sequences.

88 Skyward Series (4 books Brandon Sanderson)
I've only read the first two books in this sci-fi YA series and they were great. These books are CLEARLY YA. While they have been 450-500 pages they are still written at a level for a 10 year old to read without problem. Quite frankly I questioned why this series was recommended to me when I first started reading. But the main girl is a great character. It reminds me of How to Train Your Dragon in some ways. There is a mystery, great characters, and great story. It's not filled with too many characters to distract either. The second book is quite different than the first book and filled with new characters and still pulls off the same charm.

87 Stormlight Archive (10 book series; 2 five part book series Brandon Sanderson)
This is higher fantasy with a lot of magical elements to it. It centers around a handful of characters and the magic system is very cool. Both books are around 1000 pages so this is a long effort but a very good one. Wasn't a huge fan of YA Steelheart (comic book/sci-fi) but this is a very good Sanderson read. He writes fast and clean. Update: Read the third book which was disappointing. Not shocking that the middle book in a 5 book arc is a down one but for a book as long as it was there isn't much to really talk about. The characters can be too good two shoes.

87 Unhewn Throne Trilogy (Brian Stavely)
Read the first two books. Three kids of a slained Emperor try to solve their father's murder. Mystery is a big part here. The two sons are my favourite with one raised as a monk and another as a military specialist. A really good cast of side characters, a bit formulaic but a great story. I preferred the first book as I found Kaden not quite as interesting in book two. Final book Jan 2016.

85 Mistborn Trilogy (Brandon Sanderson)
This had a cool magic system that resembled the Matrix more than a fantasy series. Good mystery, characters and story. At times the religious overtones were a bit too much. A fun read that dragged a little at times.

85 Chronicles of the Black Gate (5 books by Phil Tucker)
All books were really solid and it's world is based on a religion surrounding a 7 level caste system where you move up/down at death. The magic and characters were well done. A fairly unique world that reminds me of World of Warcraft characters. Very enjoyable.

85 Wheel of Time (Robert Jordan)
I think an 85 is a solid figure for me. A few really bad books dragged this down. But it is hard to recommend this series to anyone other than a hardcore fantasy reader since it's 14 books long plus a prequel! It's old school in many ways - youngsters grow up to save the world type characters (to a degree), enemy beasts trollocs (just like orcs) and a big bad god like bad guy trying to wreck everything. But there are so many good characters that are also diverse in this series. Many strong female characters and after a male dominated book 1 the women generally run the show in many ways. Books 8-10 are simply bad. They are slow, uneventful for the most part and drag on. I know at least two people who quit reading the series in this time. But if you push through the series is really good. Most books I would not rate excellent but when you have finished reading this epic saga many characters will stay with you forever.

83 Raven's Shadow Trilogy (Anthony Ryan)
The first book Blood Song was fantastic. Coming of age story with a great main character. I felt the supporting cast was a bit weak but a great start. The second book changed the formula and went from one POV to 4! That ticked off some people but it was still enjoyable. Update: The final book was lousy. Such a disappointment. I re-read the first two books and they are both as good or better than remembered but the third book sucked and really drags the score down. Could have been 90+.

83 Codex Alera (Jim Butcher - 6 books)
This was a weird fantasy series with particular magic but the characters and story were really good. It's a very fun, action packed series to read. I did find the women overly emotional, subject to fatigue and crying a lot. A lit too much stereotyping going on but zero regrets reading this.

83 The First Law Series by Joe Abercrombie
I really liked Logen. Wasn't a fan of Glotka and that hurt my overall enjoyment I supposed. From an author that is supposed to be Lord Grimdark I did not find it overly so. A bit of fast travel at one point that I shook my head at but a very good series.

83 The Lions of Al-Rassan (Guy Gavriel Kay)
This is a standalone book that resembles a middle eastern Game of Thrones very loosely based on history. This was a really good book that I would have liked to have seen expanded. I felt there was more to explore but some might like the fact it was a solo effort. Some great main characters. No magic that I remember.

83 The Divine Cities Trilogy (Robert Bennett)
This was more of an urban fantasy series as the technology is much further along. The books rotate centering around different primary characters. I think the author could have built his world a little better initially as it wasn't always easy to picture the world for me. The first book is almost a standalone and I read it and quit for awhile. I later returned to the series and I found I liked each book more as I read which is rare for fantasy. Each book improved and this was a fun mystery type of series as well.

83 Riyria Revelations (Michael Sullivan)
Fun trilogy between a human and an elf that are more like Robin Hood. Thieves that aren't really bad guys. Fun, pg-13 series that isn't overly serious.

83 Broken Earth Trilogy (NK Nemesin)
This was more of a futuristic dystopia that I liked. Sexuality and many versions of it are explored throughout so if you are prudish I don't think this is for you. A gritty story that I enjoyed.

81 Farseer Trilogy (Robin Hobb)
Robin Hobb writes well. I enjoy her world and her characters. But her books can drag and they aren't epic in nature. For a well written story that should probably move at a faster pace it is still enjoyable. I liked this series more than Liveship Traders I think but the sheer lack of something truly epic holds it back. I did feel the final book was the weakest.

81 Legends of the First Empires (Michael Sullivan)
I believe this two part trilogy (i read the first 3 books) was supposed to be his epic fantasy. Some traditional dwarves and fantasy tropes come into play which I liked as everything new age isn't always the bast. A battle between humans and elves? Sign me up. Some weird industrial revolution type stuff comes into play but the story, mystery and characters were well done.

80 Dagger and the Coin (Daniel Abraham)
This was a solid fantasy series. It's cerebral and a bit too slow. If it was faster paced I would have given it a better score. Some characters were annoying.

80 Liveship Traders (Robin Hobb)
Robin Hobb writes well. I enjoy her world and her characters. But her books can drag and they aren't epic in nature. For a well written story that should probably move at a faster pace it is still enjoyable. I did feel the final book was the weakest.

80 Night Angel Series (Brent Weeks)
I preferred the Lightbringer series. This series is good. It's also darker with main characters that aren't always likeable.

80 Twinborn Trilogy (J.S. Morin)
This is an indie trilogy that deals with "twinborns". Your mirror image in another world (only a handful are). Classic epic fantasy with a cool twist. Traditional magic with runes and spells. The first book was really good while the last two suffered from too many forced twists and turns. The ending was great though. I enjoyed the trilogy.

77 Traitor Son Series (Miles Cameron)
I really enjoyed the first book which has a great main character and some cool magic. It's gritty and was fun. The second book didn't seem to go anywhere and I gave up. My mistake? Who knows but sometimes you have to know when to pull the chute.

75 Steelheart (Brandon Sanderson)
This is a trilogy but I quit reading after the first book. I enjoyed this YA science-fiction super hero type of story. The beginning of the book really sucks you in. Then it's too many twists and turns and YA writing imo. While I liked it I didn't read on. My son liked all 3 books though.

75 Powder Mage Trilogy (Brian McClellan)
I only read book one and stopped. Cool gunpowder fantasy premise and some good characters. Really enjoyed the first half of the book but the second half had too many things denying plausibility. Good guys impossible to die and one character KaPoel whose development was ridiculously off the charts. When the second book started out with a secret tunnel I gave up. If I want unrealistic writing I'll watch the Dark Knight (but I won't subject myself to that again either). Gods and magic are prevalent.

71 The Hobbit
I started reading this to my kids and they got bored so I just read it myself. A fun traditional YA story that suffers when compared to modern adult fantasy books. (I haven't read LOTR, just seen the movies.)

70 Immortal Treachery (5 book series by Allan Batchelder )
LOVED the first book Blood, Steel and Fire. Loved the main character, story and fighting. Some humour. This book written more like a screenplay. Really didn't like the second book (sorry Allan). Simply felt the side characters story was largely pointless and the main character champion fighting a bit too simple. Can't comment on the rest of the series but I would highly recommend reading the first book.

70 Prince of Thorns Trilogy (Mark Lawrence)
I wasn't a huge fan of the first book and quit reading. Maybe Lawrence isn't for me.

70 Malazan Book of the Fallen (10 book completed series by Steven Erikson)
I only read the first book Gardens of the Moon. This reads like a good DragonLance book. Fast paced story that has too many high fantasy magical elements for my current taste and doesn't focus enough on the characters. I did like it but I won't be continuing this series after the first book. Not quite my cup of tea.

69 Dragonlance Chronicles (Trilogy by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman)
Traditional, predictable, popcorn fantasy that I read early on and enjoyed but probably wouldn't read something like this again. A Dungeons and Dragon book never short on action which isn't a good thing necessarily.

68 The Hero and the Crown (Robin McKinley)
A standalone fantasy book with a female heroine. This short book (a little over 300 pages) was fantastic in the first half. I loved it! Then the second half was completely rushed and disappointing. It was as though there was a page limit or something. Could have been much better!

60 Six of Crows, Dragonbone Chair, Grace of Kings (quit partway through)
All books I was disappointed in and didn't continue reading.

40 American Gods (Neil Gaman)
Quit reading this book half way through. Too slow and weird. If you loved this book you probably loved the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Don't get how people thought this was so good.

40 Mad Tinker Chronicles (J.S.Morin)
This is a trilogy based off the Twinborn world written earlier. Not close to his Twinborn effort. He tried to recreate the same type of magic as a Steampunk effort and the characters and story failed. Gave up early on in book 2.
 
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Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#50
I think this represents all of the fantasy book I have read and includes some weak efforts imo.

1 97 Kingkiller Chronicles (Trilogy by Patrick Rothfuss)
The Name of the Wind blew me away. The unique and fantastic style of writing and story is out of this world. Not your typical fantasy. Love the main character Kvothe and most of the other characters. The second book ballooned to over 1000 pages and dragged at a couple spots but I still loved it. Can't wait for the final book to come out in 2045!

2 95 Game of Thrones
I titled this Game of Thrones instead of ASOIAF since I watched the first 3 seasons on TV first, then read 2.7 books to learn more, then stopped to avoid spoilers with wife and fact I hate adaptations that have changes. Gritty, gruesome and wonderful. My score largely reflects the TV as it's hard to split my thoughts apart. I think the TV show is actually better than the book. Very little magic.

3 94 Wool Omnibus (Hugh Howey)
Science Fiction Not fantasy but I loved this sci-fi post apocalyptic work! I had to mention it.

4 88 Stormlight Archive (10 book series Brandon Sanderson)
This is higher fantasy with a lot of magical elements to it. It centers around a handful of characters and the magic system is very cool. Both books are around 1000 pages so this is a long effort but a very good one. Wasn't a huge fan of YA Steelheart (comic book/sci-fi) but this is a very good Sanderson read. He writes fast and clean.

5 87 Unhewn Throne Trilogy (Brian Stavely)
Read the first two books. Three kids of a slained Emperor try to solve their father's murder. Mystery is a big part here. The two sons are my favourite with one raised as a monk and another as a military specialist. A really good cast of side characters, a bit formulaic but a great story. I preferred the first book as I found Kaden not quite as interesting in book two. Final book Jan 2016.

6 87 Raven's Shadow Trilogy (Anthony Ryan)
The first book Blood Song was fantastic. Coming of age story with a great main character. I felt the supporting cast was a bit weak but a great start. The second book changed the formula and went from one POV to 4! That ticked off some people but it was still enjoyable. Third book coming July 2015.

7 84 The Lions of Al-Rassan (Guy Gavriel Kay)
This is a standalone book that resembles a middle eastern Game of Thrones very loosely based on history. This was a really good book that I would have liked to have seen expanded. I felt there was more to explore but some might like the fact it was a solo effort. Some great main characters. No magic that I remember.

8 80 Twinborn Trilogy (J.S. Morin)
This is an indie trilogy that deals with "twinborns". Your mirror image in another world (only a handful are). Classic epic fantasy with a cool twist. Traditional magic with runes and spells. The first book was really good while the last two suffered from too many forced twists and turns. The ending was great though. I enjoyed the trilogy.

9 75 Powder Mage Trilogy (Brian McClellan)
I only read book one and stopped. Cool gunpowder fantasy premise and some good characters. Really enjoyed the first half of the book but the second half had too many things denying plausibility. Good guys impossible to die and one character KaPoel whose development was ridiculously off the charts. When the second book started out with a secret tunnel I gave up. If I want unrealistic writing I'll watch the Dark Knight (but I won't subject myself to that again either). Gods and magic are prevalent.

10 71 The Hobbit
I started reading this to my kids and they got bored so I just read it myself. A fun traditional YA story that suffers when compared to modern adult fantasy books. (I haven't read LOTR, just seen the movies.)

11 70 Malazan Book of the Fallen (10 book completed series by Steven Erikson)
I only read the first book Gardens of the Moon. This reads like a good DragonLance book. Fast paced story that has too many high fantasy magical elements for my current taste and doesn't focus enough on the characters. I did like it but I won't be continuing this series after the first book. Not quite my cup of tea.

12 69 Dragonlance Chronicles (Trilogy by Margaret Weiss and Tracy Hickman)
Traditional, predictable, popcorn fantasy that I read early on and enjoyed but probably wouldn't read something like this again. A Dungeons and Dragon book never short on action which isn't a good thing necessarily.

13 68 The Hero and the Crown (Robin McKinley)
A standalone fantasy book with a female heroine. This short book (a little over 300 pages) was fantastic in the first half. I loved it! Then the second half was completely rushed and disappointing. It was as though there was a page limit or something. Could have been much better!

14 40 American Gods (Neil Gaman)
Quit reading this book half way through. Too slow and weird. If you loved this book you probably loved the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Don't get how people thought this was so good.

15 40 Mad Tinker Chronicles (J.S.Morin)
This is a trilogy based off the Twinborn world written earlier. Not close to his Twinborn effort. He tried to recreate the same type of magic as a Steampunk effort and the characters and story failed. Gave up early on in book 2.
Interesting list. You rated American Gods quite low. I absolutely loved this book, but to each his own of course. One piece of advice though: read the second book in the Malazan series. The first book is regarded by almost everyone I know to be Erikson's weakest effort. The second books is much more interesting, while the thridbook is on par with A Storm of Swords (ASOIAF). Reading between the lines it seems that you don't like books in which magic plays a big role. Is this correct, or did I miss the mark here?
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#51
14 40 American Gods (Neil Gaman)
Quit reading this book half way through. Too slow and weird. If you loved this book you probably loved the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Don't get how people thought this was so good.
I loved American Gods (not a criticism, everyone has a different taste) and yet loathed The Rocky Horror Picture Show.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#54
what are all those numbers in that list :wideyed:
Judging by the comments they're ratings (negative comments at the low numbers, very favorable comments at the higher numbers).
 

rudyjuly2

Journeyed there and back again
#56
Interesting list. You rated American Gods quite low. I absolutely loved this book, but to each his own of course. One piece of advice though: read the second book in the Malazan series. The first book is regarded by almost everyone I know to be Erikson's weakest effort. The second books is much more interesting, while the thridbook is on par with A Storm of Swords (ASOIAF). Reading between the lines it seems that you don't like books in which magic plays a big role. Is this correct, or did I miss the mark here?
Yeah, I do like magic but my tastes have changed and I'd rather it not be too over the top.

I just found American gods slow and very weird. Rocky horror picture show was very weird so that was my connection. I know many love that book which is why I tried it but simply didn't care for it.

And the number. Ber were my rankings of each series out of 100. Sorry for the bad formatting.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#57
Yeah, I do like magic but my tastes have changed and I'd rather it not be too over the top.

I just found American gods slow and very weird. Rocky horror picture show was very weird so that was my connection. I know many love that book which is why I tried it but simply didn't care for it.

And the number. Ber were my rankings of each series out of 100. Sorry for the bad formatting.
That was a nicely done list, rudyjuly2. That takes a lot of time to do doesn't it?
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#60