Books by Charles De Lint

Dreams Un

by Charles de Lint

1993

Jack Of Kinrowan

by Charles de Lint

Jack of Kinrowan
An acknowledged classic of contemporary fantasy, Jack of Kinrowan brings together in one volume Charles de Lint's rollicking saga of wild faerie magic on the streets of the city.

Jack, the Giant Killer
A faceless gang of bikers on Wild Hunt through the streets of present-day Ottawa hurtles young Jacky Rowan across the threshold into the perilous land of Faerie. There, to her dismay, she is hailed as the Jack of Kinrowan, a once-and-future trickster hero whose lot is to save the Elven Courts from unimaginable evil.

Drink Down the Moon
Once the realm of Faerie drew its power from the Moon herself. But now a ghastly creature has stolen that power and enslaved the Fair Folk--and Jacky Rowan herself. Only Johnny Faw, a hadsome fiddler unaware of his magical gifts, has the power to set them free.

Jack, The Giant Killer

by Charles de Lint

De Lint at his best. When Jacky's boyfriend walks out, her life changes more than she could ever imagine. In a fit of angst she chops off her long blond hair then goes out to wander the streets of Ottawa. She's startled out of her reverie by a faceless gang of bikers attacking a small man whose body disappears, leaving behind only a red cap. The cap shows Jacky an unimaginable side of Ottawa and sets her on an impossible quest to save the good fairies from their evil counterparts.

Luck, magic, and love bring to life a perilous, rollicking adventure involving Jacky, her best friend Kate, nefarious giants, nasty bogans, a trickster, a whimsical wizard, a small hob, and the last of the Swan Princes. Jacky's daring and quick wit make for an exciting story that is impossible to put down. Cleverly mingling folklore, fairy tale and modern life, the novel points to a fine connection between what is seen and what is not, and the importance of belief, compassion, and loyalty.

This Triskell Press e-book contains a new Afterword by the author.

Awards:
Winner, Canadian SF/Fantasy Award (Aurora) for Best Work in English
Winner, YALSA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults (Young Adult Library Services Association)

Review quotes:
De Lint has a deceptively casual writing style, but his ability to pull in the reader's sympathy and suspension of disbelief is entirely artful. This volume is a good place to start if you're unfamiliar with de Lint's writing, and just as pleasurable to return to after a few years' absence.
- Challenging Destiny

De Lint keeps the pace going full tilt, involving the reader immediately. The backdrop of Ottawa adds a delicious dimension as mortals and sidhe coexist on the streets, the former unable to see that latter among them. The characters are (mostly) likable and lively, and Jacky is a heroine after anyone's heart. It is a joy to watch her grow from a timid frightened girl into a resourceful hero, and she makes a darn good role model, too.
- Rambles

Moonheart

by Charles de Lint


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Spirits In The Wires

by Charles de Lint

At a popular Newford online research and library Web site called the Wordwood, a mysterious crash occurs. Everyone visiting the site at the moment of the crash vanishes from where they were sitting in front of their computers. Christy Ridding's girldfriend Saskia disappears right before his eyes, along with countless others.

To rescue their missing friends, Christy and his companions must journey into Newford's otherworld, where the Wordwood, it transpires, has a physical presence of its own...

Svaha

by Charles de Lint

this is the most Native of his novels

The Blue Girl

by Charles De Lint

When Imogene, her mother, and her brother move to Newford, she decides to reinvent herself-this time she won't go looking for trouble. She quickly gets to know two very different people. Maxine is a "good girl," following a strict life plan. Imogene helps Maxine loosen up and break a few rules, and in turn Maxine keeps her on the straight and narrow. Imogene's other new friend is a little more unusual. His name is Adrian. He is a ghost. Adrian was killed when he jumped off the high school roof in 1998, and hasn't left since. He has a huge crush on her—so much so that he wants her to see the fairies that also haunt the school. The fairies invade Imogene's dreams, blurring the line between the unreal and the real. When her imaginary childhood friend Pelly actually manifests, Imogene knows something is terribly wrong. With Maxine, Adrian, and Pelly's help, Imogene challenges the dark forces of Faery. This compelling novel from Charles de Lint, the acknowledged founder of the "urban fantasy" genre, is set in the city of Newford, home to some of his best stories. After reading it, you will want to live in Newford, too.

Locus Young Adult

the little country

by Charles de Lint

When folk musician Janey Little finds a mysterious manuscript in an old trunk in her grandfather's cottage, she is swept into a dangerous realm both strange and familiar. But true magic lurks within the pages of The Little Country, drawing genuine danger from across the oceans into Janey's life, impelling her--armed only with her music--toward a terrifying confrontation.

Come walk the mist-draped hills of Cornwall, come walk the ancient standing stones. Listen to the fiddles, and the wind, and the sea. Come step with Janey Little into the pages of...The Little Country.

BSFA
World Fantasy

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