What Sci-Fi Book Are You Reading?

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TomTB

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Have you read any of his work? I was thinking of starting his Broken Empire trilogy next myself.
Nope, not read anything by him. Bought the first two books of the Broken Empire in a charity shop a few weeks ago for a couple of quid, so have them lying around, so will prob start these after Red Rising.
 

moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
How do you mean? It reads just like what I would expect out of a science fiction novel. I'm also not quite sure of what you mean by stereotypical and archetypical characterisation within this novel.
In reference to archetypes, the Poet would be the Fool and then we have the crazy old hermit; these are fantasy archetypes. Characters also have a tendency to act the way you would expect them to and I think that's because the author has many of the characters, minor and main, pigeonholed into specific roles that they're supposed to play and they rarely deviate from these specified roles; there's also the strong adherence to religion that makes the actions of some characters predictable but I think this can be seen as a strength to characterization as well as a weakness. The Abbot in the third story is probably the most well developed character. The reason this doesn't read like a sci fi novel at first is because of the low tech at first and the focus on religion which I know is supposed to be rare for sci fi.
 

Hand of Fear

Journeyed there and back again
Can't say I'm enjoying The Martian that much, one of my biggest problems with it is Mark's (the main character) ability to fix anything that goes wrong no matter what the problem is.

There always seems to be a solution, at no point in the book so far have I ever felt that he is in any danger.

On top of that the bulk of the book is based on one man trapped on Mars, so the book reads like a diary or a one-way conversation.

I also have no real sense of Mark's personality, he has no one to talk to or interact with and I'm sure you need this to get some kind of idea.
 

TomTB

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Can't say I'm enjoying The Martian that much
I've just read the first 3 lines on Amazon, and must say, as opening 3 lines go, I really enjoyed it. This one is on my list .. let me know your opinion once you've finished it, I'd be interested to hear!

I'm around a quarter of the way in to Red Rising. Pleased to say I'm really enjoying it. I do get the impression it has been written so they can make a nice big fat film franchise out of it, but this doesn't detract too much from the fact it's well written and has some strong characters.

Poor Eo :(
 

Boreas

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The reason this doesn't read like a sci fi novel at first is because of the low tech at first and the focus on religion which I know is supposed to be rare for sci fi.
I think there's always been a substantial focus on religion in science fiction throughout the decades. I've read a lot of short stories by various authors that focus on some aspect of religion or the other. I can think of short stories like Lester Del Ray's "For I Am a Jealous People!" (where invaders come to take over Earth and they have their own covenant with God and are the chosen people) and Anthony Boucher's "A Quest for St. Aquin" (where an artificial intelligence logically deduces the existence of God - using Thomas Aquinas' argument as a model). I know Aruthur C. Clarke has written a couple such.

There was actually a whole boom of such stories in the 1950s and 1960s, of which "A Canticle for Leibowitz" is probably the most impressive example. I also really liked the novel "A Case of Conscience" by James Blish. But you can go as far back as Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" and come as recent as Mary Doria Russell's "The Sparrow" and Simmon's "Hyperion Cantos" in the 1990s for impressive science fiction stories with a strong focus on religion. Most of the time, it ends up focusing on the Catholic religion and with Jesuits, in particular.
 

Boreas

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Currently, I'm halfway through the first Polity novel by Neal Asher, "Gridlinked".
 

Boreas

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Thanks Boreas ... Will give those a shot at some point, they're already on my list! Thinking of a return to Fantasy soon though (probably Mark Lawrence!), but will get around to these eventually !!!
I just read his Broken Empires trilogy a little over a month ago. I really got into it...kept reading till 1-2am on quite a few nights. Ending was strange - it was decent, and yet...

Overall, I came out thoroughly entertained. It's a really fast-paced read. Jorg is like what I would expect an unrestrained Peter Wiggin to be.
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
Finished A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke. Not a bad book at all, although I'm drooling a little bit when I'm thinking what someone like Dan Simmons would have done with the same settings.
The book is rather outmoded, taking place on the moon and written in the 1950's, but still, a decent read.
 

TomTB

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Finished Red Rising. Thought it was ok, not hugely impressed, but found myself wanting to read on. Will likely read the sequel when it comes out. Firmly in the '6.5 or 7 / 10 area' for me. The start was awesome, the griminess of the world was so evident from the writing, but after the great start (with some great characters and some moving relationships/scenes), the book fell a bit flat, and more or less became one long chapter with a group of characters that didn't on the whole do a lot for me.

It's got a definite 'Young Adult' feel to it. If I was going to make comparisons I'd say it's the lovechild of a quick fling between Hunger Games and Lord of the Flies. I haven't read any of the gumph behind its release, but it wouldn't surprise me in the slightest if this is being touted as the 'next Hunger Games'.
 
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moonspawn

Journeyed there and back again
It's got a definite 'Young Adult' feel to it. If I was going to make comparisons I'd say it's the lovechild of a quick fling between Hunger Games and Lord of the Flies. I haven't read any of the gumph behind its release, but it wouldn't surprise me in the slightest if this is being touted as the 'next Hunger Games'.
I'm not sure I even want to read this now. I didn't like Hunger Games or Lord of the Flies. The former was too simplistic for my tastes and the latter too "in your face," if you know what I mean.
 

Boreas

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Still not finished with Asher's first Polity novel. I've had less time to read the last few days. Though last night, about 20 minutes before going to sleep I felt like something extremely light to read and so started the first novel of the Liaden series called "Agent of Change" by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. I've heard this series is a good snack read.

Maybe someone can start a monthly sticky thread for what everyone's reading like in the Fantasy discussion board?
 

tom.pace.315

Philosophizes with Kellhus
Anybody read the demon cycle trilogy? It starts with the warded man. Peter v brett. I read the 1st book and I'm going to read the next one after tower lord. I was wondering if they were any good
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
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Anybody read the demon cycle trilogy? It starts with the warded man. Peter v brett. I read the 1st book and I'm going to read the next one after tower lord. I was wondering if they were any good
That's not really a sci-fi, so I don't see why you post that particular question in this thread, but yes most people here have read at least the first book.
The general opinion is that the quality of the series goes down with every book. In my opinion the 1st book is full of potential, 2nd is a let down and 3rd one is just a failure that makes me think what Peter V. Brett was smoking when he wrote that.

On a side note questions like these are best suited to this thread Have You Read This Book?

I know you're new to this forum so welcome :)
 

TomTB

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I am new to this. I apologize
No need to apologise .. post what you like where you like, there's no hardfast rules, just makes a bit more sense posting things about fantasy in the fantasy section - you're more likely to get a response that way.

Agree with Alucard though, everyone I've seen mention those books on here say they get really bad after a promising start. But then again the last book was voted one of the best releases of last year (or the year before, can't remember) on another site, so it has its fans too!
 

Boreas

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Reading Halcyon Drift by Brian Stableford, book 1 of 6 of the Hooded Swan series. Some 70s Space Opera. It's short (ca. 200 pages) and easy to read. I like the alien mind-symbiont in the main character's head and their back-and-forth conversations. Funny how the mind-symbiont (whom the protagonist thinks of as the 'wind') is much more optimistic about most things compared to the emotionally-stunted main character. It's a very straightforward plot with a few classic SF tropes, but nonetheless surprisingly fun to read.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
I'm not sure I even want to read this now. I didn't like Hunger Games or Lord of the Flies. The former was too simplistic for my tastes and the latter too "in your face," if you know what I mean.
Read what Ben has to say about Red Rising before making that decision.
 
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