Scary books for October

Sir Arthur

Journeyed there and back again
#1
I always read a horror book of some sort in late October . Usually, it ends up being the only one I read all year. I should change that, because I always enjoy them.

I love 19 century gothic horror, and there's still a few classics of that genre I've yet to read, but this year I chose a contemporary author. Dan "the man" Simmons, and his book The Terror.

The Terror has been on my radar for a few years, but I've been deterred by the its length. Almost 1000 pages. Do I really want to spend two or three weeks reading a horror novel? Apparently so.

Two evenings and 10 percent in or about 96 pages in the old language, and I believe I'll be happy to spend the rest of the month reading this fantastic speculative historical fiction novel.


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TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
#2
I enjoyed The Terror, despite not liking the ending. I won't go into reasons, but I've read a lot of posts by other members to suggest I'm in the minority, so I hope you like it! I rarely read horror any more, despite it being the only thing I'd read as a 'younger reader'. I should rectify that, especially at this time of year.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#3
I read the Horror some months ago and I liked it a lot. Definitely recommended. The claustrophobic, Arctic atmosphere should work great for those cold, long winter nights where you sit huddled in your favorite sofa besides the dying embers in the hearth.
 

Nuomer1

Journeyed there and back again
#5
Is Halloween as big in other countries as it is in the USA? Seems to get more popular every year
Sadly becoming so. Here in UK we used to have our own Halloween traditions, and ways of celebrating - similar to US, but with an English flavour. Unfortunately they are rapidly being replaced by American-style excuses for children to run wild, sometimes for several days ahead of the Big Day.
Its not simple Americanisation - it is our children taking the parts of American culture that they like, without the cultural constraints, and using the result as an excuse for appalling behaviour. The real tragedy is that the parents apparently haven't noticed, and let their little darlings go ahead and annoy the neighbours without constraint.
Enough! I am turning into a Grinch.
 

TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
#6
Sadly becoming so. Here in UK we used to have our own Halloween traditions, and ways of celebrating - similar to US, but with an English flavour. Unfortunately they are rapidly being replaced by American-style excuses for children to run wild, sometimes for several days ahead of the Big Day.
Its not simple Americanisation - it is our children taking the parts of American culture that they like, without the cultural constraints, and using the result as an excuse for appalling behaviour. The real tragedy is that the parents apparently haven't noticed, and let their little darlings go ahead and annoy the neighbours without constraint.
Enough! I am turning into a Grinch.
Well, to the contrary (and for another UK perspective), it's all a lot more civilised where I am. Kids go trick or treating, but only at the houses where there is a pumpkin outside. There's no appalling behaviour, it's all very much a family friendly affair. I'm planning on taking my daughter out trick or treating next year when she'll be old enough .. I can't wait!
 

Nuomer1

Journeyed there and back again
#7
Well, to the contrary (and for another UK perspective), it's all a lot more civilised where I am. Kids go trick or treating, but only at the houses where there is a pumpkin outside. There's no appalling behaviour, it's all very much a family friendly affair. I'm planning on taking my daughter out trick or treating next year when she'll be old enough .. I can't wait!
Where-ever you live (Nottingham??) I envy you. I live in the north-east, on a better-than-average looking housing estate - but even so, my wife and I always plan to be away from the house from about 2:00 onwards on halloween, and usually on the day before as well.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#8
It's getting bigger and bigger here in the Netherlands as well.

We've always had Sint Maarten on November 11. This is a Catholic holiday during which -in true pragmastic Dutch fashion- the entire country participates, no matter the religious background. It's similar to Halloween in that children go from house to house begging for candy. The only real difference is that at Halloween kids are supposed to dress up whilst trick or treating, whereas at Sint Maarten they instead walk the streets with lampoons and sing Sint Maarten carols.

With the ongoing Americanization Halloween is getting more and more popular among chidren as an extra opportunity to collect candy. Also, there are a lot of adult Halloween parties nowadays that are a perfect opportunity for adolescents and young adults to wear slutty clothes and drink a lot of alcohol. It is not uncommon to see a vampire fornicating with a Donald Trump in some alley-way after the festivities have drawn to an end.
 

Diziet Sma

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#9
In the German speaking part of Switzerland, kids celebrate Räbeliechtli. An evening parade the second Saturday of November(actually, it could well be related to Sint Marteen@Silvion Night) with lanterns carved out of turnips. Freaking hard work! I almost lost two fingers while carving one with my students.
 

TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
#10
Where-ever you live (Nottingham??) I envy you. I live in the north-east, on a better-than-average looking housing estate - but even so, my wife and I always plan to be away from the house from about 2:00 onwards on halloween, and usually on the day before as well.
In a village in Nottinghamshire, so almost. To be fair I think most cities/towns are as you described. Luckily it's all very good natured where I am :)
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#11
In the German speaking part of Switzerland, kids celebrate Räbeliechtli. An evening parade the second Saturday of November(actually, it could well be related to Sint Marteen@Silvion Night) with lanterns carved out of turnips. Freaking hard work! I almost lost two fingers while carving one with my students.
That's awesome! It's interesting to see how these holidays are similar across Europe. They probably all have their origins in some pagan festivities, kind of how Christmas and Saint Nicolas.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#12
Where-ever you live (Nottingham??) I envy you. I live in the north-east, on a better-than-average looking housing estate - but even so, my wife and I always plan to be away from the house from about 2:00 onwards on halloween, and usually on the day before as well.
Wow, pretty dramatic. What sorts of bad behavior do they engage in?
 

Nuomer1

Journeyed there and back again
#13
Wow, pretty dramatic. What sorts of bad behavior do they engage in?
Nothing serious, but persistent. Small children in costume, larger children who should have grown out of it dressed as goths (probably think they are scary vampires), tapping on windows, holding down doorbells, annoying the dog, vandalising garden plants - but the real problem is that all except this last are generally supervised by the doting parents standing 30/40 yards away and watching in case I do something to scare their little darlings, or fail to offer the statutory sweets or cash, or maybe turn out to be a paedophile.
To understand that last, you have to live in Britain and be familiar with the current hysteria. Mediaeval witch-hunts were just practice. A few years ago a woman was murdered, apparently because she had her job description "paediatrician" on a plate by her front door, and her assailant was not a good reader.
I am a retired junior-school teacher, and I think I was a good one (after more than 25 years teaching, I think there are three former pupils who would not greet me with 'Hello Sir!' and a friendly handshake) - but the rules are breaking down, children are not brought up to behave or to have any consideration for others - and their parents support them whatever they do.
I must stop ranting.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#14
Nothing serious, but persistent. Small children in costume, larger children who should have grown out of it dressed as goths (probably think they are scary vampires), tapping on windows, holding down doorbells, annoying the dog, vandalising garden plants - but the real problem is that all except this last are generally supervised by the doting parents standing 30/40 yards away and watching in case I do something to scare their little darlings, or fail to offer the statutory sweets or cash, or maybe turn out to be a paedophile.
To understand that last, you have to live in Britain and be familiar with the current hysteria. Mediaeval witch-hunts were just practice. A few years ago a woman was murdered, apparently because she had her job description "paediatrician" on a plate by her front door, and her assailant was not a good reader.
I am a retired junior-school teacher, and I think I was a good one (after more than 25 years teaching, I think there are three former pupils who would not greet me with 'Hello Sir!' and a friendly handshake) - but the rules are breaking down, children are not brought up to behave or to have any consideration for others - and their parents support them whatever they do.
I must stop ranting.
Thanks, as a long-time teacher you've seen it all. I asked because I was flashing back on my misbehaviors on Halloween and wondered if I was as bad as I remember. I don't recall any property damage but everything else...I was a right miscreant.
 

Cephalophore

A farm boy with a sword
#15
Halloween doesn't seem to be very big here in Australia. I've never had costumed children come to my door, and I've never (until this year!) been invited to a Halloween party. And to be honest I've always been kind of envious of those American Halloween parties you see on TV and in movies, where everyone dresses up!
 

Khartun

Journeyed there and back again
#16
Halloween doesn't seem to be very big here in Australia. I've never had costumed children come to my door, and I've never (until this year!) been invited to a Halloween party. And to be honest I've always been kind of envious of those American Halloween parties you see on TV and in movies, where everyone dresses up!
They are lots of fun. My wife and I have been throwing them every year since we moved into our house. This will be the first year we haven't had our own party. We will be going to someone else's.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#17
Meanwhile I will be sitting back and giggling as my dog howls every time the doorbell rings (she is a Rottweiler and she SOUNDS like a huge dog because she IS a huge dog; last year she wasn't territorial because we were new to the house but now she barks every time someone even walks by on the street or the neighbors take their garbage out). My husband will be handing out candy because I hate kids. My poor cats will be beating the bedroom door down trying to get loose but I can't have them roaming the house if the door is going to be open every few minutes.
 

Sir Arthur

Journeyed there and back again
#19
Halloween is a lot of fun for the kids here in Bellingham, Wa. All the downtown shops hand out candy. It's fun to see all the costumes. Some folks really put a lot of effort into it. Last year my daughter was Princess Leia, this year a more generic faerie princess. 4 year old Leia was awesome though. She wore the costume again when we saw the movie at the theater.
A local theater club puts on a kind of zombie dance. The dancers are all kids, it's actually kind of freaky in an unintended, and awkward kind of way, but children enjoy it. Also, a large haunted labyrinth, that ends at a brew pub. ;)
 

Andrew.J

Journeyed there and back again
#20
No trick-or-treating as of this moment. It seems Halloween hasn't become that popular here yet.
Thank God. I've already eaten all the candy I bought for myself. :finger:

Uh, so what happens exactly if I don't have a treat?

Because I don't like where this is going.