The Official Beer Thread, with your Host, Bierschneeman

Peat

Journeyed there and back again
Google leads me to believe that Silvion is a Heineken man.

I'm really not an IPA fan as a rule. Troegs Nugget Nectar is about the best I've found there. Give me something dark and thick or something fruity or sour. But, if I'm at a beer festival and its free samples anyway... well go on then.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
Google leads me to believe that Silvion is a Heineken man.
My LinkedIn probably gave it away huh? :)

But yes, I work as a Project Manager at Heineken.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
Nah, I just googled Lagunitas. Googling to work it on you would have felt mildly creepy ;)
I've always thought of you as a creepy guy, so there would've been no harm done.:p
 

Khartun

Journeyed there and back again
On the first page @Khartun mentions Shiner as what he drinks most often, which is my favorite beer for daily drinking (totally not an alcoholic... mainly because I can't afford to be...). Which is probably because both of us are from Texas. I lived up in Boston for about 5 years, and the greatest woe of that terrible city was I could not buy Shiner there. Instead I was inundated with terrible IPAs and the egregiously bad Samuel Adams*.

Now that I'm out in California, I'm enjoying the hell out of Firestone Walker's 805, which is showing up on tap here in Long Beach. There's also a bar that opened up not far from my place that just serves mead and ciders, which is a pretty fun start to the evening but too sweet to maintain for the entire night.

But when the night has worn down, I usually end with a good ol' Pabst. Say what you will about the hipsters that drink it, it's still a solid beer.

* In their only defense, SA Oktoberfest beer is pretty good. At least in comparison to their regular dreck. Regional beers that I enjoyed included Magic Hat #9 and Berkshire Brewing's Steel Rail Extra Pale Ale, which was AMAZING and sold in growlers.
I had a few 805's last night. They are pretty damn good. Thanks for the rec!
 

Nuomer1

Journeyed there and back again
On 1935 January 24th the first can was sold, ever
Fact-check? I need to look this up (and that ain't gonna happen tonight!) but I thought Scott took tinned food on his Antarctic expedition . . . before WW1. They ran into problems because the tin used in the seals on the tins underwent a crystal phase change at polar temperatures, which made sudden cracking noises and compromised the seals.
Check definitions 'tinned' and 'canned'? but if they mean the same, then I can't believe a 30 year delay in that technology becoming widespread.
Or it is just possible I am wrong about Scott - but I would be surprised!
Anybody know for certain?
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
Fact-check? I need to look this up (and that ain't gonna happen tonight!) but I thought Scott took tinned food on his Antarctic expedition . . . before WW1. They ran into problems because the tin used in the seals on the tins underwent a crystal phase change at polar temperatures, which made sudden cracking noises and compromised the seals.
Check definitions 'tinned' and 'canned'? but if they mean the same, then I can't believe a 30 year delay in that technology becoming widespread.
Or it is just possible I am wrong about Scott - but I would be surprised!
Anybody know for certain?
Yes sir.
The first tin was produced in 1813. It is in fact different from a can. Though both can go by the term can.

The major deference is a liner that allows for pressured sealing, and improves stability of the contents and protects from a metallic taste.

EDIT: just realized you also asked on difference between tinning and canning. Never heard tinning but canning is a process used to jar or can foods in a way to preserve them or otherwise keep them safe to eat. It usually involves heat or perservatives... this process is not used on beer.
 
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Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
Fact-check? I need to look this up (and that ain't gonna happen tonight!) but I thought Scott took tinned food on his Antarctic expedition . . . before WW1. They ran into problems because the tin used in the seals on the tins underwent a crystal phase change at polar temperatures, which made sudden cracking noises and compromised the seals.
Check definitions 'tinned' and 'canned'? but if they mean the same, then I can't believe a 30 year delay in that technology becoming widespread.
Or it is just possible I am wrong about Scott - but I would be surprised!
Anybody know for certain?
Beer facts I know, I had to look up the an Antarctica thing...was it Franklin?. 1845 the had lead poisoning because the tins were soldered with tin-lead alloy.

EDIT: OH. Scott, not franklin...I'm not finding it I'm sure it's right. But I can't verify without much more time spent than I want on it.
 
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Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
Who cares? @Bierschneeman, you just gave us another excuse to indulge. Much appreciated!
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
Who cares? @Bierschneeman, you just gave us another excuse to indulge. Much appreciated!
Best watch what praises and encouragements you give me about excuses to drink..there are many

On a related note "Happy Robert Burns day"! So breakout your scotch whiskey (or malty Scottish ales like those that come from belhaven) and drink a toast while you read your Scottish poetry.
 

atheling

A Poet of the Khaiem
Fact-check? I need to look this up (and that ain't gonna happen tonight!) but I thought Scott took tinned food on his Antarctic expedition . . . before WW1. They ran into problems because the tin used in the seals on the tins underwent a crystal phase change at polar temperatures, which made sudden cracking noises and compromised the seals.
Check definitions 'tinned' and 'canned'? but if they mean the same, then I can't believe a 30 year delay in that technology becoming widespread.
Or it is just possible I am wrong about Scott - but I would be surprised!
Anybody know for certain?
Canning was invented in the 19th century, I think, but it originally meant putting cooked food in jars (I think "tinning" is a UK term for canning specifically in tin cans--so, more specific). By WWI manufactured canned food, in "cans" just as we use the term today (not jars), was certainly in widespread use. So, yeah, the first can of food is probably from well before WWI (19th century sometime?).

I think all @Bierschneeman meant was the first can of beer (and probably also soda): here's a wired.com article from 2011 about it (with more links if you're interested): "Jan. 24, 1935: First Canned Beer Sold". Carbonated beverages, according to the article, were a bit of a problem for the metal can business, and early beer cans just exploded. So it took until the early 30s before someone figured out how to make single-serving cans that could handle the pressure.
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
Canning was invented in the 19th century, I think, but it originally meant putting cooked food in jars (I think "tinning" is a UK term for canning specifically in tin cans--so, more specific). By WWI manufactured canned food, in "cans" just as we use the term today (not jars), was certainly in widespread use. So, yeah, the first can of food is probably from well before WWI (19th century sometime?).

I think all @Bierschneeman meant was the first can of beer (and probably also soda): here's a wired.com article from 2011 about it (with more links if you're interested): "Jan. 24, 1935: First Canned Beer Sold". Carbonated beverages, according to the article, were a bit of a problem for the metal can business, and early beer cans just exploded. So it took until the early 30s before someone figured out how to make single-serving cans that could handle the pressure.
Nope I meant it exactly as I said, first tin sold was 1813 ( it was a wrapped tin based cylinder soldered with tin-lead alloy used to hold non acidic food, canning is seperate) , can be called a can technically, but the idea of the lined can that we use today was invented in 1933 and first sold in 1935 both as a sole idea of selling beer. The first liner was a wax.
After this the modern can was then used for Sodas, and later became the only can type used for food.

But I think I said all this before.

A quick Google search ( because instead of citing numerous books that's the easiest) will find a wikipedia article on beverage can, and one on tin can which will collaborate. Or you can find the history on the BCCA website (it's the oldest can collect ting group) or MBAA ( but I that might be unavailable for non members (master brewers association of america))
 
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atheling

A Poet of the Khaiem
Nope I meant it exactly as I said, first tin sold was 1813 ( it was a wrapped tin based cylinder soldered with tin-lead alloy used to hold non acidic food, canning is seperate) , can be called a can technically
That's a can. Also a tin, if you like (and I've heard people call steel cans "tins"). What was invented in 1933 was specifically the beer can: the company was looking for a way to sell beer in metal containers (probably in the hopes that it would be cheaper than glass bottles)--beer in particular, not tuna fish or spam or peach pie filling, which were already widely sold in metal containers--and by 1935 they finally found somebody willing to use their equipment (for free, they wouldn't pay for it). Was lining the detail that made the 1930s beer can work?
 

Bierschneeman

Journeyed there and back again
That's a can. Also a tin, if you like (and I've heard people call steel cans "tins").?
I said that.... you quoted me saying that...
Are you just arguing on the basis of semantics?
So if I said "modern can" instead of can, you would have no complaints? Nope won't do it.

Acknowledging that rifling and the word rifle existed before the rifle was invented does not mean you have to say "modern rifle" when stating it's invention date.

What was invented in 1933 was specifically the beer can: the company was looking for a way to sell beer in metal containers (probably in the hopes that it would be cheaper than glass bottles)--beer in particular, not tuna fish or spam or peach pie filling, which were already widely sold in metal containers--and by 1935 they finally found somebody willing to use their equipment (for free, they wouldn't pay for it). Was lining the detail that made the 1930s beer can work?
the can invented in 1933 was invented for food soda and beer, this patented idea (Edit: american can is the company) was then pitched to the brewing company in question ( actually it's parent company, a larger brewing company up north) it's key difference was a liner intended to both help prevent the metal from tainting the contents and allowing slightly pressured contents ( the pressure rating proved inadequate and saw various improvements)

The company then used their own equipment to do all this, But installed it in the brewery, they already had a bottling line all they had to do make sure the manufacturer ( is it the manufacturer who you mean gave away equipment for free? They were trying to sell an idea no one would buy they had tooe) of the can put a cone top on the can so it would work on the bottling line ( this feature was also patented) the first can was sold in 1935 and the company started rolling out in other markets, because the rights were owned by the manufacturer, 1936 the first soda was put into a can, and later that year the first food item.

Can sells increased like never before, and this can replaced the ancient variety and became the only variety of can.
 
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