The Great Discworld Thread

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#1
Seeing as that there are several forum members who are currently (re) reading the Discworld books (written by the great Terry Pratchett), I thought it would be a fun idea to make a thread in which all things Discworld can be discussed.

There have been several such threads in the past, but all petered out eventually. As I plan on reading all 41 Discworld main-series novels (at the time of writing this post I'm at number 10), my intention is to keep this thread alive for at least the time it will take me to finish the series (and hopefully even longer).

Down below you'll find my first reviews of the Discworld books. Feel free to add your own or contribute in any other way you like.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#2
The Great Discworld Journey
Ever since I started reading fantasy I've been aware of the Discworld books. However, as reading such a big series was dauntful to my young mind, I never read a single volume. I kept pushing it forward and forward and I never came around to actually starting on it, until finally I lost interest in the series altogether. Then, in 2015, Terry Practchett passed away. As often in these situations the deceased author was all over the news. Fantasy lovers from all over the world lamented Pratchett's passing. It was said that the fantasy world will never see his like again. This rekindled my interest in Pratchett and his stories. I had to find out what all the fuss was about. Reading the Discworld series became my resolution for the year 2016. In June I started my Discworld journey. After just a couple of days I was sold; these books are something special. The journey will be epic indeed. I invite you to join me in my adventure.


Discworld Reading Order
I have decided not to stick with any of the reading orders that can be found on the internet or otherwise. I've opted to read the series in the order of publication. My reasons are: This way I expect to see the writing (and writing style) evolve. Also, as the publishing order "mixes up" the different story lines, the risk of any one story line becoming stale is slim. Furthermore, certain themes in books don't always age well. As Pratchett is a satirical writer who often comments on the world of today, I expect the themes will get more relevant (and therefore more fun) the further the story progresses. What I'm trying to say is that I'm saving the best for last.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#3
<Reviews posted in the 'What are you reading' threads>

Review: The Colour of Magic (Discworld 1)
I finished The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett (Discworld). It was a fun read. I particularly liked the imagninative setting and the style of the humour in the book -however much they suck at about anything else in life, the Brits sure have a great sense of humour:bag:-. Unfortunately, I was not blown away by it. The story meandered a lot and I'm not overly fond of Rincewind to be honest. However, I have been told that the books only get better as the series progresses, so I've got high hopes for the next installments. I rate this first book in the Discworld series with a 6.5/10 (***3 GoodReads Stars).


Review: The Light Fantastic (Discworld 2)
I finished The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett (Discworld 2). I liked this one better than the first book. The story had a clear start, middle and ending and because of that meandered way less than book 1. Also, Rincewind grew on me as a character. The addition of Cohen the Barbarian was also fun, as I liked him better than Hrun who was the hero in book 1. I'm still not blown away by Discworld, but I already have the feeling that it's getting better by the book. I rate Discworld 2 with a 7/10 (***3 GoodReads stars).


Review: Equal Rites (Discworld 3)
I finished Equal Rites (Discworld 3) by Terry Pratchett this morning. For me this one was a bit less funny than the two Rincewind books I read before, but the story was way better and I got engrossed in the character of Granny Weatherwax. I look forward to reading more about her. I rate this book 7.2/10 (***3 GoodReads Stars).


Review: Mort (Discworld 4)
I just finished Mort (Discworld 4) by Terry Pratchett. This is the best one in the series I've read so far. The characters of Mort and Death are engaging, the humour is dead-pan and morbid and the story is entertaining. I feel as if Pratchett's experimenting phase is over. This Discworld book somehow feels more comfortable. Like a good pair of boots or gloves. I rate this book with 9/10 (*****5 GoodReads stars).


Review: Sourcery (Discworld 5)
I finished Sourcery (Discworld 5) by Terry Pratchett. Of the 5 Discworld books I've read I like this one the least. It was quite a dissapointment, especially because the previous installment (Mort) was superb. The story is predictable and -dare I say this of a Pratchett novel- boring. The pace was slow and the characters were not engaging. Our protagonist Rincewind was not at his best. Also, the humour sometimes felt a bit forced. It was good for a couple of chuckles, but reading this one felt a bit like a chore. It is still an okay book, but for me it is mediocre (and only just. It's close to being bad actually) I rate this one with a 5.8/10 (*** 3 GoodReads stars).


Review: Wyrd Sisters (Discworld 6)
I finished Wyrd Sisters (Discworld 6) by Terry Pratchett. What an amazing book! It's basically a big spoof on Shakespeare. It's all about theatre, a Kingdom without a proper King and about 3 witches who are dead set on setting things aright. There are many engaging characters in this book, but Granny Weatherwax steals the show. Whereas in Equal Rites she could sometimes come across as boorish and inconsistent, Granny now is a complex, powerful, immovable and above all funny character. The humour in this book is clever and original (not like the stale jokes in Discworld 5). Almost no slapstick (what I now associate with the Rincewind storyline) and no morbid soliloquys (as in Death's novels), but witty banter between Nanny Ogg, Margrat and Granny. Now I know what people mean when they say Pratchett has the ability to crack you up with a few well placed words. I had to stop reading on several occasions because I was laughing hysterically. One part in particular where the 3 witches go and visit a theatre performance for the first time is especially funny. I read that bit 3 times and the third time it still cracked me up. But it's not just the humour that made me love this book. It's the most intricate and well crafted Discworld story I've come across to date. Also, Pratchett's erudition shines though. References to Shakespeare plays and historical events abound. Great stuff! I rate Wyrd Sisters (Discworld 6) with 9/10 (*****5 GoodReads stars).


Review: Pyramids (Discworld 7)
I just read the last pages of Pyramids (Discworld 7). This is not Pratchett's funniest book, but it is the one that for the first time whilst reading this series sometimes made me stop and think about what I had just read (where hitherto the stops were there to allow for gales of laughter). His stories are often thought provoking, but for me this one stands out in that it makes you think about why we do certain things that we take for granted. Pratchett has the unique ability to poke fun at something in anew innocent way, but at the same time the joke triggers the ratioral mind into making it realize how absurd certain things are. The main subjects that are satirised in this book are religion (including ceremonies, the clergy and traditions/practices) and politics. Pratchett shows his erudition when he borrows concepts and characters from Ancient Egyptian, Fenoecian and Greek culture. If you're into history, philosophy or science in general this book is a must read. Now, one thing this book failed in was cracking me up. It was from time to time still quite funny, but in a cynical/sarcastic way, not in an hilarious way. And that's okay. Rincewind's slapschtick or Granny's puns wouldn't really fit the atmosphere of this novel. All in all, I really liked this book. It's thought provoking and interesting to read. Less funny than the other installments in the series, it still deserves a place on every fantasy lover's book shelf. I rate this book 8/10 (****4 GoodReads Stars).

Review: Guards! Guards!(Discworld 8)
I finished Guards Guards! (Discworld 8) by Terry Pratchett and boy, what a great read this was. This is the first novel in the City Watch-storyline and I am already very excited for the rest of the books. The story in Guards! Guards! is Pratchettesquely funny. The cynical take on big city politics is good for numerous chuckles, and the banter between the guards is on the same level as the banter between Granny and Nanny in the Witches-storyline. Very amusing to read. The story itself is, as I have come to expect, not too complex, but as the series progresses I feel the stories do get more meat to them. There is definitely room for improvement in this area though. A notable point about this book is Pratchett's unblossoming penmanship. Here and there I came across some truly touching paragraphs, artfully constructed to touch the reader's heart. "Beautiful prose" are two words I never associated with the name Terry Pratchett up til now, but I see I was wrong on that account. Especially when the character of the Patrician holds forth, I was often enraptured by the great monologue or dialogue between him and Captain Vimes. No wonder then that these two were my favorite characters in this book. Vimes is a cynical, alcoholic dead-beat Guard Captain, who's character traits seem to be copied straight from an 80's film noir detective movie. The Patrician on the other hand is a loveable dictator who shares traits with Julius Caesar and Bismarck; Realpolitiks abound and the Patrician deftly sets every situation to his hand and delivers some great lessons as to how the world works in the process. Good stuf. Overall, I really enjoyed this book. Unlike Pyramids (Discworld 7) this book is educational and funny. Apparantly these two are not mutually exclusive. This one was good for some good laughs and some thoughtful silences. I rate this book with 8.8/10 (*****5 GoodReads Stars).


Review: Eric (Discworld 9)
I just read the final page of Eric (Discworld 9) by Terry Pratchett. This Rincewind novel feels like an unfinished book, and it's not just because of the meagre 150 pages. The story feels clunky, and the plot meanders all over the place (but that's usually the case with Rincewind novels). The whole story is a play on Faust, although I must say the original is more amusing. This is the first Pratchett novel that I don't like. The humour is still there, but it can't save this installment. I rate this book 5/10 (** GoodReads Stars).
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#5
Review: Moving Pictures (Discworld 10)
Today I finished Moving Pictures (Discworld 10) by Terry Pratchett. This was a fun read, but by no means my favorite Discworld novel. The story revolves around the discovery of Holy Wood (a spoof on Hollywood). Earth's-reality-Hollywood leaks through to the Discworld. A booming town is stamped out of the ground in which prospective actors, who are lured in buy the Holy Wood virus, try to make it in the movies. In a matter of weeks full coloured movies are developped, including sound-effects made by parrots. The plot follows two actors -one male, one female- who try to make it in show businesses. The parody on real-life show business and Hollywood is striking. Movie quotes and absurd film situations abound ("say hello to my little friend", "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn" etc). If you're into cinema, then you should definitely read this book. As I've become accustomed to in Pratchett's books there are some great eye-openers. There is a whole piece where one of the main characters holds a monologue about how sad it is that there are millions of people with a particular talent who are born, live and die without ever discovering that talent. A farmer who could've been the world's best chess player. A beggar who could have won the 100 meter dash at the Olympics; you catch my drift. Very porwerful stuff. Also, there was this one quote which will always stick with me. When a group of elderly wizards go cavorting around town like they did when they were younger, Pratchett ponders: "inside every old person is a young person wondering what the hell happened." This book was a bit less funny than what I'm used to with Pratchett, but the themes discussed and the observations about the world make up for that. All in all I enjoyed this book quite a lot. I rate it with 8/10 (****4 GoodReads Stars).
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#6
Review: Reaper Man (Discworld 11)
The 11th Discworld book I have just devoured is called Reaper Man, in which we return to -you guessed it- Death's storyline. This novel is simply amazing. This second book in which Death is the main character is both funny, evocative and thought-provoking. And believe it or not; Death, or 'Bill Door', which is his alias for the better part of this book, is a hearth-warming character. His humour is dead-pan (no pun intended. Okay, maybe a little bit), but his tender naivity in relation to the world of the living is prone to put a smile on the face of even the staunchest cynic.

The main themes in this story are life and death and the relationship between them. As is always the case with a Pratchett novel the themes are satyrized and ridiculed, but it often leaves one to think about the deeper meaning of it all. It is difficult to explain, so I've included a quote which I feel is striking and can act as a pars pro toto for the entire novel. It's a passage where Death, in his new job as the farm-hand Bill Door, contemplates the nature of time.

Up in the high fields the wind was strong and the sun was close and strong. Bill Door strode back and forth through the stricken grass of the hillside like a shuttle across a green weave. He wondered if he'd ever felt wind and sunlight before. Yes, he'd felt them, he must have done. But he'd never experienced them like this; the way wind pushed at you, the way the sun made you hot. The was you could feel Time passing. Carrying you with it.

This might seem like semi-philosophical drivel, but I can assure you it is not. The philosophical musings are there, but Pratchett never comes off as preaching and almost every page shows that he doesn't take himself too seriously. One cannot fail to see his erudition though. Besides funny, it is clear that Pratchett was a wise man.

The story is again not complex; Death has been sacked and has to find a new job. His replacement is pending, and therefore there is no one to escort the deceased souls to the netherworld. This results in ghosts and life force stacking up in the Discworld, causing all sorts of problems for it's inhabitants. Curses spoken aloud become inanimate, the dead refuse to die, and possessed shopping carts prey on the citizens of Ankh-Morpork. The storyline is split in two; one concerns the adventures of Death in his struggle to find a life (punt not in... aw, screw it :)) as a farm-hand/reaper man on a farm situated in the forlorn countryside. The other storyline revolves around a party of wizards, led by Archchancellor Ridcully, and a number of other characters (among which a medium, two werewolves and some undead creatures) who together try to solve the problem the unchannelled life-force causes in Ankh-Morpork. Of these storylines the one with Death is better and funnier by far. The one with Ridcully is by no means bad -and it is great to get to know the various wizards better who were up to Discworld 10 all interchangeable, but now have become more fleshed out-, but Death definitely steals the show in this book.

I feel that this may be the best Discworld novel I've read so far. This book is funny and touching at the same time. I give it 9.2/10 (*****5 GoodReads Stars).
 

wakarimasen

Journeyed there and back again
#7
Good thread. I agree with you on pretty much all of this @Silvion Night - and it's heartwarming to watch your journey. Makes me feel like a proud parent. I randomly found Pyramids on a library shelf back in '89 and darted around the sequence, but my reactions to the various books were almost identical to yours. You've met the best characters I'd say, although I have a soft spot for Lao Tse as well. These books sit in their own category for me, whether they're good or bad, Discworld books seem to bridge a fantasy gap like no others. The fact that so many non 'fantasy readers' read them is indicative of that. I love 'em. There's a reason my youngest daughter's name is Esme.
 

Nuomer1

Journeyed there and back again
#9
Nice thread - and I generally agree with the reviews, comments, etc.
One glitch . . .
There is a book titled "Strata" that is not officially part of the Discworld series. It was one of Sir Terry's very early works - Wiki says published 1981, which sounds about right ('Colour of Magic' was 1983). The world is a disc - but it runs on advanced tech rather than magic. It could be regarded as a trial or practice piece . . . you should read it at some point, just for comparison.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#10
Nice thread - and I generally agree with the reviews, comments, etc.
One glitch . . .
There is a book titled "Strata" that is not officially part of the Discworld series. It was one of Sir Terry's very early works - Wiki says published 1981, which sounds about right ('Colour of Magic' was 1983). The world is a disc - but it runs on advanced tech rather than magic. It could be regarded as a trial or practice piece . . . you should read it at some point, just for comparison.
Thanks for the heads up. I'll definitely check it out after I finished the main series.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#11
Review: Witches Abroad (Discworld 12)
The best thing about Witches Abroad (Discworld 12) by Terry Pratchett is the hilarious banter between the three witches around which the story revolves; the flippant and skittish Margrat Garlick, world-wise matron Nanny Ogg and the indomitable Granny Weatherwax. I just finished this book and although this is not one of those Pratchett books that I would label as 'important' because of its interesting theme (like for example Reaper Man), it is one of the more amusing installments so far in the series.

The main theme in this book is Stories. Pratchett states that although it is often said that people shape stories, it is in fact precisely they other way around. These stories are floating around the Discworld, waiting to latch on to something. Each story replays itself in different times and places, (disc)world without end.

In a faraway land a girl called Ember Ella (get it?) seeks help from her fairy godmother. However, the godmother has just died and passed on her wand to the inexperienced Margrat Garlick. Together with Granny and Nanny she embarks on a journey to "foreign parts" with as end destination the famed city of Genua. Along the way the witches stumble from story to story. They meet little red riding hood, the big bad wolf, sleeping beauty and many other fairy tale creatures (even Gollum plays a very small role). When the witches arrive in Genua they've got their work cut out for them, as they find the city to be the playground of two magnificent powers; a mysterious voodoo priestess and a sorceress who turns out to be an acquaintance of our very own Granny.

The squabbling, bickering and banter between the witches is the best part of this book by far. There are some very funny moments, especially when the witches come into contact with foreigners. The part where Granny plays poker with a thug must be one of the funniest scenes I've ever read. Also, whenever Nanny gets her hands on some alcohol shenanigans -often sex related, as Nanny is at all times a feisty lady- are sure to ensue. Funny stuff.

The story itself doesn't hold up all too well when compared to other novels I've read in the series so far. I felt it kind of petered out from the halfway point onwards. No harm done though, as our witches can carry a novel all by themselves with their antics.

All in all I am very satisfied by this read. It wasn't the best Discworld story I've read, but it holds its own very well. I rate this book with a 8.2/10 (****4 GoodReads Stars).
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#12
Keep them coming - great to read this journey. I have to say so far your opinions are markedly similar to mine on the series and if that holds, you're in for a treat, as personally Discworld takes off like a rocket right about where you are.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#13
Review: Small Gods (Discworld 13)
I finished Small Gods (Discworld 13).

This is one of those Discworld books that I would label as 'important'. If you have only the slightest interest in history, philosophy, sociology or religion you should go read this book. If you've already read it; go and re-read it. I'll wait. Done? Cool, let's discuss this puppy.

I won't go into too much detail in regard to the story. Instead I want to talk about gods. Small Gods andAmerican Gods. Some years ago I readAmerican Gods by Neil Gaiman. I was blown away by it. Gaiman argues that gods exist because people believe in them. This is of course true, but Gaiman means it in the literal sense; Gods physically exist because there are people that believe in them. This is the reason why in American Gods, gods like Thor and Odin are dwindling, whereas the gods of Internet and TV are very powerful in this day and age. Gaiman didn't conceive this idea. It was borrowed from Pratchett (and if I remember correctly Gaiman included many nods to Pratchett's earlier work in his book and also gave him the credits for that).

In Small Gods almost the exact same principle applies. Gods are spirits roaming around the desert, waiting to latch on unsuspecting, vulnerable believers. The believer then gives the God power by believing in the deity.

The story in Small Gods revolves around the God Om. Nominally the national deity of the Omnian Empire, in fact only 1 acolyte actually believes in him. The rest of Omnia's enormous institutionalised religious apparatus performs the most horrendous acts in Om's name, while in fact no one really thinks he exists. Om, in the form of a tortoise, in desperstion reaches out to his only adherent Brutha. Brutha thereupon sets out on a journey that culminates in the shaking of the foundations of empires. Along the way Brutha and Om meet the most interesting people; prophets, madmen, philosophers, generals and slaves all share their views on life, religion and sundry related topics.

Pratchett isn't lecturing in this book, nor does he overtly take sides. Religion is ridiculed, but so is thoughtless atheism. The book bursts with funny, cynical one-liners that make you question everything you have been told. It manages not to offend, but to gently chide in a tongue-in-cheek way. I never knew gods could be so funny (nor tortoises for that matter).

This is a profound book. An important book. It is one of the most interesting fantasy books I've ever read. I therefore rate this book with a 9.5/10 (*****5 GoodReads Stars).

I've started on Lords and Ladies(Discworld 14) right away.
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#14
*riotous applause*

Its always reassuring to see your darlings loved by others. For me, Small Gods marks the start of Sir Pterry really flexing his muscles as a writer and thinker and a chain of classics follows.

On the subject of gods existing only when believed in; I doubt that was Pratchett's idea either. You can see echoes and usage of the idea littered across British esotericism (see Moore's worship of Glaucon) and British pagans very much view Pratchett as one of their own; my guess is he got it in no small part from there. It is probably not coincidence that his most powerful statement on the nature of magic (imo) followed right after.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#16
Review: Lords and Ladies (Discworld 14)
Another week, another Discworld novel completed. I just finished Lords and Ladies. This was already the fourteenth Discworld novel, but I'm definitely not fed up with the series yet. On the contrary. The books just get better and better.

In this one we return to the Witches storyline. The book starts with a short summary on the previous adventures of our coven of three. This is the first book in which Pratchett does this. He explicitly states that although all Discworld novels can be read as standalones, you get the most out of the book if you've also read the other novels in this storyline. I cannot agree more. It has been good fun and very interesting to see how the characters of Granny, Nanny and Magrat have evolved. Especially Granny Weatherwax has taken up a place among my all-time favorite fantasy characters.

The main theme in this book is, strangely enough, the theory of paralel worlds/dimensions. Expect funny, but intelligently explained paragraphs that revolve around quantum physics, Schrodinger's Cat and Chaos Theory. That's the cool thing about Pratchett's novels; they're funny and educational at the same time.

The story revolves around the mountain Kingdom of Lancre and it's fight against an invading force of Elves. These Elves -cruel and bloodthirsty creatures from another dimension- bridge the gap between worlds on Midsummer Night and wreak havoc on the inhabitants of the Ramtop Mountains. Only the Witches stand between them and total victory.

The story is largely inspired by a Shakespeare play (like most stories in the witches storyline), in this case Midsummer Night's Dream, but it of course has a typical Pratchett flavour poured all over it. This book is tantalisingly sharp, wickedly funny and unexpectedly touching. There are certain scenes were Granny Weatherwax contemplates on what could've been if she had given in to the avances of a certain young wizard when they were both young and foolish. You wouldn't expect it in a Discworld novel, but I sometimes had to rapidly blink and ensure my wife I had a mote of dust in my eye. Good stuff.

And the lolz. Aah, the lolz! This puppy had me guffawing like a crazed buffalo. The witches are just so freaking funny. I start work at 8am and my colleagues always wonder why I'm so happy when I walk in the door so early in the morning. One word: Discworld.

This is one of the funniest Discworld novels I've read so far. The story is well-paced and interesting enough to keep you turning the pages until the very end. This book deserves a good rating, and therefore I give it a well deserved 8.8/10 (*****5 GoodReads Stars).
 

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
#17
One of these days I'll write an article about the link between love and power in fantasy fiction using Weatherwax and Dumbledore as contrasting cases. Or maybe just an article comparing the two in general.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#18
Review: Men at Arms (Discworld 15)
I just finished Men at Arms (Discworld 15) by Terry Pratchett. This is the second book in the City Watch/Guards storyline and it's even better than the first book (Guards! Guards!), which I was already impressed by. Pratchett's writing style has improved a lot and the characters are much better developed. It's interesting to see this progress across the different Discworld story lines. In my opinion it is most noticeable in the Rincewind, Witches and City Watch arcs.

The characters that really stood out for me in this book were, similar to the first Guards book, again Captain Vimes and Vetinari (the Patrician). Lance-Constable Cuddy, Lance-Constable Detritus, Corporal Nobby and Sergeant Colon are also fun characters. I'm less enthusiastic about Carrot, as he is a bit of a Mary Sue (please refer to my Kingkiller thread to see my opinion about Mary Sues). He's not as bad as Kvothe of course, but his attitude can get a bit grating at times, until the last 25% of the book, where he comes into his own and it turns out he's not so perfect and simple as everyone thought he was. The interaction between all these characters is what makes this book so great. There are entire swathes of pages filled with entertaining dialogue. Good stuff.

In this book the main theme is not so readily discernible as in most of the other Discworld novels up to this point, but 'Tolerance' is the most important one. Dwarfs, trolls, the undead and humans all live together in the great city of Ankh-Morpork and this leads to tensions, especially between the dwarven population and the trolls. Throughout the book tempers often flare and the tension occasionally escalates into full-blown violence. Similar problems exist in the Watch. In line with the concept of fair representation, all species are represented in the Watch, which leads to all sorts of problems. However, through perseverance and by example of Corporal Carrot, the species learn to live and work together to make the city a better place; you are not a troll, dwarf, werewolf or woman: you are a Man of the Watch. The powerful message that this sends has never been more relevant than in this day and age of divisiveness and tensions between different groups in our own real-world societies. Pratchett was a real visionary in my opinion.

Now, the story in this book is not what I've come to expect from a Discworld novel. The strong points about Pratchett's series are the strong themes, the interesting reflections and parallels between the Discworld and our world, and of course the humorous interactions between the characters. However, the stories are often very simple (sometimes even simplistic). Not so in this book. This is an exciting detective-thriller that keeps you turning the pages. It's a true "who-dun-it?" I can't say much about the story without spoiling it, but suffice it to say a powerful weapon has been stolen from the Assassin's guild and it has apparently ended up in the hands of a dangerous murderer. Bodies show up. Clues as to who did it are few. The Watch is told to ignore the crimes. But Vimes is doing no such thing. He bites into the case with gusto and is not planning to let go until it is solved.

Then there are also three other story arcs that all play out in this book; will Captain Vimes give up his position in the Watch and get married to Lady Ramkin and thereby become the richest man in the city? Will Gaspode the talking dog finally find what he is looking for in life? And what are those rumors about an uncrowned King roaming the streets of Ankh-Morpork, just waiting to step into the spotlight? All these questions are intertwined with the main storyline and they will all be answered over the course of this book.

As this installment was again highly enjoyable, I can't do anything but give this Discworld novel a 9.2/10 (***** 5 GoodReads Stars).
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#19
Nice thread. Our opinions of the books are very similar, although I loved Witches Abroad. The scene when they
turn the cat into a man and dress him as a pirate
made me laugh so hard that it instantly became one of my all-time discworlds favorites.